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Online Courses Offered through the Early College Credit Program

Below are all courses offered through the UW Oshkosh Early College Credit Program. Not all courses are offered every semester, please consult the course catalog to view when/if courses are offered.

Anthropology 101 - Indigenous Wisconsin

Description in UWO course catalog: An interdisciplinary introduction to the history, culture, and sovereignty of American Indians through the disciplines of Anthropology, Business, Geography, History, Political Science, and Sociology.

More detailed description: Indigenous Wisconsin is an interdisciplinary introduction to the history, culture and sovereignty of American Indians through the disciplines of Anthropology, Business, Geography, History, Political Science, and Sociology. Students will engage American Indian perspectives of historical events and policies. Additionally, students will explore how historical events affect sovereignty, political relationships, and current American Indian issues. What all this really means is that you’ll learn about indigenous North America in general and their relationships with what is now the United States of America. Specifically, you’ll learn about indigenous Wisconsin and some of the tribal histories and current issues.

Number of Credits: 3

Enrollment Maximum: 34

Enrollment Minimum (Combined): 23

Anthropology 102 - Introduction to Anthropology

Description in UWO course catalog: Basic concepts from the various areas of study within anthropology (cultural, linguistic, biological, and Archaeological) brought together to examine and explain, in an integrated fashion, aspects of the human condition.

More detailed description: This course presents a survey of the four major sub fields of anthropology: cultural anthropology, archaeology, linguistic anthropology and biological/physical anthropology. Topics include ethics and methods of anthropology, evolution and genetics, primates, first hominids, first humans, the development of farming, cities and states, the definition of culture, ethnicity and race, language, economics, politics, families, kinship, marriage, gender, religion, the cultural legacy of colonialism, and the causes, processes and consequences of globalization.

Number of Credits: 3

Enrollment Maximum: 34

Enrollment Minimum (Combined): 23

Biology 104 - Ecosphere in Crisis

Description in UWO course catalog: Treats humans as biological organisms that interact with the living and nonliving world. Emphasis is given to how humans affect, and are affected by, their environment. Topics covered include basic ecology, global change, renewable and nonrenewable energy sources, air and water quality, and biological diversity. Special course fees will be charged to cover the cost of transportation during local field trips.

More detailed description: The primary objective of this course is to develop a foundation in environmental science that will enable you to understand the inherent value of ecosystems and the impact humans have on their environment. Moreover, a solid foundation in environmental science will provide you with the ability to analyze, synthesize, evaluate, and interpret information and data from various contexts to understand environmental issues and form opinions. Importantly, by understanding how we influence the environment, you will be better able to become involved in shaping the environment. Therefore, a secondary objective is to motivate each of you to take an active role in environmental issues that are of particular importance to you.

Number of Credits: 4

Enrollment Maximum: 27

Enrollment Minimum (Combined): 27

Biology 105 - Biological Concepts - Unity

Description in UWO course catalog: An introduction to the biological sciences. Addresses phenomena common to a diversity of life forms. Biological organization, cell biology, processing energy, genetics, evolution.

More detailed description: The thorough understanding of basic cell processes and structure. Understand the role of DNA in heredity and function including replication, cell division, transcription, and translation. Define the process of evolution. Describe the basic components of an ecosystem. The following proficiencies will be addressed in this course:

  • Analyzing, synthesizing, evaluating, and interpreting scientific data.
  • Interpreting graphs, tables, and diagrams.
  • Reading with comprehension and critical perception.
  • Developing a large and varied vocabulary in the biological sciences.

Number of Credits: 4-5

Enrollment Maximum: 27

Enrollment Minimum (Combined): 27

Biology 141 - Principles of Heredity

Description in UWO course catalog: Principles of Heredity with applications to plant, animal, and human inheritance; current advances in genetics and their bearing on the life sciences. Lecture may also include demonstrations, discussion, and field trips.

More detailed description: This course deals with the principles of heredity, with applications to plant, animal, and human inheritance. It also deals with current advances in genetics and its bearing on other life sciences.

This course will examine various aspects of heredity including its fundamental basis such the structure of DNA and how the pieces of information on it are translated into traits. Also, students will look at the factors which influence the way traits are inherited and expressed. Students will examine mutation of the genetic molecule, diseases, and how genes behave in a population.

Number of Credits: 3

Enrollment Maximum: 34

Enrollment Minimum (Combined): 23

Criminal Justice 110 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

Description in UWO course catalog: A beginning course in Criminal Justice designed to provide an understanding of the criminal justice system and to lay the foundation for additional work in the discipline. This course should be taken by students anticipating a major in criminal justice. Credit cannot be received for both Criminal Justice 103 and Criminal Justice 110. Special fees may apply.

More detailed description: Introduction to Criminal Justice: The Politics of Crime and Punishment focuses on the competing goals of public policy in criminal justice, including public order, due process, efficiency, rights, and liberties; analyzes the interplay of key actors including police, courts, and prisons in policymaking and implementation; and examines the role of media and myth in the public’s understanding of the criminal justice system.

Number of Credits: 3

Enrollment Maximum: 34

Enrollment Minimum (Combined): 23

Engineering 105 - Engineering Fundamentals

Description in UWO course catalog: This course is designed to equip students with the necessary tools and background information to prepare them to be successful engineering students as well as a successful practicing engineer. Topics covered in this course include project management, teamwork, technical writing, working with data and using spreadsheets, creating presentations, engineering design, and a survey of the engineering profession.

Prerequisites: Algebra (UWO MAT 103)

More detailed description: This class is called “Engineering Fundamentals” because the developers of the course feel that as an engineering student there are certain elemental concepts that all engineering students should possess. Many of your professors that you have in your engineering courses will “assume you know these things.” Yet, no one may have ever told you them–it is one of those things you should know.

Number of Credits: 3

Enrollment Maximum: 28

Enrollment Minimum (Combined): 23

Engineering 110 - Engineering Graphics with Computer Aided Drafting

Description in UWO course catalog: An introductory course in engineering graphics focusing on graphical communication. Topics include descriptive geometry elements, visualization, engineering drawing techniques, orthographic projection, pictorial representation, auxiliary views, section views, and dimensioning. The course incorporates computer aided drafting (CAD) with engineering applications using 2-D drawing and 3-D modeling techniques.

More detailed description: Some of the specific topics we will cover are the following:

  • AutoCAD and SolidWorks software
  • Visualization
  • Engineering drawing techniques
  • Orthographic projection
  • Pictorial representation
  • Auxiliary and section views
  • Basic dimensioning

Number of Credits: 3

Note: Student must have access to a Microsoft Windows computer capable of running Autodesk and SolidWorks programs. Chromebooks not sufficient.

Enrollment Maximum: 28

Enrollment Minimum (Combined): 28

Geography 101 - Introduction to Cultural Geography

Description in UWO course catalog: This course explores interrelationships between cultural processes and place, asking critical questions about power, inclusion and exclusion, language, race and ethnicity, migration, economy, and environment. Students will apply cultural geography concepts to everyday life and to develop a deeper understanding of current local, national, and global events and issues.

More detailed description: Culture is hard to define; however, some of the components of it are easily recognized and include things like population, migration, language, religion, material items, ethnicity, politics, and development. We will examine all of these and several other issues during the semester. We will stress the variation in the cultural landscape and critically analyze several current problems facing modern society, such as overpopulation and differences between societies.

As a result of taking this course, you will be able to:

  • analyze, synthesize, evaluate and interpret geographic information and ideas;
  • interpret graphs, tables, diagrams, and maps;
  • read and evaluate material with comprehension and critical perception; and
  • gather information from printed sources, electronic sources, and observation.

By working through each lesson and participating in the discussions, we will exchange ideas that will help us to better understand the diversity of the cultural landscape and the similarities and differences between different social groups.

Number of Credits: 3

Enrollment Maximum: 34

Enrollment Minimum (Combined): 23

Physics/Astronomy 100 - Survey of Astronomy

Description of Course: A descriptive survey of astronomy for students with minimal background in mathematics and science. Topics include the solar system, stars, nebulae, galaxies, cosmology, and astronomical methods. Credits may not be earned both for this course and for any Physics/Astronomy course numbered between 103 and 114 inclusive.

Prerequisite: Completion of the minimal University general education math requirement or qualifying for Mathematics 104 or higher via the Mathematics Placement Exam.

Number of Credits: 3

Enrollment Maximum: 34

Enrollment Minimum (Combined): 23

Psychology 101 - General Psychology

Description of Course: A beginning course in psychology designed to provide an understanding of contemporary approaches to human behavior and to lay the foundation for additional work in psychology. Students must complete a course research requirement. Credit can only be received for one of the following courses: Psychology 101, 102, 104, or 110.

More Detailed Description:Introductory Psychology is a survey of major content areas in Psychology. Topics include research methodology, learning, memory, cognition, biological psychology, sensation, perception, motivation, emotion, development, personality, and psychopathology.

Course Outcomes

1. Describe the major theoretical perspectives that govern the study of psychology

2. Summarize the contributions of the major psychologists to the field of psychology and the research methods they used

3. Examine the biological, environmental, and cultural factors that influence human behavior, thoughts, and emotions

4. Analyze various psychological theories that explain human behavior

5. Apply basic psychological principles to analyze real-life experiences

6. Describe the nature of the principle psychological disorders and treatments for those disorders

Number of Credits: 3

Enrollment Maximum: 34

Enrollment Minimum (Combined): 23

Religious Studies 101 - Introduction to the Study of Religion

Description in UWO course catalog: This course introduces students to various methods employed in the academic study of religion and will provide opportunity for students to apply these methods to diverse expressions of the religious life.

More detailed description: This course introduces students to the basic theories employed in the academic study of religion and will provide opportunity for students to apply these theories to diverse expressions of religions and critically reflect on related issues of contemporary relevance. The basic theories covered include anthropology, sociology, psychology, phenomenology, and economic approaches and the religions covered include Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Christianity, Judaism, and Islam.

Number of Credits: 3

Enrollment Maximum: 34

Enrollment Minimum (Combined): 23

Sociology 101 - Introductory Sociology

Description in UWO course catalog: Orientation to the sociological perspective. Basic sociological concepts, research procedures, processes of human interaction, and social institutions.

More detailed description:Introduction to the basic concepts, theories and methods of sociology, emphasizing the significance of the self and culture, social process and organization, and forces of social stability and change.

After successfully completing the 11 lessons in this course, learners will have an in-depth understanding of:

1. What interests sociologists

2. How sociologists ask questions

3. How they find answers to their questions

4. Core sociological issues, concepts and perspectives

5. Significant research findings about contemporary social issues in the United States.

Number of Credits: 3

Enrollment Maximum: 34

Enrollment Minimum (Combined): 23

Spanish 110 - Introduction to Spanish I

Description in UWO course catalog: Emphasis on basic audio-lingual skills, acquisition of an active vocabulary, rapid reading for comprehension and fundamental concepts of grammar.

More detailed description: Spanish 110 is the initial course in the language sequence designed for students who have had little or no previous training in the language. The fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar will be presented through reading, writing, speaking, and listening activities created to introduce students to both the Spanish language and the cultures of Spanish-speakers in the US and abroad.

Number of Credits: 4

Enrollment Maximum: 28

Enrollment Minimum (Combined): 21

Spanish 111 - Introduction to Spanish II

Description of Course: This is the second half of the first year language sequence. You’re in this class because you’ve either successfully completed Spa 110 or the equivalent, such as through prior study of Spanish in high school. You will continue to learn the fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar which will be presented through reading, writing, speaking, and listening activities created to develop your proficiency in Spanish and to enhance your understanding of the cultures of Spanish-speakers in the US and abroad.

Number of Credits: 4

Enrollment Maximum: 28

Enrollment Minimum (Combined): 21

UW Oshkosh Admissions
800 Algoma Boulevard
135 Dempsey Hall
Oshkosh, WI 54901

920-424-3164
admissions@uwosh.edu

Hours of Operation:
M-F 7:45 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

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