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College of Nursing

PROGRAM CONTACT INFORMATION

Brent MacWilliams
Director: Post-Licensure Programs
Office: Clow Graduate Suite-230 F
Telephone: (920) 424-2106
Website: uwosh.edu/con/graduate/
Email: congrad@uwosh.edu

Bonnie Nickasch
Director: BSN-DNP-Family Nurse Practitioner Emphasis
Office: Clow Graduate Suite-230 E
Telephone: (920) 424-2227
Website: uwosh.edu/con/graduate/bsn-to-dnp-program/
Email: congrad@uwosh.edu

Kathy Wren
Director: BSN-DNP-Nurse Anesthesia Emphasis
Office: Clow Graduate Suite-230 D
Telephone: (920) 424-2121
Website: uwosh.edu/con/graduate/bsn-dnp-crna-emphasis/
Email: concrna@uwosh.edu

FACULTY

Allar, Ausloss, Bailey, Basler, Brands, Collier, Condit, Cooley, Edwards, Elertson, Englund, Friess, Gobis, Gutman, King, Lehr, Lynch, MacWilliams, McNiel, Menet, Mott, Nickasch, Olson, Park, Pascarella, Pichlemeyer, Pitsch, Schmidt, Schmitt, Smolinski, Strojny, Strube, Walrath, Westphal, K. Wren, T. Wren, Veltus

PURPOSE

Vision: The College of Nursing will build upon its tradition of developing caring and scholarly nurse leaders who positively impact contemporary and future health care.

The purpose of the graduate program is to prepare professional nurses for the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) and Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degrees. MSN emphases include the Nurse Educator and Clinical Nurse Leader. The DNP emphases include the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) and Nurse Anesthesia. The Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) to DNP FNP emphasis prepares FNPs with a primary care focus. The BSN to DNP Nurse Anesthesia emphasis prepares students to provide anesthesia services to a diverse population. The Master’s to DNP Program prepares advanced practice nurses and advanced nurse administrators for a practice role with a more comprehensive focus on population health, leadership, evidence-based practice, and technology. The MSN to DNP with FNP emphasis prepares nurses who have master’s degrees in another area of nursing to become FNPs. There are also post-MSN Clinical Nurse Leader and Nurse Educator Certificate Programs and a post-baccalaureate Healthcare Informatics Certificate Program.

DEGREES/CERTIFICATES

Completion of the program will lead to the degrees: Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) or Doctor of Nursing Practice (D.N.P.)

Completion of specific courses will lead to the certificate:

Clinical Nurse Leader
Nurse Educator
Healthcare Informatics

ADDITIONAL ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS INFORMATION

In addition to the requirements of the Office of Graduate Studies specified in the POLICIES section of this Bulletin, the program has the following policies and procedures for admission:

Grade-Point Average

MSN: A grade-point average (GPA) of 3.00 in undergraduate studies is required. Students who have less than a 3.00 GPA can appeal and may be admitted on a probationary status.
BSN to DNP: A GPA of 3.00 in undergraduate studies is required. GRE required for applicants with a GPA of 2.70-2.99.
Master’s to DNP and MSN to DNP with FNP emphasis: A GPA of 3.50 in graduate studies is required.

Written Screening
Applicants are asked to provide a written response to a practice-focused question that focuses on professional aspects related to the chosen graduate emphasis.

Interview
Qualified applicants may be interviewed after application materials and the written screening are evaluated. Due to the competitive nature of admission processes, applicants should understand that meeting the minimum standards does not guarantee admission into a program. Also, applicants will be screened and the most qualified individuals will be invited for an interview.

Resume
Applicants must submit a professional resume including certification(s) held and professional affiliations and activities. Master’s to DNP applicants provide a supplemental application that includes a portfolio.

Licensure/Degree
MSN: Applicants must hold a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing from a CCNE or ACEN (formerly NLNAC) accredited program and licensure as a registered nurse in the state of residence and be eligible for Wisconsin licensure. Nursing practice is helpful but not required. Individual consideration may be given for graduates from non-accredited nursing programs, if the institution is regionally accredited.

BSN to DNP: Applicants must hold a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing from a CCNE or ACEN (formerly NLNAC) accredited program and licensure as a registered nurse in the state of residence and be eligible for Wisconsin licensure. For FNP emphasis nursing practice is helpful but not required. For the Nurse Anethesia emphasis, 1 year of current full time (or part time equivalent) critical care nursing experience in the United States, its territories or a US military hospital is required. Two years of critical care experience and CCRN certification are preferred. Applicants for the Nurse Anesthesia emphasis must also possess a current, unencumbered Wisconsin license to practice as a registered nurse.

Master’s to DNP: Applicants must hold a Master’s degree from an accredited program, RN licensure in the state of residency and be eligible for Wisconsin licensure, and hold national certification as an Advanced Practice Nurse or advanced nurse administrator.

MSN to DNP with FNP emphasis: Applicants must hold a Master’s degree from an accredited program, RN licensure in the state of residency and be eligible for Wisconsin licensure.

References
Applicants must provide three references from professional and/or work-related sources.

Prior Coursework

MSN: Applicants must have earned a B or higher in an undergraduate three (3) credit introductory statistics course that includes both descriptive and inferential statistics within five years of admission to the program.
BSN to DNP: Applicants must have earned a B or higher in an undergraduate three (3) credit introductory statistics course that includes both descriptive and inferential statistics within five years of admission to the program. For the Nurse Anesthesia emphasis, applicants must have completed 8 credits of anatomy and physiology with labs, 8 credits of inorganic and organic chemistry, 3-4 credits of microbiology, and 3-4 credits of pharmacology.
Master’s to DNP: Applicants must have earned a B or higher in an undergraduate three (3) credit introductory statistics course that includes both descriptive and inferential statistics within five years of admission to the program. Prior coursework required is listed on the College of Nursing website supplementary application. 550 clinical hours of prior advanced practice or administration practice is necessary.
MSN to DNP with FNP emphasis: Applicants must have earned a B or higher in an undergraduate three (3) credit introductory statistics course that includes both descriptive and inferential statistics within five years of admission to the program.

Computer Competency
Students are expected to have experience with a word processing program, sending and receiving emails, and accessing the World Wide Web. Each student is given a campus e-mail account with 24-hour computer access. All official communication from the program is sent via campus e-mail to students’ UW Oshkosh account. Technology requirements for UW Oshkosh students can be found at: it.uwosh.edu/students/

Health and CPR Requirements, Caregiver Background Checks, Liability Insurance
Students must meet health and CPR requirements and have a caregiver background check performed upon admission to the programs. Nurse Anesthesia emphasis students must possess current BLS, ACLS, and PALS certifications. Contact the Graduate Nursing Office for a list of immunization requirements. Clinical agencies and the College of Nursing may refuse entry into clinical experience if requirements are not met. Liability insurance will be provided by the College of Nursing to all students in the Nurse Educator, Clinical Nurse Leader, and FNP emphases, enrolled and engaged in the curriculum for all clinical practicum experiences. Contact the Graduate Nursing Office for questions related to liability insurances for programs not listed above.

SUMMARY

A. Structure

The MSN Program is comprised of courses that contribute to specialty as a Nurse Educator or Clinical Nurse Leader.

The BSN to DNP FNP emphasis is comprised of courses that lead to a doctoral degree in nursing practice and an advanced practice nursing specialty as a Family Nurse Practitioner.

The BSN to DNP Nurse Anesthesia emphasis is comprised of courses that lead to a doctoral degree in nursing practice and an advanced practice nursing specialty as a Nurse Anesthetist.

The Master’s to DNP Program is comprised of courses that lead to a doctoral degree in nursing practice.

The MSN to DNP Program with FNP emphasis is comprised of courses that lead to a doctoral degree in nursing practice and an advanced practice nursing specialty as a Family Nurse Practitioner.

Program requirements must be completed within a five-year period, starting with the first course taken that counts toward the degree, regardless of the date of admission to the program.

B. Academic Plans of Study
The following are the descriptions for the nursing plan(s) of study:
Nursing – MSN – Nurse Educator
Nursing – MSN – Clinical Nurse Leader
Nursing – BSN to DNP Family Nurse Practitioner emphasis
Nursing – BSN to DNP Nurse Anesthesia emphasis
Nursing – Master’s to DNP
Nursing – MSN to DNP with FNP emphasis
Certificate – Post-MSN Clinical Nurse Leader; Post-MSN Nurse Educator; Post-Baccalaureate Healthcare Informatics.

C. Minimum Credit Requirements
The minimum credit requirements:

MSN Nurse Educator – 37 credits
MSN Clinical Nurse Leader – 37 credits
BSN to DNP Family Nurse Practitioner emphasis – 74 credits
BSN to DNP Nurse Anesthesia emphasis- 74 credits
Master’s to DNP – 30 credits
MSN to DNP with FNP emphasis – variable credits depending on prior MSN coursework
Post MSN Clinical Nurse Leader Certificate – 12 credits
Post MSN Nurse Educator Certificate – 11 credits
Post-baccalaureate Healthcare Informatics Certificate – variable credits depending on healthcare background.
The graduate program curriculum undergoes continuous quality improvement. Contact the Graduate Nursing Program Office for information regarding specific minimum credit requirements and changes.

D. Admission to Candidacy
Students must satisfy fully the Office of Graduate Studies requirements for advancement to candidacy as stated in the POLICIES section of this Bulletin. Students must confer with their program coordinator/advisor to plan and receive program approval for their admission to candidacy. Students should apply for Admission to Candidacy after completing 9-21 credits. The Office of Graduate Studies gives final approval to Admission to Candidacy.

E. Graduation Requirements
Completion of a clinical paper, DNP Scholarly Project, or other culminating experience (based on plan of study) in addition to all other required degree courses as determined by the program. Candidates must satisfy all program and Office of Graduate Studies academic, culminating, and degree requirements to be eligible for graduation and degree conferral.

F. Audit/Guest Student/Special Student Policy
No auditing is allowed for graduate clinical courses. Very limited audit status is allowed in graduate theory courses for those students who have earned a Master’s degree. For eligible students, audit status is open on a space-available basis and with permission of the Post Licensure Programs Director and the course instructor. Students (i.e., admitted to a graduate program at another institution) classified as Special Students at UW Oshkosh, will be allowed to enroll for graduate theory courses after permission from the Post Licensure Programs Director and documentation of full-standing admission at their home institution must be provided. Permission will be granted on a space-available basis. Credits earned while a Special Student are intended for transfer credit. However, should students be subsequently admitted into the UW Oshkosh Graduate Program, the five-year completion time limit begins with the first course applicable to the degree. Special student classification is limited.

G. Grading and Class Size Policies

Progression requirements include the policy that a grade of B or higher must be earned in each nursing course. One course may be repeated if a grade lower than a B is earned without a formal appeal. A second course with a grade lower than a B requires appeal to the Graduate Program Committee.

Course offerings are dependent on adequate course enrollment.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Master of Science of Nursing (MSN)

The MSN curriculum for Clinical Nurse Leaders and Nurse Educators is comprised of components modeled after guidelines from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing Masters Essentials of Nursing Education and Clinical Nurse Leader Competencies, the National League of Nursing Nurse Educator Core Competencies, and the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses Graduate Competencies.

MSN Graduate Core Courses:

Nursing
701 3 Translational Scholarship
702 3 Health Care Systems Policy and Advocacy
703 3 Clinical Prevention and Population Health
704 3 Pathophysiology for Advanced Nursing Roles
709 3 Pharmacotherapeutics for Advanced Nursing Roles
719 3 Foundations of Advanced Nursing Roles and Interprofessional Collaboration
745 2 Advanced Health Assessment for Clinical Nurse Leaders and Nurse Educators
746 2 Quality Improvement and Safety
783 3 Healthcare Informatics

MSN Specialty Courses for Clinical Nurse Leader Emphasis

Nursing
757 2 Clinical Nurse Leader Practicum II
759 3 Clinical Leader Immersion Practicum
761 2 Clinical Nurse Leader Practicum I
762 2 Leadership in the Clinical Nurse Leader Role
763 3 Quality in the Clinical Nurse Leader Role
Graduates are eligible to sit for the Commission on Nurse Certification Clinical Nurse Leader Certification Examination.

MSN Specialty Courses for Nurse Educators

Nursing
736 3 The Education Process in Nursing
737 1 Nurse Educator Practice Advancement
738 4 Advanced Educator Practicum
748 3 Assessment and Evaluation Strategies in Nursing Education
793 1 Culminating Experience
Graduates are eligible to sit for the National League for Nursing Nurse Educator Certification Examination.

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)-BSN to DNP

The BSN to DNP curriculum is comprised of components modeled after guidelines from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice, the National Task Force on Quality NP Education, and the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties, and the Council on Accreditation Practice Doctorate Standards for Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Programs.

BSN-DNP Core Courses:

Nursing
701 3 Translational Scholarship
702 3 Health Care Systems Policy and Advocacy
704 3 Pathophysiology for Advanced Nursing Roles
709 3 Pharmacotherapeutics for Advanced Nursing Roles
729 3 Advanced Health Assessment
800 3 Foundations of the DNP Role and Interprofessional Collaboration
801 3 Philosophical, Theoretical and Ethical Foundations for Advanced Nursing Practice
803 3 Advanced Epidemiology and Biostatistics for Population Health
804 1 DNP Scholarly Project I
805 3 Clinical Scholarship for Advanced Nursing Practice
806 1 DNP Scholarly Project II
808 1 DNP Scholarly Project III
810 1 DNP Scholarly Project IV
809 3 Organizational Leadership and Health Policy for Advanced Nursing Practice
883 3 Healthcare Informatics

DNP Specialty Courses for Family Practitioner Emphasis:

Nursing
700 3 Advanced Diagnostics and Reasoning
703 3 Clinical Prevention and Population Health
716 3 Clinical Management and Pharmacology I
717 3 Clinical Management and Pharmacology II
718 3 Clinical Management and Pharmacology III
720 1 Pediatric Seminar for the APN
722 2 Diversity Practicum
726 2 FNP Practicum I
727 4 FNP Practicum II
728 4 FNP Practicum III
730 3 Clinical Practice Management
829 6 DNP Residency
Graduates are eligible to sit for the American Nurses Credentialing Center or American Association of Nurse Practitioners FNP Certification Examination.

DNP Specialty Courses for Nurse Anesthesia Emphasis* in addition to the Core:

Biology

729 1 Anatomy

730 4 Advanced Human Physiology

Nursing

830 3 Pharmacotherapeutics for Advanced Nursing Roles II

831 3 Basic Principles of Anesthesia and Lab

832 3 Advanced Principles of Anesthesia I

833 3 Advanced Principles of Anesthesia II

834 3 Advanced Principles of Anesthesia III

835 3 Physics, Equipment and Technology, and Adv. Chemistry Concepts for the Nurse Anesthetist

836 1 Professional Aspects of Nurse Anesthesia Practice

837 1 Professional Aspects of Nurse Anesthesia Practice II

838 1 Professional Aspects of Nurse Anesthesia Practice II

839 1 Clinical Practica I

840 1 Clinical Practica II

841 1 Clinical Practica III

842 2 Clinical Practica IV

843 2 Clinical Practica V

844 2 Clinical Practica VI

845 2 Clinical Practica VII

Graduates are eligible to sit for the National Board of Certification and Recertification for Nurse Anesthetists National Certification Examination.

*Emphasis will be offered pending accreditation approval from the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs.

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)-MSN to DNP with FNP Emphasis

The MSN to DNP with FNP emphasis curriculum is comprised of components modeled after guidelines from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing Essentials for Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice, the National Task Force on Quality NP Education, and the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties.

MSN to DNP with Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Emphasis

Nursing

704 3 Pathophysiology for Advanced Nursing Roles*
709 3 Pharmacotherapeutics for Advanced Nursing Roles*
729 3 Advanced Health Assessment*
800 3 Foundations of the DNP Role and Interprofessional Collaboration
801 3 Philosophical, Theoretical & Ethical Foundations for Advanced Nursing Practice
803 3 Advanced Epidemiology and Biostatistics for Population Health
804 1 DNP Scholarly Project I
805 3 Clinical Scholarship for Advanced Nursing Practice
806 1 DNP Scholarly Project II
808 1 DNP Scholarly Project III
809 3 Organizational Leadership and Health Policy for Advanced Nursing Practice
810 1 DNP Scholarly Project IV
883 3 Healthcare Informatics

DNP Specialty Courses for MSN to DNP with FNP Emphasis

Nursing

700 3 Advanced Diagnostics and Reasoning
716 3 Clinical Management and Pharmacology I
717 3 Clinical Management and Pharmacology II
718 3 Clinical Management and Pharmacology III
720 1 Pediatric Seminar for the APN
722 2 Diversity Practicum
726 2 FNP Practicum I
727 4 FNP Practicum II
728 4 FNP Practicum III
730 3 Clinical Practice Management
829 6 DNP Residency
883 3 Healthcare Informatics
* Requirements may be included depending on prior master’s level coursework

Graduates are eligible to sit for the American Nurses Credentialing Center or the American Association of Nurse Practitioner Certification Examination

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)-Master’s to DNP
The Master’s to DNP curriculum is comprised of components modeled after guidelines from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing Essentials for Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice.

Master’s to DNP for Certified Advanced Practice Nurses and Advanced Administrators

Nursing

800 3 Foundations of the DNP Role and Interprofessional Collaboration
801 3 Philosophical, Theoretical & Ethical Foundations for Advanced Nursing Practice
803 3 Advanced Epidemiology and Biostatistics for Population Health
805 3 Clinical Scholarship for Advanced Nursing Practice
809 3 Organizational Leadership and Health Policy for Advanced Nursing Practice
821 4 DNP Seminar & Practicum I
822 5 DNP Seminar & Practicum II
883 3 Healthcare Informatics
890 3 DNP Scholarly Project

Graduate Certificate Programs

Post MSN Clinical Nurse Leaders Certificate Program*

Nursing
746 2 Quality Improvement and Safety
757 2 Clinical Nurse Leader Practicum II
759 3 Clinical Leader Immersion Practicum
761 2 Clinical Nurse Leader Practicum I
762 2 Leadership in the Clinical Nurse Leader Role
763 3 Quality in the Clinical Nurse Leader Role
*Requirements may include coursework in Advanced Physical Assessment, Advanced Pharmacology, and Advanced Pathophysiology depending on prior master’s level coursework.

Graduates are eligible to sit for the Commission on Nurse Certification Clinical Nurse Leader Certification Examination.

Post MSN Nurse Educator Certificate Program*

Nursing
736 3 The Education Process in Nursing
737 1 Nurse Educator Practice Advancement
738 4 Advanced Educator Practicum
748 3 Assessment and Evaluation in Nursing Education
*Requirements may include coursework in Advanced Physical Assessment, Advanced Pharmacology, and Advanced Pathophysiology depending on prior master’s level coursework.

Graduates are eligible to sit for the National League of Nursing Nurse Educator Certification.

Admission Requirements for Post-MSN Clinical Nurse Leader and Nurse Educator Certificate Programs

Master’s degree in nursing from an ACEN (formerly NLNAC) CCNE accredited program. MSN coursework must show evidence of courses in Advanced Health Assessment, Advanced Pathophysiology, and Advanced Pharmacology. Individual consideration may be given to graduates of graduate nursing programs that were not accredited at the time of graduation.
Students will apply to the program using the online application system for the graduate program. The Office of Graduate Studies will evaluate transcripts and send a recommendation to the College of Nursing Graduate Office related to meeting the minimum GPA requirement.
Current licensure as a registered nurse in the state of residence.
Two letters of reference from professional and/or work related sources.
Nursing practice experience recommended.
A personal interview

Post Baccalaureate Healthcare Informatics Certificate Program*

Nursing
768 3 Data Systems, Analysis and Design
769 3 Project Management and Methodology
777 3 Health Information Integration
778 2 Healthcare Informatics Capstone Project
783 3 Healthcare Informatics
Students without a healthcare background will also take:

Nursing
767 2 Introduction to the Healthcare Environment
Students not working in a healthcare informatics related field will also take:

Nursing
779 1-4 Healthcare Informatics Capstone
*Credits (14-19) and course load are variable dependent upon student’s prior background in healthcare and desire for certification.

Nursing students are eligible to sit for the American Nurses Credentialing Center Nursing Informatics Certification Examination.

Admission Requirements for Post-baccalaureate Healthcare Informatics Certificate program.

Minimum of a bachelor’s degree from an accredited program (it is not necessary to have a degree in nursing, but those who seek to be certified in Nursing Informatics must have a bachelor’s degree in nursing).
Minimum 3.0 GPA in undergraduate program.
Students will apply to the program using the online application system for the graduate program. The Office of Graduate Studies will evaluate transcripts and send a recommendation to the College of Nursing Graduate Office related to meeting the minimum GPA requirement.
Two letters of reference attesting to ability to complete graduate level courses (same reference form used for College of Nursing graduate student applicants).
The College of Nursing Graduate Program Director will evaluate admission materials and make recommendations to the Graduate Program Committee and the Dean.

Non-Degree CHOICES and Requirements
Graduate Achievement Program (GAP)

PRIMARY HEALTHCARE GRADUATE ACHIEVEMENT PROGRAM

The Graduate Achievement Program in Primary Healthcare Nursing is designed for people who already have a master’s degree in nursing but wish to add a different area of nursing specialization. GAP applicants will be accommodated as class size permits. A minimum of 31 credits are required.

Admission Requirements

Master’s degree in nursing from a National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) or Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) accredited program. Individual consideration may be given to graduates of graduate nursing programs that were not accredited at the time of graduation.
Current licensure as a registered nurse in Wisconsin.
Three letters of reference from professional and/or work related sources.
Nursing practice experience recommended.
A personal interview
An acceptable health assessment course with a lab or equivalent in the past two years, receiving a B or higher grade or validated use of all health assessment skills. Written exam (pass rate 85%) and performance exam to validate correct use of health history and physical exam skills. Written and demonstration exam has a fee.
For the Skill Enhancement GAP option, ANCC, AANP, or NAPNAP certification as a pediatric nurse practitioner or adult nurse practitioner is required.

Program Requirements

Family Nurse Practitioner GAP Skill Expansion Option: Skill expansion option, designed for master’s prepared nurse administrators, educators, and clinical nurse specialists, is based on the Family Nurse practitioner curriculum. Credit for comparable courses will be evaluated individually. Contact the Graduate Nursing Office for information.

Skill Enhancement Option: Two tracks are available to assist pediatric nurse practitioners (who would take the mature family track) and Adult Nurse Practitioners (who would take the young family track) to acquire competency in caring for families.

FNP GAP Courses, Skill Expansion Option (31 Credits)

Nursing
700 3 Advanced Health Assessment
703 3 Health Promotion in Advanced Nursing
704 3 Pathophysiology for the APN
707 2 Epidemiology
709 3 Pharmacotherapeutics for the APN
716 2 Clinical Management and Pharmacology I
717 3 Clinical Management and Pharmacology II
718 3 Clinical Management and Pharmacology III
726 2 FNP Practicum I (Clinical)
727 4 FNP Practicum II (Clinical)
728 4 FNP Practicum III (Clinical)
Young Family Track (12 credits in track; other GAP credits required.)

Nursing
750 6 Primary Healthcare for the Young Family I
751 6 Primary Healthcare for the Young Family II
Mature Family Track (12 credits in track; other GAP credits required.)

Nursing
752 6 Primary Healthcare for the Mature Family I
753 6 Primary Healthcare for the Mature Family II
Certification Requirements

Graduates of the Family and Adult Nurse Practitioner curriculum meet the FNP and ANP eligibility requirements of the certification centers, ANCC and AANP. Educators and Clinical Nurse Leaders are eligible for certification exams in their specialty.

COURSE OFFERING(S)

Nursing 700

3 (crs.)

Advanced Diagnostics and Reasoning

This course builds on basic health assessment skills acquired in N605 with emphasis on the decision-making processes to differentiate normal from abnormal health status. Data collection methods include comprehensive and problem-focused history and physical examination assessments; health risk appraisal, developmental assessment; family and social assessment; advanced physical assessment skills and common diagnostic procedures. Clinical experience includes laboratory practice and health assessment and promotion application in health care settings. Prerequisites: Nursing 605 and 704. (2+1)

Nursing 701

3 (crs.)

Translational Scholarship

The course introduces students to the skills needed to analyze and apply research and other evidence in health care and advanced nursing practice. The course highlights identification of relevant practice problems, application of appropriate theoretical foundations, clinical judgment, and ethical guidelines to improve nursing practice and health outcomes for individuals and populations. The importance of interdisciplinary teams in applying evidence to support practice and policy changes is addressed. Pre or Co requisite: Nursing 719 or Nursing 800.

Nursing 702

3 (crs.)

Health Care Systems Policy and Advocacy

In this course students develop their ability to recognize, analyze and articulate health care policy within an advanced nursing framework. The focus is on the social, cultural, technological, ethical and economic dynamics impacting health policy from a global and organizational perspective.

Nursing 703

2 – 3 (crs.)

Clinical Prevention and Population Health

In this course, students will analyze and evaluate interdisciplinary models of clinical prevention. Students will explore population-based approaches to promoting health and become familiar with ecological, global, and social determinants of health, principles of genetics and genomics and epidemiologic data analysis.

Nursing 704

3 (crs.)

Pathophysiology for Advanced Nursing Roles

This course will critically examine the physiological and pathophysiological reaction of the body to alterations in biological processes throughout the life span. Focus will be on the knowledge required in advanced nursing practice to identify actual and potential health problems. A conceptual approach will be used to analyze the metabolic, infectious, immunologic, degenerative and neoplastic alterations at the cellular and organ levels.

Nursing 705

2 (crs.)

Research in Nursing – Methods

This course identifies problems relevant to healthcare and nursing through acquisition of increased understanding of the research process. Students discuss critical analysis, utilization, implementation, and communication of research in healthcare settings. The course emphasizes the development of skills necessary to conduct and analyze nursing research.

Nursing 706

2 (crs.)

Research in Nursing – Design

In this course, students develop methodological plans for the study of problems relevant to primary health care nursing within a theoretical and scientific framework. Students discuss qualitative and quantitative research design. Students explore issues related to diversity in nursing research. Students acquire the skills needed to plan, initiate, and analyze nursing research studies. Students are required to design an acceptable research proposal. Prerequisite: Nursing 705 or consent of the instructor.

Nursing 707

2 (crs.)

Epidemiology

This course prepares students to use concepts and methods in the study of disease etiology and in the planning and evaluation of health services. The course emphasizes the interpretation of indices for community health, morbidity and mortality rates, sensitivity and specificity of screening and diagnostic measures, and risk factor analysis. Students become acquainted with population-based approaches to the analysis of health data.

Nursing 708

2 (crs.)

Ethics in Advanced Nursing Practice

Perspectives on the analysis of moral dilemmas in primary health care and advanced nursing practice. Application of bioethical principles to health care nursing dilemmas. Differentiation among methods of dilemma resolution (principlism, casuistry, etc.) in advanced nursing practice. Incorporation of the analysis of emerging moral dilemmas for advanced nurses (genetic testing, on-line health care records, etc.).

Nursing 709

3 (crs.)

Pharmacotherapeutics for Advanced Nursing Roles

This course is a comprehensive study of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs used in the promotion and maintenance of health across all physiologic systems throughout the life span. Emphasis is on the role of the advanced practice nurse in the pharmacotherapeutic management of patients in primary health care. Prerequisite: Dependent on program.

Nursing 710

2 (crs.)

Theoretical Basis for Family Nursing

This course provides the theoretical foundations for advanced practice in family nursing. Students analyze the theoretical and empirical bases for understanding families in various cultural and developmental contexts. Students examine selected theoretical frameworks for understanding families and family health and compare them in terms of their utility for nursing practice and research. Students examine universal family processes of attachment and care giving across cultural contexts. Students investigate current theories of family stress and crises as well as the impact of selected situational and developmental crises of family health and development. Students address the link between the state of family science, nursing research, and advanced practice in family nursing.

Nursing 711

2 (crs.)

Theory in Nursing

In this course students examine perspectives on the analysis and critique of models and theories developed by nurse theorists within the context of the nursing metaparadigm, as well as theories from other disciplines. Students apply theories and models to primary health care and discuss implications for nursing research, practice, education, and administration.

Nursing 716

3 (crs.)

Clinical Management and Pharmacology I

This is the first of three sequential courses on clinical management that builds on a health promotion/disease prevention framework for a holistic approach to primary health care. Students expand their knowledge base of physiology and pathophysiology, and pharmacology. The course emphasizes critical thinking processes to establish clinical judgment. Students discuss appropriate natural/alternative and pharmacological therapies, diagnostic and educative management strategies, and outcome criteria for commonly encountered acute and chronic conditions involving the respiratory, genitourinary, and endocrine system as well as women’s health, gynecological, ophthalmology, and otology conditions seen by Family Nurse Practitioners in primary health care. Prerequisites: Nursing 700, 704 and 709. Co-requisite: Nursing 726.

Nursing 717

3 (crs.)

Clinical Management and Pharmacology II

This is the second of three sequential courses on clinical management for the family nurse practitioner that continues a holistic approach to advanced primary health care acknowledging age, gender, sexuality, cultural heritage, family and community needs. Students continue to expand their knowledge of physiology, pathophysiology and pharmacology. The course emphasizes the critical thinking processes to establish a clinical judgment from possible differential diagnoses. Students discuss natural/alternative health care and pharmacotherapeutics, as well as diagnostic and educative management strategies, and outcome criteria appropriate for the commonly encountered acute and chronic conditions of the cardiovascular, renal, integumentary, gastrointestinal, and hematological systems seen by Family Nurse Practitioners in primary health care. Prerequisites: Nursing 716 and 726. Corequisite: Nursing 727.

Nursing 718

3 (crs.)

Clinical Management and Pharmacology III

This is the third of three sequential courses on clinical management for the family nurse practitioner that continues a holistic approach to advanced primary health care acknowledging age, gender, sexuality, cultural heritage, family and community needs. Students continue to expand their knowledge of physiology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and their critical thinking processes. Students discuss natural/alternative health care and pharmacotherapeutics, as well as diagnostic and educative management strategies and outcome criteria appropriate for clients with commonly encountered acute and chronic conditions of the psychological, neurological, musculoskeletal systems as well as pain management, addiction and other selected topics. Prerequisites: Nursing 717 and 727. Corequisite: Nursing 728.

Nursing 719

3 (crs.)

Foundations of Advanced Nursing Roles and Interprofessional Collaboration

In this course students examine theory and models of advanced nursing roles and interprofessional collaboration. Theoretical foundations are applied to advanced nursing roles, within and ethical and cultural context, as they relate to education, conflict management, and leadership to improve health outcomes. Special fees may apply.

Nursing 720

1 (crs.)

Pediatric Seminar for Advanced Practice Nurses

This elective pediatric seminar focuses on the advanced practice nurse role with child-rearing families and pediatric conditions and issues. The course provides a review of growth and development and anticipatory guidance, an update on immunization requirements, and management of common acute and stable chronic pediatric health problems. Management includes routine advanced practice care including natural, alternative, and complementary therapies and pharmacological treatments. Prerequisites: Nursing 716

Nursing 722

2 (crs.)

Diversity Practicum

A diversity clinical practicum with adjunct faculty in a primary care setting to gain skill in working with individuals, families, or communities from a diverse cultural/ethnic background. (Minimum 112 clinical hours) Prerequisites: Nursing 709 and 726. Special fees may apply.

Nursing 726

2 (crs.)

Family Nurse Practitioner Practicum I

This course provides the initial clinical preceptorship in a primary care setting. Focus is on practicing health assessment skills and establishing therapeutic relationships with clients and collegial relationships with other providers. (Minimum 112 clinical hours) Prerequisite: Nursing 700 and 704 and 709. Special fees may apply.

Nursing 727

4 (crs.)

Family Nurse Practitioner Practicum II

A clinical practicum following Nursing 726 in a family practice primary care setting. Students focus on developing skills in health assessment, health promotion, and collaborative health care management. (Minimum 224 clinical hours) Prerequisites: Nursing 726. Special fees may apply.

Nursing 728

4 (crs.)

Family Nurse Practitioner Practicum III

This is the final clinical preceptorship in a family practice primary health care setting. The course focuses on greater responsibility and accountability in managing care of clients of all ages as well as family groups. Collaborative management of acute and chronic problems for the complex client/family with multi-system problems is presented. Community/Epidemiology health issues are addressed collaboratively with longer-term planning, research application, practice evaluation and consultation in a variety of settings. (Minimum 224 clinical hours) Prerequisites: Nursing 727. Special fees may apply.

Nursing 729

3 (crs.)

Advanced Health Assessment

Identification of health status of the individual at all ages through history, interview, physical examination; recognition of differences in physiological function and psychosocial behavior; assessment of developmental stages of the individual and relationship to family unit; exploration of collaborative role development by nurse and physician in primary health care delivery. Special course fees may apply.

Nursing 730

3 (crs.)

Clinical Practice Management

This course synthesizes the practitioner, administrator, educator, researcher, and consultant role components inherent in managing clinical practice in various health care settings. Management functions of planning, organizing, directing/influencing, and evaluating the delivery of primary care services will be discussed. Prerequisite: Nursing 702

Nursing 736

3 (crs.)

The Education Process in Nursing

In this course, students integrate theoretical foundations of adult learning theory, leadership theory, quality and safety, communication, and others to teaching and learning in varied educational settings. Students explore the roles and functions of nurse educators as teachers and scholars. The course focused on needs assessments, course and curriculum development, innovative instructional technologies, and interactive nature of teaching. Ethical principles in education are applied. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Graduate Nursing Program Educator emphasis or consent of instructor.

Nursing 737

1 (crs.)

Nurse Educator Practice Advancement

In this course, nurse educator students will expand their clinical practice knowledge and experiences beyond the baccalaureate level. Students develop their clinical expertise in a selected area of specialty practice including hospital, clinic, or community settings. Special fees may apply.

Nursing 738

1 – 4 (crs.)

Advanced Educator Practicum

In this course, students explore the teaching role of the nurse educator incorporating prior learning to classroom, online, lab, or the clinical environment. Theoretical and scientific underpinnings for practice are used to socialize students into the nurse educator role. Emphasis is on developing and teaching modules, units, courses, or programs in health care or educational settings. Students devise strategies to assess and evaluate learning. Principles of change and leadership are applied using research and other evidence to improve teaching and learning. This 4 credit practicum includes faculty/student seminar time. (Minimum 224 clinical hours) Prerequisites: Nursing 736 and 748. Special fees may apply.

Nursing 740

3 (crs.)

Information Systems: Patient Care Technology

This course emphasizes data management to analyze and improve health outcomes through computer technology application. Emphasis is on synthesizing health data related to selected topics to identify health education and practice needs of various populations in order to assess and evaluate safety and quality factors related to care. Legal, ethical and cultural considerations are expanded as they relate to information management and its use in health care. Prerequisites: Graduate student standing or consent of instructor and Nursing 451 or an equivalent course or proficiency in using word processing, spreadsheet and presentation software. Proficiency in using cross platform operating systems (Windows or Mac), competence in web browsing and using e-mail are necessary by passing a pre-course test.

Nursing 745

2 (crs.)

Advanced Health Assessment for CNLs and NEs

This course builds upon basic health assessment with emphasis on decision-making process related to normal and abnormal health status. Emphasis is on comprehensive data collection including health risk appraisal, developmental assessment, family and social assessment, and advanced physical assessment relevant to the Clinical Nurse Leader and Nurse Educator roles. Practice experiences will occur under the direction of academically and experientially qualified preceptors and faculty. Students will analyze and synthesize assessment data to plan care for patients or populations of interest. Special course fees may apply.

Nursing 746

2 (crs.)

Quality Improvement and Safety in Advanced Nursing

This course focuses on quality and safety to improve outcomes by identifying and reducing actual or potential failures in healthcare processes or systems. Quality improvement models will be addressed focusing on a just culture of safety. Use of national patient safety resources, initiatives, regulations, and benchmarks will be discussed. High reliability organizational principals are explored as they relate to promoting transparency and sustaining improvements. Prerequisite: None

Nursing 748

3 (crs.)

Assessment and Evaluation Strategies in Nursing Education

This course focuses on systematic evaluation of curriculum at all levels (didactic, clinical, and program) addressing cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains. Concepts underlying evaluation methods and test construction, design, use, administration, and interpretation are explored. Evaluation and testing strategies in the traditional classroom and online environment, and clinical and lab settings are addressed. Ethnical principles, as well as research and other evidence, are applied to evaluation of learning. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Graduate Nursing Program Educator emphasis or consent of instructor.

Nursing 750

6 (crs.)

Primary Health Care for the Young Family I

Focus is on health maintenance and disease management regarding issues germane to the young family (childbearing, child rearing, or child anticipating families). Contains content regarding health assessment, diagnosis and management of risk factors and illnesses commonly experienced by young families. Clinical practice arranged by the student with faculty input. Prerequisite: Admission to Program.

Nursing 751

6 (crs.)

Primary Health Care for the Young Family II

Focus is on disease management of less common and more complex health issues germane to the young family. Contains content regarding collaboration with specialists and other members of the interdisciplinary team. Clinical practice arranged by the student with faculty input. Prerequisite: Nursing 733.

Nursing 752

6 (crs.)

Primary Health Care for the Mature Family I

Focus is on health maintenance and disease management regarding germane to the mature family (families with late adolescent, older, or no children). Contains content regarding health assessment, diagnosis and management of risk factors and illnesses commonly experienced by mature families. Clinical practice arranged by the student with faculty input. Prerequisite: Admission to the Program.

Nursing 753

6 (crs.)

Primary Health Care for the Mature Family II

Focus in on disease management of less common and more complex issues germane to the mature family. Contains content regarding collaboration with specialists and other members of the interdisciplinary team. Prerequisite: Nursing 731.

Nursing 754

2 (crs.)

Advanced Practice Nursing Practicum I

This course provides the initial clinical preceptorship in an adult advanced practice nursing setting. Focus is on practicing health assessment skills, establishing therapeutic relationships with clients and collegial relationships with other health professionals. Prerequisite: Nursing 700. Corequisite: Nursing 709 and 764.

Nursing 755

4 (crs.)

Advanced Practice Nursing Practicum II

This is the second clinical preceptorship course in an adult advanced practice nursing setting. Students continue refinement of health assessment skills. Students engage in health promotion and collaborative health care management for adult clients. Prerequisite: Nursing 709 and 764. Corequisite: Nursing 765.

Nursing 756

4 (crs.)

Advanced Practice Nursing Practicum III

This is the final clinical preceptorship course in an adult advanced practice nursing setting. The course focuses on greater responsibility and accountability in managing care of adult clients. Students engage in collaborative management of acute and chronic problems for the complex client including multi-system conditions. Prerequisite: Nursing 755 and 765. Corequisite: Nursing 766.

Nursing 757

2 (crs.)

Clinical Nurse Leader Practicum II

This clinical practicum emphasizes the application of CNL leadership and critical thinking to organizing, planning, coordinating, implementing, evaluating, and sustaining high quality evidence-based care in the clinical setting. Individual and aggregate data at the microsystem level will be used to work with the interdisciplinary team to plan and develop a quality improvement project. Techniques for communicating with the interdisciplinary team will be enhanced. (Minimum 112 clinical hours) Prerequisites or Corequisites: Completed Nursing 761, Clinical Nurse Leader Role; completed or concurrent enrollment in Nursing 762, Leadership in the Clinical Nurse Leader Role. Special fees may apply.

Nursing 758

2 (crs.)

Clinical Nurse Leader Clinical Practicum III

This clinical practicum emphasizes the utilization of evidenced-based information and clinical skills to enhance leadership and management expertise and facilitate holistic healing for clients, their families and the community. Students analyze outcomes of healing interventions and facilitate, coordinate, and/or manage the provision of healing care by multidisciplinary health care members. (Minimum 112 clinical hours) Prerequisite or Corequisites: Nursing 707, Epidemiology; Nursing 757, CNL Practicum II; Nursing 760, Healing Care.

Nursing 759

1 – 5 (crs.)

Clinical Nurse Leader Immersion Practicum

This clinical practicum will allow the student to enact the CNL role and competencies in an organization at the microsystem level. Students perform interdependent and independent activities to carry out projects based on microsystem assessment and organizational initiatives. Students are accountable for evaluating and disseminating clinical outcomes in professional values in development as a transformational leader. (Minimum of 300 clinical hours.) Prerequisites: All CNL specialty courses must be completed prior to Immersion Practicum. Special fees may apply.

Nursing 760

3 (crs.)

Healing Care

This course emphasizes the provision of healing practices, comfort, and the control of pain/discomfort for clients with an array of diagnoses. Definitions, theories and concepts related to healing, pain, comfort and palliative care are discussed. The myths surrounding comfort and healing practices are addressed. Leadership in healing care will be stressed including leadership of the interdisciplinary team and the ability to be a change agent. Healing and comfort care management practices will include conventional interventions and natural/alterative/complementary (NAC) practices. Prerequisites: Nursing 700, Adv. Health Assessment; Nursing 704, Pathophysiology. Prerequisites/corequisites: Nursing 709, Pharmacotherapeutics.

Nursing 761

2 (crs.)

Clinical Nurse Leader Practicum I

This practicum focuses on application of quality and outcome content in clinical practice and introduction to the CNL role. A major emphasis of the course is working with an interdisciplinary team to complete a comprehensive assessment of a select clinical microsystem and its care and processes. The student will design and/or further develop care processes and patterns, blend organizational initiatives to improve quality and safety, and develop fiscal, legal, ethical, and other metrics to evaluate care and processes. Clinical conferences will support student reflection on the introduction to CNL role. (Minimum 112 clinical hours.) Prerequisites or Corequisites: Nursing 763: Quality in the CNL Role. Special fees may apply.

Nursing 762

2 (crs.)

Leadership in the Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) Role

This course examines leadership and improvement science theories, practices, and strategies in the CNL role for planning, managing, delivering, and sustaining high quality care. Processes involved in analysis of clinical outcomes will be explored including coordination of care; communication; education of staff, patients, and others; and will be considered to improve care at all levels. Prerequisites or Corequisites: Completed Nursing 761, Clinical Nurse Leader Practicum I; Nursing 763, Quality in the Clinical Nurse Leader role.

Nursing 763

3 (crs.)

Quality in the Clinical Nurse Leader Role

This course examines the fundamental knowledge and skills Clinical Nurse Leaders need to increase their capacity to assess and improve their workplace and the care provided there. The course focuses on leading an interdisciplinary team to attain higher levels of performance in safety and risk management; quality and outcomes; care coordination and patient centered care; efficient use of human and environmental resources; and patient and professional satisfaction. Models for microsystem development and process re-design, blending evidence and organizational strategy as hallmarks for practice change will be addressed.

Nursing 764

2 (crs.)

Adult Clinical Management and Pharmacology I

This is the first of three sequential courses on the clinical management that builds on a health promotion/disease prevention framework for a holistic approach to advanced nursing with adults. Students expand their knowledge of physiology and pathophysiology. The course emphasizes the critical thinking process to establish clinical judgment. Students discuss natural/alternative and pharmacological therapies, diagnostic and educative management strategies, and outcome criteria for adult conditions of the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and reproductive systems. Prerequisite: Nursing 700, 703, and 704. Corequisite: Nursing 709 and 754

Nursing 765

2 (crs.)

Adult Clinical Management and Pharmacology II

This is the second of three sequential courses on clinical management for the adult advanced practice nurse that continues a holistic approach acknowledging age, gender, sexuality, cultural heritage, family and community needs. Students continue to expand their knowledge of physiology and pathophysiology. The course emphasizes the critical thinking process to establish clinical judgment from possible differential diagnosis. Students discuss natural/alternative and pharmacological therapies, diagnostic and educative management strategies, and outcome criteria for adult conditions of the cardiovascular, genitourinary, musculoskeletal, integumentary and hematological systems. Prerequisite: Nursing 709, 754 and 764. Corequisite: Nursing 755.

Nursing 766

2 (crs.)

Adult Clinical Management and Pharmacology III

This is the third of three sequential courses on clinical management for the adult advanced practice nurse that continues a holistic approach acknowledging age, gender, sexuality, cultural heritage, family and community needs. Students continue to expand their knowledge of physiology and pathophysiology. The course emphasizes the critical thinking process to establish clinical judgment from possible differential diagnosis. Students discuss natural/alternative and pharmacological therapies, diagnostic and educative management strategies, and outcome criteria for adult conditions of the endocrine, psychological and neurological systems; ophthalmology, otology, pain management, basic urgent care management and other selected topics. Prerequisite: Nursing 755 and 765. Corequisite: Nursing 756.

Nursing 767

2 (crs.)

Introduction to Healthcare Environment

This course focuses on the American healthcare system with an overview of reimbursement and regulatory issues. Healthcare terminology is introduced following an overview of bodily systems. Key elements of the electronic health record are addressed, including health history and physical, diagnosis, and treatment. The concepts of evidence-based practice and meaningful use are introduced. Prerequisite: Accepted into Healthcare Informatics Certification Program or consent of instructor.

Nursing 768

3 (crs.)

Data Systems, Analysis and Design

In this course, database theory, database design, and administration are addressed. Database systems are studied in the context of their use in clinical information systems and infrastructures for electronic health records. This will include design, development, administration, and use of database systems to support information systems and decision-making. In addition, monitoring related to healthcare quality and patient-centered outcomes are addressed for various settings in order to enhance care processes and monitoring. Prerequisite: Accepted into Healthcare Informatics Certificate Program or consent of instructor.

Nursing 769

3 (crs.)

Project Management and Methodology

This course focuses on leadership principles to navigate change within complex healthcare organizations. Organizational behavior is addressed along with motivational strategies for communication, teamwork, and conflict management and resolution. Students learn strategies associated with Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). Students also learn successful strategies for creating request for proposals and evaluation of vendor responses. Graduate student standing or consent of instructor.

Nursing 770

1 (crs.)

Introduction to Natural Alternative Complementary (NAC) Health Care

The Introduction to NAC Care module provides an overview of the history, theory, philosophy, and ethics of NAC. There is also a brief description and review of holistic nursing principles.

Nursing 771

2 (crs.)

Alternative Health Care Systems

The Alternative Health Care Systems module provides an overview of health care systems outside the conventional western allopathic system. Basic principles of health care are provided. Examples to be used include, but are not limited to: Homeopathy, Naturopathy, Ayurveda, Native American Medicine, and Traditional Chinese Medicine. Prerequisite: Nursing 770 (or Co-Requisite)

Nursing 772

2 (crs.)

Mind Body Spirit Interventions

The Mind Body Spirit Interventions module provides an overview of techniques and processes that can affect mind body spirit function and symptoms. Several of the following modalities will be covered including affirmation, bibliotherapy, biofeedback, breathing techniques, centering, hypnosis, imagery/visualization, meditation, prayer, relaxation, and therapies that use creative outlets such as art, music, dance, or writing. Prerequisite: Nursing 770 (or Co-requisite)

Nursing 773

1 (crs.)

Biologic Based Therapies

The Biologic Based Therapies module provides an overview of vitamins, minerals, herbs, aromatherapy and other nutritional supplements such as shark cartilage, melatonin, DHEA, amino acids and other nutrients. Prerequisite: Nursing 770 (or Co-requisite)

Nursing 774

1 (crs.)

Manipulative and Body Based Methods

Manipulative and body-based methods module provides an overview of massage modalities and basic principles of chiropractic and osteopathy. Prerequisite: Nursing 770, (or Co-requisite)

Nursing 775

1 (crs.)

Energy Therapies

The energy therapies module provides an overview of biofield and bioelectromagnetic therapies: Biofield therapies are intended to affect energy fields that surround and penetrate the human body and environment. The existence of such fields has not yet been scientifically proven. Some forms of energy therapy manipulate biofields by applying pressure and/or manipulating the body by placing the hands in, or through, these fields. Examples include qi gong, Reiki, Healing Touch and Therapeutic Touch. Bioelectromagnetic-based therapies involve the unconventional use of electromagnetic fields, such as pulsed fields, magnetic fields, or alternative current or direct current fields. Light and color therapy are also included in this area. Prerequisite: Nursing 770, (or Co-requisite)

Nursing 776

2 (crs.)

NAC Therapies Field Project & Seminar

The NAC Therapies Field Project & Seminar is a culminating project synthesizing the NAC theory content. The course includes group seminars for “putting together” the year-long program, as well as discussion and completion of a clinical project, research project, integrated review of literature or other approved project in a NAC topic area. A final paper in the form of a publishable article is the expected outcome. Prerequisites: Nursing 770, 771, 772, 773, 774, and 775.

Nursing 777

3 (crs.)

Health Information Integration

This course focuses on integrating informatics within healthcare systems and organizations along with the complexity associated with health information exchange. Key elements of legal, ethical, and regulatory standards are addressed. Security threats, risks, and policies to protect stakeholders are addressed. Concepts related to business and finance are included, building on knowledge of project management. Accepted into Healthcare Informatics Certification Program or consent of instructor.

Nursing 778

2 (crs.)

Healthcare Informatics Capstone Project

Students apply informatics knowledge to complete a culminating project which includes application to a practical problem and critical evaluation of the project. Goals will be developed and outcomes measured related to applicability to the healthcare setting. Accepted into Health Care Informatics Certificate Program or consent of instructor.

Nursing 779

1 – 4 (crs.)

Healthcare Informatics Practicum

Nursing students who will sit for Informatics Certification will jointly plan a practicum experience with the course instructor, and qualified preceptor, to complete one of the following practice hour requirements to meet certification requirements:

Have practiced a minimum of 2,000 hours in informatics nursing within the last 3 years.

Have practiced a minimum of 1,000 hours in informatics nursing in the last 3 years and completed a minimum of 12 semester hours of academic credit in informatics courses that are part of a graduate-level informatics nursing program.

Have completed a graduate program in nursing informatics containing a minimum of 200 hours of faculty-supervised practicum in informatics. Prerequisite: Completed all Healthcare Informatics Certificate courses (N767) (if needed), N783, N768, N769, N777). Can be concurrently enrolled in N 778.

Nursing 783

2 – 3 (crs.)

Health Care Informatics

This course will focus on developing the skills to effectively use information technology to promote optimal outcomes for patients. Content is directed toward assisting students to understand the relationship between the current state of medical and nursing science information, and to become leaders in dealing with health care management systems. The course focuses on navigating and interpreting the vast amount of online knowledge and examples of standardized nomenclature. Students will be able to use this information to enhance their own knowledge as well as function as a practice specialist/consultant sharing that knowledge base to information management and its use in health care. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing or consent of instructor.

Nursing 793

1 (crs.)

Clinical Paper

The culminating experience provides students an opportunity to synthesize and apply theoretical knowledge and practicum experiences gaining in their area of specialization. Additional fees may be associated with enrollment in this course if culminating experience is not completed upon completion of all other MSN coursework. Department consent required. Pass/Fail course.

Nursing 794

0 (crs.)

MSN Culminating Experience Continuation Course

The course is linked to the MSN culminating experience course (N793 MSN Culminating Experience) taken by graduate students as they work on their culminating project for degree completion. Students must be continuously enrolled in the course once they have completed all coursework but are still working to complete the MSN culminating project. This is a 0-credit course with an associated fee comparable to one graduated credit. Prerequisite: Completion of coursework and continued enrollment (“In Progress”) in Nursing 793.

Nursing 795

1 – 6 (crs.)

Nursing Thesis

Each registration with a maximum accumulation of 6 cr. A culminating experience option in the master’s program. Prerequisite: Thesis Proposal and Advisor Approval Form must be filed with the Graduate School. Pass/Fail course.

Nursing 796

1 – 3 (crs.)

Independent Study

Each registration with maximum accumulation of 6 cr. Individualized study in area of interest with the direction of a faculty member. Open to master’s program students who submit Independent Study Topic and Instructor Approval Form at or prior to registration.

Nursing 797

1 – 3 (crs.)

Seminar on Current Topics in Primary Health Care Nursing

Current topics in Primary Health Care Nursing are offered. Course content is expected to differ from offering to offering. Prerequisites: Admitted to MSN Program and consent of instructor. Pass/Fail course.

Nursing 799

0 (crs.)

Registration for Comprehensive Examination

Pass/Fail course.

Nursing 800

3 (crs.)

Foundations of the DNP Role and Interprofessional

In this course students examine the roles and responsibilities of the DNP emphasizing effective practice and interprofessional collaboration. Theoretical concepts from nursing and other disciplines guide the exploration of health and health care delivery are applied to the DNP role integrating practice inquiry and advanced practice. Prerequisite: None. Special fees may apply.

Nursing 801

3 (crs.)

Philosophical, Theoretical & Ethical Foundations for Advanced Nursing Practice

Course will focus on inquiry into the philosophical and theoretical perspectives and foundations of the discipline. Paradigms in nursing will be examined in relation to advanced nursing practice. Strategies for theory development will be addressed. Advanced nursing practice will be studied in the context of complex clinical, business, legal, ethical, and system issues that confront individual recipients of care, families, health care professionals, organizations, and society. Prerequisite: Dependent on program.

Nursing 803

3 – 4 (crs.)

Advanced Epidemiology and Biostatistics for Population Health

Epidemiologic research and concepts are synthesized and applied to clinical and population based health to best identify and analyze the determinants of health, health promotion and risk reduction strategies, and to evaluate the distribution of health conditions. Epidemiological, biostatistical, and other scientific approaches are used to analyze population data to better understand determinants of health and illness. Prerequisite: Dependent on program.

Nursing 804

1 (crs.)

DNP Scholarly Project I

This is the first in a series of four courses that will guide the student in the completion of the DNP scholarly project. During this course, the student will identify and work with their DNP scholarly project chair to form a DNP scholarly project committee, refine the PICO (T) question, and problem statement that will be addressed in the DNP scholarly project. Emphasis will be on development of a sound rationale for the project, justified by a thorough review of the context in which the project will take place and a synthesis of relevant literature on the topic (Minimum 56 practice hours) Prerequisite: Nursing 701.

Nursing 805

3 – 4 (crs.)

Clinical Scholarship for Advanced Nursing Practice

Course will focus on the elements of advanced clinical scholarship. Content will include evidence-based practice processes, the translation of research into practice, the evaluation of practice, activities aimed at improving health care practice and outcomes, and participation in collaborative research. Principles of information technology will be integrated and applied to advanced nursing practice. Prerequisite: Nursing 800; Dependent on program.

Nursing 806

1 (crs.)

DNP Scholarly Project II

This is the second in a series of four courses focused on the developing and implementing the DNP scholarly project. During DNP Scholarly Project II, students develop the proposal for the DNP scholarly project, including problem recognition, needs assessment, goals and objectives, theoretical underpinnings and plans for evaluation. Sources of funding will be explored and IRB applications completed. At the conclusion of DNP Scholarly Project II, students submit their proposals to their DNP scholarly project committee for approval. (Minimum 56 practice hours) Prerequisite: Nursing 804 DNP Scholarly Project I.

Nursing 808

1 (crs.)

DNP Scholarly Project III

This is the third in a series of four courses focused on the implementation of the DNP scholarly project. During this course, students will work with their scholarly project committee to conduct their project. DNP Scholarly Project III will focus on implementation of the Capstone project within a practice setting. (Minimum 56 practice hours). Prerequisite: Nursing 806 DNP Scholarly Project II

Nursing 809

3 (crs.)

Organizational Leadership and Health Policy for Advanced Nursing Practice

Course will focus on the systematic collection of information about the activities, characteristics, and outcomes of programs to improve health care and inform future programmatic decisions. Emphasis is placed on the strategies used in needs assessment and implementation of effective health care interventions, programs and policies. This course prepares the advanced nursing professional to respond to current realities and provide enhanced leadership for future policy development and professional practice. Prerequisite: Dependent on program.

Nursing 810

1 (crs.)

DNP Scholarly Project IV

This is the final course in a series of four courses in which students finalize and disseminate their DNP scholarly project. During this course, students will work with their DNP scholarly project committee to complete the project, evaluate project outcomes and disseminate results. (Minimum 56 practice hours) Pass/Fail course. Prerequisite: Nursing 808.

Nursing 821

4 (crs.)

DNP Seminar & Practicum I

This is the first of two seminar/practica combining advanced nursing practice clinical/system focus and seminar discussion. Seminar and practicum will focus on collaboration of inter-professional teams and the roles of advanced nursing within the collaboration. Accountability for advancing leadership in advanced nursing clinical practice and contributing to the developing body of nursing practice knowledge will be emphasized. Addresses advocacy at all levels of health care policy implementation. This experience provides additional opportunities for practice expertise development and work with a target population and/or a complex health care environment. (Minimum 224 clinical hours). Prerequisites: Nursing 809, co-requisite; Nursing 803, and Nursing 883 or consent of instructor. Special course fees may apply.

Nursing 822

5 (crs.)

DNP Seminar & Practicum II

This is the second of two advanced nursing practice seminars and practica. The purpose of this course is to build upon knowledge and skills acquired and refined in DNP Seminar and Practicum I. Students will refine leadership skills related to outcomes, measurements, and quality initiatives within the student’s work environment. Seminar and practicum will focus on the development, implementation and evaluation of culturally-sensitive approaches to improve health status/access patterns and address gaps in care of populations within local, national, or global communities. (Minimum 280 clinical hours). Prerequisites: Nursing 821, DNP Seminar & Practicum I. Special course fees may apply.

Nursing 829

6 (crs.)

DNP Residency

In this course, students will synthesize previous learning in the practice environment in an immersion experience. Students will use practice opportunities to expand their leadership influence, translate research into practice, further develop clinical skills, and develop Family Practitioner competencies. Students will participate with clinical preceptors in a primary care setting under the supervision of clinical faculty to promote the transition from student role to a doctorally-prepared advanced practice nurse. (minimum 336 clinical hours) Prerequisite Nursing 718. Special fees may apply.

Nursing 830

3 (crs.)

Pharmacotherapeutics for Advanced Nursing Roles II

In this course students will evaluate pharmacology and corresponding physiology pertinent to the delivery of anesthetic care. Selected categories of drugs commonly used for the induction and maintenance of anesthesia, as well as additional adjunct drugs used for cardiopulmonary support and pain control are analyzed. Prerequisite: Nursing 709

Nursing 831

3 (crs.)

Basic Principles of Anesthesia and Lab

In this course students will examine a variety of basic concepts needed to begin to assess patients pre-operatively for an anesthetic, and manage their care intra-operatively and post-operatively. The lab will complement the lectures.

Nursing 832

3 (crs.)

Advanced Principles of Anesthesia I

In this course students will demonstrate the administration and management of anesthesia to patients requiring special considerations. Anatomy and physiology principles that relate to the practice of anesthesia, as well as other important areas requiring knowledge in the administration of anesthesia, will be analyzed and applied. Principles of anesthetic management outside of the operating room (endoscopy, MRI, EP lab, ECT, ICU, cancer treatment, interventional radiology), burns, eye surgery, anaphylaxis/immunosuppressed patients, the elderly, patients with rare co-existing diseases, neuromuscular disorders, malignant hyperthermia, robotics, and trauma will be explored. Labs will complement the lecture material. Prerequisites: Nursing 831 and Nursing 835.

Nursing 833

3 (crs.)

Advanced Principles of Anesthesia II

In this course students will examine fundamental concepts essential to clinical anesthesia practice in the obstetric and pediatric populations and the theoretical and practical aspects of acute and chronic pain management. Prerequisite: Nursing 832.

Nursing 834

3 (crs.)

Advanced Principles of Anesthesia III

In this course students will examine the administration and management of anesthesia to the neurosurgical patient. The renal, hepatic and endocrine systems as they relate to the practice of anesthesia will be reviewed, as well as other important areas requiring knowledge in the administration of anesthesia. Principles of anesthetic management outside of the operating room and trauma will be examined. Prerequisite: Nursing 833

Nursing 835

3 (crs.)

Physics, Equipment and Technology, and Advanced Chemistry Concepts for the Nurse Anesthetist

In this course students will examine the basic chemistry and physics essentials to the safe delivery of anesthetic care. Additional emphasis is placed on the understanding of the functioning and relevant physical laws governing the use of the equipment required in the delivery of anesthesia.

Nursing 836

1 (crs.)

Professional Aspects of Nurse Anesthesia Practice I

In this course students will examine the importance of personal wellness and stress management for the nurse anesthesia student and the practicing CRNA. The student will become familiar with complementary and alternative modalities used to create wellness and balance. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the multiple factors related to chemical dependency and substance abuse in the profession. Students will also explore the importance of cultural sensitivity and diversity in healthcare. Prerequisite: Admission into the CRNA emphasis.

Nursing 837

1 (crs.)

Professional Aspects of Nurse Anesthesia Practice II

In this course students will analyze the business practice of anesthesia, legal aspects, the professional association and councils, and policies as they relate to the practice of anesthesia. Prerequisite: Nursing 836.

Nursing 838

1 (crs.)

Professional Aspects of Nurse Anesthesia Practice III

In this course students will examine wellness and chemical dependency as it relates to the issues faced by anesthesia providers. Prerequisite: Nursing 837.

Nursing 839

1 (crs.)

Clinical Practica I

This course is the first of seven practicum courses in the CRNA emphasis. Students will focus on administration of anesthesia for selected patients. Emphasis is on the application of basic principles of general anesthesia; patient assessment; preparation of anesthesia equipment and drugs; development of patient-specific anesthesia care plans; and basic airway management in supervised settings. Prerequisites: Nursing 709 and 729, Co-requisites: Nursing 830 and 831.

Nursing 840

1 (crs.)

Clinical Practica II

This course is the second of seven practicum courses in the CRNA emphasis. Students will focus on achieving increased responsibility in planning, managing, and implementing patient specific anesthesia care plans for difficult procedures. Prerequisite: Nursing 839.

Nursing 841

1 (crs.)

Clinical Practica III

This course is the third of seven practicum courses in the CRNA emphasis. Students will focus on specialty rotations in obstetrics, pediatrics, and neurology. Students begin taking call and assume increased responsibility for anesthetic management for patients with higher acuity. Prerequisite: Nursing 840.

Nursing 842

2 (crs.)

Clinical Practica IV

This course is the fourth of seven practicum courses in the CRNA emphasis. Students will focus on specialty rotations in cardiac, obstetric, and pediatric anesthesia. Students demonstrate progress towards achieving the terminal objectives for entry-level competency in anesthesia practice. Prerequisite: Nursing 841.

Nursing 843

2 (crs.)

Clinical Practica V

This course is fifth of seven practicum courses in the CRNA emphasis. Students will focus on specialty rotations in cardiac, obstetric and pediatric anesthesia. Focus is on internalization of theoretical concepts in applying and managing all types of patients and procedures, and achieving the terminal objectives for entry-level competency in anesthesia practice. Prerequisite: Nursing 842.

Nursing 844

2 (crs.)

Clinical Practica VI

This course is the sixth of seven practicum courses in the CRNA emphasis. Students will focus on internalization of theoretical concepts in applying and managing all types of patients and procedures, and achieving the terminal objectives for entry-level competency in anesthesia practice. Prerequisite: Nursing 843.

Nursing 845

2 (crs.)

Clinical Practica VII

This course is the final of seven practicum courses in the CRNA emphasis. Students will continue to focus on internalization of theoretical concepts in applying and managing all types of patients and procedures, and achieving the terminal objectives for entry-level competency in anesthesia practice. Prerequisite: Nursing 844.

Nursing 883

2 – 3 (crs.)

Health Care Informatics

This course will focus on developing the skills to effectively use information technology to promote optimal outcomes for patients. Content is directed toward assisting students to understand the relationship between the current state of medical and nursing science information, and to become leaders in dealing with health care management systems. The course focuses on navigating and interpreting the vast amount of online knowledge and examples of standardized nomenclature. Students will be able to use this information to enhance their own knowledge as well as function as a practice specialist/consultant sharing that knowledge base to information management and its use in health care. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing or consent of instructor.

Nursing 890

3 (crs.)

DNP Scholarly Project

This is the culminating experience for the DNP student designed as a specialized advanced nursing practice field project. This project is designed as a clinical scholarship project allowing students to demonstrate expertise in practice and will be individualized based on student’s prior experience and projected career goals. The DNP scholarly project integrates the role of the DNP in a comprehensive health care environment that includes utilization of leadership, consultation, advocacy, and collaboration. In-depth work with experts from nursing and other disciplines will be incorporated to provide opportunities for meaningful student engagement in the health care environment. (Minimum 56 clinical hours) Prerequisites: Nursing 801, 803, 805 and 809.

Nursing 892

0 (crs.)

DNP Scholarly Project Continuation

This is a continuation of the culminating experience for the DNP student designed as a specialized advanced nursing practice field project. This project is designed as a clinical scholarship project allowing students to demonstrate expertise in practice and will be individualized based on student’s prior experience and projected career goals. The DNP scholarly project integrates the role of the DNP in a comprehensive health care environment that includes utilization of leadership, consultation, advocacy, and collaboration. In-depth work with experts from nursing and other disciplines will be incorporated to provide opportunities for meaningful student engagement in the health care environment. Prerequisite: Nursing 890 DNP Scholarly Project or Nursing 810 DNP Scholarly Project IV

Nursing 896

1 – 3 (crs.)

Independent Study in Nursing

Each registration with maximum accumulation of 3 credits. Individualized study in area of interest with the direction of a faculty member. Open to doctoral program students who submit Independent Study Topic and Instructor Approval form at or prior to registration. Department Consent Required.