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Office: Swart 317
Phone: (920) 424-4406
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Gina Schiavone, Administrative Assistant II
schiavog@uwosh.edu

SCHEDULES FOR ANTHROPOLOGY AND GLOBAL RELIGIONS SPRING 2022/ MAY-TERM/Summer/ FALL 2022/J-TERM 2023

 

*SPRING 2022 ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTHROPOLOGY 102- INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY (3 CR.)

Basic concepts from the various areas of study within anthropology (cultural, linguistic, biological, and Archaeological) brought together to examine and explain, in an integrated fashion, aspects of the human condition.

ANTHROPOLOGY 103- INTRODUCTION TO HMONG STUDIES (3 CR.)

There are 299,000 Hmong living in the United States, with most living in California, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. The Hmong are from Laos, a previously colonized country of the French. During the Vietnam War, the United States engaged in a covert operation in Laos called the Secret War, where U.S. CIA operatives recruited Hmong and other ethnic Lao minorities to fight as proxy soldiers for the U.S. against Communist regimes in Southeast Asia. However, the U.S.’s failed military intervention and withdrawal from SE Asia left many Hmong who allied with the U.S. to face reprisal from the new Pathet Lao Communist party that came into power. It is estimated that 150,000 Hmong left Laos. This course is a brief, interdisciplinary, and expansive survey of Hmong Studies from Hmong migration out of China, migration to Southeast Asia, French colonialism of Indochina, American intervention in Laos during the Vietnam War, exodus from Laos and refugee resettlement, and life in the U.S. This course examines the humanistic questions of displacement, trauma, economic inequality, gender and sexuality, race and racialization, as well as diasporic and imagined communities beyond nation-state borders.

ANTHROPOLOGY 150 – THE ANCIENT WORLD (3 CR.)

We will explore some of the most significant archaeological sites around the globe and the people who built them, for example, the ancient people who built the enormous pyramids of Egypt and Mexico, hunted woolly mammoths during the Ice Age, created sprawling cities in Mesopotamia and Africa, and erected the large stones at Stonehenge. By looking back at people of the past students will acquire knowledge of and appreciation for the diverse beliefs, ideas, traditions, and social, political, and economic systems around the world and throughout time. Additionally, students will be able to recognize the construction of identity as  shaped by cultural heritage and patterns of power or privilege in the past and present.

ANTHROPOLOGY 202 – INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4 CR.)

Physical anthropology is the study of the human biology and behavior in the framework of evolution. This course provides an introduction to the scientific approaches and methods used by physical anthropologists, including evolutionary theory and the mechanisms of heredity, the ecology and behavior of nonhuman primates and what they can teach us about human origins, the fossil evidence for human evolution, and modern human variation and adaptation. Students should leave this class with a broader understanding of humanity’s place in nature and a grasp of our unique evolutionary history. Special fees may apply.

ANTHROPOLOGY 204 – CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3 CR.)

Focusing on the concept of ‘culture’, the course discusses the aims, methods, and achievements of anthropological research and presents a general model for comprehending human society. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 204Q2 – CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3 CR.)

Focusing on the concept of ‘culture’, the course discusses the aims, methods, and achievements of anthropological research and presents a general model for comprehending human society. Cannot take both Anthro 204Q2 and Anthro 204 for credit.

ANTHROPOLOGY 206 – INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3 CR.)

A study of language as it relates to human culture and the transmission of culture. Genetic and typological variation in language; theories of linguistic universals and relativity. Consideration of social stratification, multidialectal and multilingual societies, selection of national languages.

ANTHROPOLOGY 208 – INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY (3 CR.)

An introduction to the study of humanity’s past, and how archaeologists retrieve, process, analyze and interpret surviving prehistoric materials.

ANTHROPOLOGY 225Q3 – CELEBRATING CULTURE THROUGH THE ARTS (3 CR.)

This course will focus on community engagement with people of diverse ethnic groups utilizing anthropological approaches to visual art, music, and dance. In the course, students will examine how people of various cultural and ethnic backgrounds communicate through visual art, music, and dance about issues such as gender, family, identity, tradition, historical consciousness, ideology, experience, and more. At the same time, students will learn about anthropological approaches to art and performance, how art illuminates diverse cultures, and how knowledge of culture facilitates deeper understanding of the arts. In addition, the class will explore art and performance as experiential modes of learning that go beyond verbal and written means. As part of this process, students will learn about how anthropologists work with people, especially through ethnographic methods. These purposes converge in the students’ engagement in diverse peoples and arts in the local community. Prerequisites: Quest I and Quest II. (Quest III when offered). Special course fee of $15 applies. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 300 – TOPICS IN ANTHRO  (3 CR.)

A variable topics course covering a theme of current interest in anthropology.  Each time the course is offered, the topic and number of credit hours will be announced in the Schedule of Classes.  May be repeated with different content.

001-Theory in Hmong Studies

002- Indigenous Peoples & National Parks. Cross-listed: Anthropology 300-002/Environmental Studies 390. Students may receive credit for only one of the cross-listed courses.

ANTHROPOLOGY 339 – HINDU MYTH AND RITUAL (3 CR.)

Working within the diversity of the Hindu tradition and beyond the stereotypical mysticism that Westerners often attribute to this tradition is a vibrant current of mythic narratives and ritual performances. In this class we will look at the various ways that Hindu myths and rituals serve as integral components of the daily lives of Hindu people and will take up such issues as how Hindus properly worship images, how Hindu deities can take on human form, and why the goddess Durga slays the buffalo demon. Cross-listed: Anthropology 339/Global Religions 339. Students may receive credit for only one of the cross-listed courses.

ANTHROPOLOGY 344 – KINSHIP, GENDER AND SEXUALITY (3 CR.)

Examination of comparative gender roles and the behavior, status, and economic position of the sexes in cultural groups other than contemporary U.S. society. Cross-listed: Anthropology 344/ Women’s and Gender Studies 344.  Students may receive credit for only one of the cross-listed courses.

ANTHROPOLOGY 372 – PRIMATE BEHAVIOR & ECOLOGY (3 CR.)

This course is designed to introduce students to our closest living relatives, the nonhuman primates (monkeys, apes, and prosimians). The course will focus on primate diversity and characteristics, ecology, social behavior, communication, cognition, and conservation. We will also discuss the relevance of primate studies to understanding human evolution. This course will involve at least one field trip to the Milwaukee Zoo. Cross-listed: Anthropology 372/Environmental Studies 372. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

ANTHROPOLOGY 377 – FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3 CR.)

In this course students will be introduced to the methods and analytical techniques of forensic anthropology. The topics covered will include the stages of soft tissue decomposition, estimation of the post-mortem interval, forensic entomology, using skeletal elements to estimate demographic information, forensic odontology, skeletal trauma, and determining the cause of death. Additionally, Students will analyze simulated forensic cases using real human skeletons and learn to construct case reports for law enforcement agencies. Prerequisites: Anthropology 202 or Anthropology 374, or consent of instructor. Cross-listed: Anthropology 377/Criminal Justice 377. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

ANTHROPOLOGY 400 – ANTHROPOLOGY SENIOR SEMINAR (3 CR.)

This course serves as the culminating capstone experience for Anthropology Majors by integrating students’ training throughout their career in the program. Students will identify, evaluate, apply, and synthesize theory, research methods, and ethics. In consultation with the instructor, students will conduct an original project that involves research design, literature review and citation, data collection, analysis and theoretical application, conclusions, and contributions. Ideally, the project should build on previous data collection work begun in one of the program’s research methods courses. However, with agreement from the instructor, students may launch a new research project to collect data, analyze an existing data set, or critically analyze a body of Anthropological literature. Research projects will relate to one of the subfields of Anthropology (Archeology, Biological, Cultural, or Linguistic Anthropology, Ethnohistory, or other subfield). Students will also reflect on skills and concepts learned over their career as a major and develop an understanding of related academic and non-academic careers post-graduation. Prerequisites: ANT 202 Introduction to Biological Anthropology, 204 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, 206 Language in Culture, 208 Introduction to Anthropology, ANT 301 Reading Theory; One of the following research methods courses: ANT 350 Ethnographic Methods, ANT 362 Field Work in Archeology, ANT 363 Archeological Analysis, ANT 377 Forensic Anthropology, or ANT 394 Field Experience; or consent of instructor.

SPRING 3-week 2022/SUMMER 4-week 1st 2022

ANTHROPOLOGY 362/395- STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM (6 CR.)

Pre-Travel Class Dates: May 16, 2022 12:00PM Attendance is required. Gain hands-on experience excavating archaeological sites around Slavina, Slovenia. This was a bustling region from the Bronze Age to Early Middle Ages (1000 BC – 1000 AD), with more than 200 settlements. You will be provided with intensive, on-site training in traditional archaeological field methods and analysis, as well the most advanced digital visualization techniques in archaeology: photogrammetry and airborne LiDAR. The excavation is based in the southeast, where you will be immersed in Slovenian culture, language and food, and getting to spend time in the capital, Ljubljana. Please visit: The Wolves and the Caesars: Digital Landscape Archaeology in Slovenia for more information.

SPRING 2022 GLOBAL RELIGIONS

GLOBAL RELIGIONS 102Q2 – WORLD RELIGIONS (3 CR.)

A historical survey of the basic experiential, mythical, doctrinal, ethical, ritual, and social dimensions in the world’s major traditions: tribal religion, Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese and Japanese religions, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students may not receive credit for both Religious Studies 102 and Religious Studies 110.

GLOBAL RELIGIONS 106Q2 – THE BIBLE AND CURRENT EVENTS (3 CR.)

This course introduces the Bible and biblical interpretation by focusing on the role of the Bible in shaping culture and public discourse on key issues in public and foreign policy, general interest, and popular culture, such as church/state relations, abortion, domestic violence,  ‘family values’, welfare reform, same-sex marriage, and recent conflicts in the Middle East.

GLOBAL RELIGIONS 110 – HONORS: WORLD RELIGIONS (3 CR.)

Similar in content to Religious Studies 102, with an emphasis on class participation and the addition of a term paper. Prerequisites: Enrolled in good standing with The Honors College with prior or concurrent enrollment in HNRS 175.  Students may not receive credit for both Religious Studies 102 and Religious Studies 110.

GLOBAL RELIGIONS 164– RELIGION AND NATURE (3 CR.)

Examines competing environmental ethics, and the ensuing social conflicts, which result from diverse views about what constitutes proper moral relationships with and obligations toward the natural world. Cross-listed: Global Religions 164/Environmental Studies 164. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

GLOBAL RELIGIONS 263Q2 – WOMEN, SUSTAINABILITY, RELIGION (3 CR.)

We all live in bodies, and we all live on the planet Earth. This class explores how women from diverse religious traditions have approached the question of how to live sustainably on this planet, as well as how religious approaches to sustainability affect women’s lives. We will assess this through units on four themes: 1) Wonder and Nature, 2) Food, 3) People and Bodies, and 4) Myth and Ritual. Cross-listed: Religious Studies 263/Women’s and Gender Studies 263. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

GLOBAL RELIGIONS 265 – WOMEN AND RELIGION (3 CR.)

This course introduces you to women’s religious experiences in a wide variety of world traditions. We will gain an appreciation for diverse religious traditions and learn how these movements manifest “on the ground.” By learning “religious literacy,” we will have the grounding to examine how gender is performed in specific contexts, and how texts and practices intertwine with both inequity and empowerment. Our work this term will bring together local and global examples in order to prepare you for thoughtful global citizenship throughout and beyond your UW Oshkosh career. Cross-listed: Religious Studies 265/Women’s and Gender Studies 265. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses.

GLOBAL RELGIONS 339 – HINDU MYTH AND RITUAL (3 CR.)

Working within the diversity of the Hindu tradition and beyond the stereotypical mysticism that Westerners often attribute to this tradition is a vibrant current of mythic narratives and ritual performances. In this class we will look at the various ways that Hindu myths and rituals serve as integral components of the daily lives of Hindu people and will take up such issues as how Hindus properly worship images, how Hindu deities can take on human form, and why the goddess Durga slays the buffalo demon. Cross-listed: Anthropology 339/Global Religions 339. Students may receive credit for only one of the cross-listed course.

FALL 2022 ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTHROPOLOGY 123Q1- CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US (3 CR.)

An analytical and descriptive survey of selected cultures representative of major American ethnic groups.

ANTHROPOLOGY 202 – INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4 CR.)

Physical anthropology is the study of the human biology and behavior in the framework of evolution. This course provides an introduction to the scientific approaches and methods used by physical anthropologists, including evolutionary theory and the mechanisms of heredity, the ecology and behavior of nonhuman primates and what they can teach us about human origins, the fossil evidence for human evolution, and modern human variation and adaptation. Students should leave this class with a broader understanding of humanity’s place in nature and a grasp of our unique evolutionary history. Special fees may apply.

ANTHROPOLOGY 204 – CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3 CR.)

Focusing on the concept of ‘culture’, the course discusses the aims, methods, and achievements of anthropological research and presents a general model for comprehending human society.

ANTHROPOLOGY 206 – INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3 CR.)

A study of language as it relates to human culture and the transmission of culture. Genetic and typological variation in language; theories of linguistic universals and relativity. Consideration of social stratification, multidialectal and multilingual societies, selection of national languages.

ANTHROPOLOGY 208 – INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY (3 CR.)

An introduction to the study of humanity’s past, and how archaeologists retrieve, process, analyze and interpret surviving prehistoric materials. Special course fee of $10 applies.

ANTHROPOLOGY 225Q3 – CELEBRATING CULTURE THROUGH THE ARTS (3 CR.)

This course will focus on community engagement with people of diverse ethnic groups utilizing anthropological approaches to visual art, music, and dance. In the course, students will examine how people of various cultural and ethnic backgrounds communicate through visual art, music, and dance about issues such as gender, family, identity, tradition, historical consciousness, ideology, experience, and more. At the same time, students will learn about anthropological approaches to art and performance, how art illuminates diverse cultures, and how knowledge of culture facilitates deeper understanding of the arts. In addition, the class will explore art and performance as experiential modes of learning that go beyond verbal and written means. As part of this process, students will learn about how anthropologists work with people, especially through ethnographic methods. These purposes converge in the students’ engagement in diverse peoples and arts in the local community. Prerequisites: Quest I and Quest II. (Quest III when offered). Special course fee of $15 applies. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 300 – TOPICS IN ANTHRO  (3 CR.)

A variable topics course covering a theme of current interest in anthropology.  Each time the course is offered, the topic and number of credit hours will be announced in the Schedule of Classes.  May be repeated with different content.

001- Digital Methods in Anthropology. Introduction to the ways anthropologists use digital technologies in our work across all subdisciplines. *Please contact the department chair if you would like this course to count towards your Methods Requirement for Anthropology Majors.

002- Anthropology and Education

ANTHROPOLOGY 301 – READING THEORY (3 CR.)

This is a mid-level theory course designed to prepare students to read and analyze theory in Anthropology. The topics and instructors are variable, however, the goal is to understand theory, both in broad concept and in particular cases. Prerequisites: Two of the following courses: Anthropology 202, 204, 206, or 208; or consent of instructor.  TOPIC FOR FALL 2022: Gender & Anthropology

ANTHROPOLOGY 374 – HUMAN OSTEOLOGY (3 CR.)

This course focuses on the human skeleton and the data it provides forensic anthropologists, paleoanthropologist, and archaeologists. Skeletal and dental anatomy is covered in detail, with special attention given to anthropologically important aspects of specific bones and teeth. Students will also learn how to recover bone from forensic and archaeological contexts, recognize bone fragments, estimate age-at-death, sex and biological affinity from skeletal elements, diagnose bone pathologies, collect metric data, and identify trauma. The information covered in this course is the foundation for future studies in bioarchaeolgy, paleoanthropology, and forensic anthropology. Prerequisite: Anthropology 202 or consent of instructor. Cross-listed: Anthropology 374/ Criminal Justice 374. Students may receive credit for only one of the cross-listed courses.

J-TERM (JANUARY INTERIM) 2023

ANTHROPOLOGY 304- WRITING FOR THE SOCIAL SCIENCES (3 CR.)

This course focuses on developing skills in writing, especially for research in the social sciences. In the course, students proceed through writing based assignments that target specific skills including: identifying thesis statements, arguments, and evidence; developing research questions and thesis statements; completing a literature review and identifying project’s contributions and significance; building strong arguments; evaluating, summarizing, and synthesizing information from different sources; supporting arguments with evidence; citation; distinguishing voice, and strengthening argument through organization and language. In this way, the course targets developing transferable writing skills that students may use in any research project. Each student will be able to tailor this course to their specific interests by choosing, in consultation with the instructor, paper topics and readings through which they will explore and develop their research and writing skills.

FALL 2022 GLOBAL RELIGIONS

GLOBAL RELIGIONS 102Q1 – WORLD RELIGIONS (3 CR.)

A historical survey of the basic experiential, mythical, doctrinal, ethical, ritual, and social dimensions in the world’s major traditions: tribal religion, Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese and Japanese religions, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students may not receive credit for both Religious Studies 102 and Religious Studies 110.

GLOBAL RELIGIONS 110 – HONORS: WORLD RELIGIONS (3 CR.)

Similar in content to Religious Studies 102, with an emphasis on class participation and the addition of a term paper. Prerequisites: Enrolled in good standing with The Honors College with prior or concurrent enrollment in HNRS 175.  Students may not receive credit for both Religious Studies 102 and Religious Studies 110.

GLOBAL RELIGIONS 123Q1– RELIGION AND THE OTHER (3 CR.)

This course will use novels and films to observe the ways that we in the West have thought and written about other people and places. Focusing on the religions of Asia and the Middle East, we will not only question the stereotypes we will have inherited, but we will also consider, for example, how Americans can be fascinated with Hindu yoga and Buddhist meditation while harboring an intense fear of Islam.

GLOBAL RELIGIONS 210 – CHRISTIANITY (3 CR.)

The principal forms and traditions of Christianity from the first century to the present with emphasis on essentials of Christian thought.

GLOBAL RELIGIONS 222 – BUDDHISM (3 CR.)

An introduction to how Buddhists throughout the Buddhist tradition in India, Southeast Asia, Tibet and Central Asia, China, Korea, Japan, and the West understand the world, experience their religion, and apply it to society and culture.