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PROGRAM CONTACT INFORMATION

Christine Roth, Program Director
Office: Radford Hall 207
Telephone: (920) 424-7287
Web Site: www.uwosh.edu/english/graduate-program
E-mail: roth@uwosh.edu

FACULTY

Animashaun, Baker, Baybrook, Boehler, Cole, Crawford, Dingledine, Dunckel, Foss, Haynes, Helmers, Hostetler, Klemp, Landry, Looker, Maguire, Manning, McCabe, Mueller, Ngaboh-Smart, Ochonicky, Pesta, Rindo, Roth, Shaffer

PURPOSE

The Master of Arts in English Program is designed to train, develop, and professionalize individuals seeking an advanced degree in English. M.A. students will be expected to complete coursework that deepens and enriches their understanding of literature, linguistics, creative writing, and rhetoric and composition studies. Besides training broadly across the discipline, students will focus their writing and research in a specific area or subject matter in order to fulfill the department’s thesis requirement: a sustained, research-based project that marks the culmination of the graduate experience. The Department of English strives to offer a diverse assortment of graduate classes each semester, including courses available at times accessible to non-traditional students, as well as summer and hybrid offerings, some of which include online components. While full-time enrollment is encouraged, part-time enrollments are common, allowing motivated students to complete a graduate degree while employed. Completion of the terminal degree of Master of Arts in English creates well-rounded researchers, scholars, and teachers prepared to enter PhD programs in English or to pursue a wide range of endeavors including education, law, medicine, government, publishing, and business.

DEGREES/CERTIFICATES

Completion of the program will lead to the degree: Master of Arts (M.A.)

Completion of specific courses will lead to the certificate:

Creative Writing
New Literatures

ADDITIONAL ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS INFORMATION

In addition to the requirements of the Office of Graduate Studies specified in the first section of this Bulletin, the program has established the following policies and procedures for admission:

Full Standing
Admission with full standing to the Master of Arts in English Program requires that applicants have the following:

A baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution.
Official undergraduate transcript(s), documenting an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0 (4.0 scale).
Proficiency in reading, writing and speaking in standard English form(s).

Probationary Admission
Applicants who show promise but lack adequate undergraduate preparation may, at the discretion of the Master of Arts Committee, be admitted on probationary status and will be expected to take graduate-level course(s) specified by the program. If, at the end of one academic year following probationary admission, a student does not successfully complete such courses, then he or she is no longer considered a Master of Arts in English student and must reapply to the English Program in order to be considered for re-entry. Contact the Graduate Studies Office for information about reapplication.

Conditional Admission
Applicants who meet Graduate Studies full standing criteria but have not taken the required Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test may be admitted conditionally. If, at the end of one academic year following conditional admission, a student does not complete the GRE general test, then he or she is no longer considered a Master of Arts in English student and must reapply in order to be considered for reentry to the program.

Grade-Point Average
Official undergraduate transcript(s), documenting an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0 (4.0 scale), are required.

References and Standardized Test Scores
Three professional and/or academic reference letters and official scores for the general Graduate Record Examination (GRE) are required.

Personal Statement and Writing Sample
In addition to completing the Graduate Studies application for admission requirements, those wishing to be considered for admission to the Master of Arts in English Program must submit a personal statement and a writing sample from an upper-division university course, which will enable the Master of Arts Committee to determine if candidates have the requisite writing skills to successfully complete the program. Check the program website (uwosh.edu/english/graduate-program/admissions-process-1) for details.

Undergraduate Major
Normally, the baccalaureate will have been taken in English or other English-language-based studies in the humanities (e.g., history, sociology, psychology, education, government). Regardless of undergraduate major, proficiency in speaking, reading and writing in standard English form(s) is required.

SUMMARY

A. Structure
The program is comprised of required and elective courses, culminating in either a creative writing or critical thesis. Students may arrange their own programs within scheduling options to emphasize literature, rhetoric and composition, creative writing or linguistics; however, it will not be possible to work exclusively in any one area. Students are required to take at least two 500- or 700- level cultural studies or literature courses (6 credits), at least one 500- or 700-level rhetoric/composition or linguistics course (3 credits), and at least one 500- or 700-level creative writing course (3 credits). Students interested in formally focusing on creative writing, new literatures, or linguistics are encouraged to review the options for graduate certificates, which students can earn concurrently with their MA degrees.

B. Academic Plans of Study
English is the description for the English plan of study.

C. Minimum Credit Requirements
36 (thirty-six) graduate-level credits, including required English Department courses and elective courses (which can be taken within and outside the English Department for an interdisciplinary experience); and a thesis. At least 18 credits must be at the 700 level. Contact the UW Oshkosh Master of Arts in English Program for more details on required and elective graduate-level credit distribution.

D. Admission to Candidacy
Students must satisfy fully the Office of Graduate Studies requirements for advancement to candidacy as stated in the POLICIES section of this Bulletin. Students must confer with their program coordinator/advisor to plan and receive program approval for their admission to candidacy. Students should apply for Admission to Candidacy after completing 9-21 credits. The Office of Graduate Studies gives final approval to Admission to Candidacy.

Students must be admitted to candidacy before beginning thesis work. Admission to candidacy requires that the student be in full standing, have completed all deficiencies (if applicable), and have filed an Application for Admission to Candidacy Form (formal plan of study). Students are expected to submit a prospectus for the M.A. in English thesis (creative writing thesis or critical thesis) within one semester after reaching the stage of candidacy.

E. Graduation Requirements
Candidates must satisfy all program and Office of Graduate Studies academic, culminating, and degree requirements to be eligible for graduation and degree conferral.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

18 (eighteen) credits of 700-level courses and a maximum of 18 credits from English Department dual-level graduate courses (500 or 600 level) including the following requires courses:

English
581 3 Foundations of Literary Criticism
704 3 Research Methods
795 3 English Thesis

Students are required to take at least two cultural studies courses (6 crs.), at least one rhetoric/composition or linguistics course (3 crs.), and at least one creative writing course (3 crs.). Students may choose from a number of courses in each of these areas.

Students may take up to six (6) credits at the graduate level from other departments at UW Oshkosh. Only three (3) of these non-English graduate credits will be applied at the 700 level. Other non-English credits will be applied at the 500/600 level. With the exception of three required courses, all English 500-, 600- and 700-level courses are available as electives to fulfill the program requirements. Optional content classes, with different subtitles and the signature of the department chair, may be taken twice.

The Thesis Project
Each degree candidate will write a thesis of approximately 60 to 80 pages. It will be a substantial work of original research or empirical study in areas, such as literature, linguistics, rhetoric or creative writing.

Electives
Students are expected to consult first with the program coordinator and later with their thesis adviser and Admission to Candidacy Committee to select electives from among any of the English courses offered at the 500 level or above, excluding 581, 704 and 795.

COURSE OFFERING(S)

English 501

3 (crs.)

Modern Grammars

Intensive study of English grammar, sentence structure and mechanics. Designed for students preparing to teach English and for others who desire to master fundamentals of the language. 301/501

English 503

3 (crs.)

Creative Writing: Fiction I

An elective course designed to provide opportunity for analysis of original student writing through a seminar or workshop approach. Assigned readings of professional fiction as well as selected student samples are offered for in-class discussion and critique. 303/503

English 504

3 (crs.)

Advanced Fiction Writing

A course designed to provide further opportunity for analysis and critique of students’ creative fiction. Class structure, requirements, and assignments are similar to English 303, but greater emphasis is placed on the scope and development of work. Prerequisite: English 303 or consent of instructor. 304/504

English 505

3 (crs.)

Creative Writing: Poetry I

An elective course designed to provide a workshop approach to student writing and analysis. Student poetry is given constructive in-class critique. Requirements include a minimum of one original poem each week and outside reading in contemporary poetry, with attention to form and content. 305/505

English 506

3 (crs.)

Advanced Poetry Writing

A course designed to provide further opportunity, through a workshop approach, for close analysis and critique of student writing. Class structure, requirements, and assignments are similar to English 305, but each student is expected to demonstrate increased proficiencies in the discovery and development of a personal style. 306/506

English 508

3 (crs.)

Autobiography: Theory and Practice

The course is designed to explore the definition and expression of personal identity through the genre of autobiography. There will be three areas of focus: the composition of an autobiography by the students, primary readings of autobiographies, and writing and language theory about the construction of narrative and the representation of the self through writing. 308/508

English 514

3 (crs.)

19th Century American Novel

A study of the American novel between 1800 and 1900, which will include examination of important figures, texts, and themes.

English 517

3 (crs.)

Technical Writing

An elective composition course, designed to develop proficiency in writing technical and scientific reports and articles related to students’ areas of specialization. Recommended by some major departments. Prerequisites: 60 credits or consent of instructor. 317/517

English 519

3 (crs.)

African American Literature II: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Studies may include African American literature of the 18th, 19th, and 20th Centuries, oral tradition poetry, and surrounding cultural materials. 319/519

English 520

3 (crs.)

Special Topics in Linguistics: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. This linguistics course will offer focused work in various areas of linguistics; topics may include (but are not limited to) discourse analysis, linguistic pragmatics, politeness, linguistic profiling, forensic linguistics, issues of language planning (bilingual teaching, etc.), historical linguistics, psycholinguists, and cognitive linguistics. Prerequisites: English 281 or consent of instructor. 320/520

English 522

3 (crs.)

Theories of Rhetoric and Writing

An introduction to the field of rhetoric and composition. Providing an overview of the field, this course will draw on the history, trends, theories, practices, and pedagogical approaches of the discipline of rhetoric and composition. 322/522

English 524

3 (crs.)

Gender in Literature: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the director. A study of literature from various periods illustrating gender roles in their cultural and social contexts.

English 526

3 (crs.)

Studies in Classical Mythology

A survey of Greek and Roman mythology and its influence on Western literature and art.

English 527

3 (crs.)

Detective Fiction

A study of detective fiction in the short story and the novel.

English 529

3 (crs.)

Creative Writing: Playwriting I

A workshop in playwriting, focusing on the distinctive qualities of theatrical representation and the basic skills of dialogue, plot, and collaboration with supporting theater artists. 329/529

English 530

3 (crs.)

Creative Writing: Playwriting II

An advanced workshop in playwriting focusing intensively on student writing with invited feedback from directors, designers, dramaturges, and other writers. Students will complete a one-act play or other proposed project. Prerequisite: English 329 or consent of instructor. 330/530

English 531

3 (crs.)

Contemporary Lit: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Studies in poetry and fiction from the past 25 years. 331/531

English 532

3 (crs.)

Early Women Writers: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. A study of women writers before 1900. The content will vary from term to term, and may include such subjects as Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Early American, Eighteenth and Nineteenth-Century Women Writers.

English 533

3 (crs.)

British Poetry: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. A seminar focusing on the themes, technical innovations, and theories of influential British poets.

English 534

3 (crs.)

Wisconsin in Literature

Studies in Wisconsin literature, legends, and lore.

English 535

3 (crs.)

Personal Narratives: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Studies may include biographies, autobiographies, memoirs, diaries, letters, journals, oral history interviews and/or as-told-to-narratives. 335/535

English 536

3 (crs.)

The Bible as Literature

The principal literary genres of the Old and New Testaments, emphasizing thematic content and historical background. The text studied is the King James Version. 336/536

English 540

3 (crs.)

Arthurian Legend and Romance

A study of the Arthurian legend from the earliest sources, the development of Arthurian Romance cycles, and the influence of the legend in other British literature.

English 541

3 (crs.)

History of the English Language

The history of modern English focusing on its vocabulary, dialects, kindred languages, grammar, and pronunciation. Includes an introduction to Old and Middle English. 341/541

English 542

3 (crs.)

Literature of the Romantic Era Green Romanticism-Optional Content

Examines the important role Romantic literature has played in the history of Western environmentalism and role that environmental science and environmentalism have played in the Romantic movements. Examines the relationships between people and how the landscape is imagined in poetry and prose, and how both literature and the land itself is structured by institutions of class, economics, gender, science, and law. This course may be offered with different content. Cross-listed: Environmental Studies 342/English 342 With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Prerequisite: English 281 or consent of instructor. 342/542

English 543

3 (crs.)

Nature Writing: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. A course in reading and writing about the natural world. Writers discussed may include Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, Annie Dillard, and others. Student writing will represent a significant portion of the coursework. Writing assignments may include essays on natural history, journal entries, environmental advocacy pieces, eco-fiction, and others consistent with the focus of the course. 343/543

English 544

3 (crs.)

Milton

Milton’s major and minor poems and selected prose writings in relation to the background of the literature and his times. 344/544

English 545

3 (crs.)

Twentieth-Century Women Writers – Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Studies in literature written by women in the Twentieth Century, with emphasis on works by contemporary authors.

English 546

3 (crs.)

Chaucer and His Age

A study of the major works in medieval English literature with emphasis on Chaucer. 346/546

English 547

3 (crs.)

Shakespeare I

Selected major plays in relation to dramatic conventions of the time and to modern productions. 347/547

English 550

3 – 4 (crs.)

Literary Study Tour: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. A course in British, American, or post-colonial literature which includes a conducted tour of sites in England, the U.S., or other regions pertinent to the focus the tour takes in any given year. Offered jointly by the English Department and the Division of Continuing Education. Itineraries, special course fees, and specific course requirements will be available whenever the course is offered. 350/550

English 551

3 (crs.)

Medieval Literature: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. A study of medieval literature including such subjects as Anglo-Saxon literature, Nordic literature, Icelandic Sagas, non-Chaucerian Middle English, Medieval drama, and Monastic literature. 351/551

English 553

3 (crs.)

Early Modern British Literature 1485-1660: Optional Content

This course may be offered with a different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. A study of the significant plays, poetry, and prose, which may include works of More, Spenser, Marlowe, Jonson, Bacon, Donne, and the Cavaliers and the Metaphysicals. Excludes Shakespeare. 353/553

English 554

3 – 6 (crs.)

Studies in Travel, Literature, and Culture: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. A study of travel narratives that investigates issues of representation, construction of self and others, and assumptions about culture, customs, and behavior. Fiction and nonfiction may be considered as well as films, photographs, advertisements, and maps. 354/554

English 556

3 (crs.)

Special Topics in Early British Drama: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, and the signature of the department chair, it may be taken twice. This study of English drama will focus on one of a variety of topics relevant to medieval, early-modern, and/or Restoration periods, such as the Early-modern Theater as Political Space, The Drama of Revenge, Early-Modern Drama as Colonialist Discourse, or Problematizing Gender in Medieval, Early-modern, and Restoration drama.

English 557

3 (crs.)

Literature and Other Arts: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content; with a different subtitle it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Different versions of the course will address a literary theme, period or genre in relation to a specific form of visual, aural or performing art. 357/557

English 558

3 (crs.)

Postcolonial Literature: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. This course presents a selection of prose, poetry, and drama that constructs the literary tradition of newly independent countries in the 20th century such as Africa, India, and Jamaica. Among topics to be covered are nationalism, identity, gender, and oral traditions. 358/558

English 561

3 (crs.)

Asian American Literature: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. This course will concentrate on different themes or different Asian American cultures or different periods of development in the body of literature. 361/561

English 562

3 (crs.)

British Literature of the Long Eighteenth Century: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Genres covered may include poetry, essays, satire, and/or drama of the long eighteenth century (1660-1837); topics covered may include imperialism, nationalism, gender, class, and/or racial issues, country life versus city life, Enlightenment, revolution, and literary professionalism. The course may or may not cover the entire period of the long eighteenth century. 362/562

English 563

3 (crs.)

Eighteenth-Century English Novel

A study of the novel before 1800: Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne and Smollett; the development of the historical romance, Gothic romance, and the novel of manners. 363/563

English 564

3 (crs.)

Nineteenth-Century British Novel: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. A study of the British novel from 1800 to 1900 which might include Austen, Scott, Bronte, Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot, Meredith, and Hardy.

English 565

3 (crs.)

Modern British Fiction: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. A study of 20th century British fiction. 365/565

English 566

3 (crs.)

Science Fiction

An examination of major 20th-century works in science fiction.

English 567

3 (crs.)

African Literature

A course on the culture and literature of African national communities. The focus will be on authors from various national communities whose writings have significantly shaped African literature. This course will include works by both men and women. 367/567

English 569

3 (crs.)

Literature of the Victorian Period: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. A study of the major figures, texts, and themes of the Victorian era. Prerequisite: English 281 or consent of instructor. 369/569

English 570

3 (crs.)

Native American Literature II: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Studies may include Native American literature of the 19th and 20th Centuries, oral tradition, poetry, and surrounding cultural materials. 370/570

English 571

3 (crs.)

African-American Women Writers: Optional Content (ES)

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. An examination of work by African-American women writers such as Toni Morrison, Gloria Naylor, Alice Walker, Paule Marshall, and others. 371/571

English 572

3 (crs.)

American Short Story: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. A study of major writers and their techniques from Poe to the present. 372/572

English 573

3 (crs.)

Colonial and Federalist Literature

American writing from the beginning through the early years of the republic. 373/573

English 574

3 (crs.)

American Romanticism

A study of writers such as Emerson, Fuller, Thoreau, Irving, Cooper, Melville, Hawthorne, Stowe, and/or others. 374/574

English 575

3 (crs.)

American Realism and Naturalism

Studies of American prose from the Civil War to World War I: Twain, Howells, Adams, James, Crane, and others. 375/575

English 576

3 (crs.)

Twentieth-Century Literature: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Studies of fiction, poetry, drama, and criticism from 1920 to the present. 376/576

English 577

3 (crs.)

Major Figures of American Literature: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. A study of one, two or three writers from any period in American Literature, Louise Erdrich, Edgar Allan Poe, Richard Wright, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Emily Dickinson, Toni Morrison and Adrienne Rich. 377/577

English 578

3 (crs.)

Modern American Novel: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. A study of the development of the American novel after 1920. 378/578

English 579

3 (crs.)

American Poetry: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. This course focuses on American poetry. It may be taught by highlighting a certain era in poetry such as modernism or by sampling a range of poets across the centuries. The featured writers in the course might include such figures as Phyllis Wheatley, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Langston Hughes, H. D., Adrienne Rich, or Joy Harjo among others. 379/579

English 580

3 (crs.)

Modern Drama: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. The content of this course, a study of modern and contemporary drama, will vary from semester to semester, and may include drama from around the world or from a particular culture. The course features an introduction to various forms of drama. 380/580

English 581

3 (crs.)

Foundations of Literary Criticism

An investigation of modern literary theories, critical approaches, and their application to selected literary texts. Prerequisite: English 281. 381/581

English 582

3 (crs.)

Contemporary Cultural Mythology: Optional Content

An introduction to types of cultural studies that emphasizes the range of interpretations of everyday texts and events. The course features criticism such as structuralism, semiotics, and feminism and application of theories to selected literary texts. 382/582

English 583

3 (crs.)

Introduction to English Linguistics

An introduction to sounds, word forms and sentence structures of English. Special emphasis on theories of grammar affecting today’s classroom. 383/583

English 584

3 (crs.)

Sociolinguistics

An introduction to theories and methodologies that describe variation in language. Special attention will be given to the social factors that affect language use, language policy, and attitudes toward language in education and everyday interactions. 384/584

English 585

3 (crs.)

Computers and Writing

In this course, students will explore the potential effects of computers on the writing process and on writing pedagogy. We will survey the research on the effects of computers on the social and cognitive aspects of writing, and we will study some theoretical works that attempt to predict the ways in which writing will continue to change in an increasingly computer-rich society. Students will analyze and critique hypertextual essays and stories, and will compose hypertexts of their own.

English 586

3 (crs.)

The Rhetoric of Literature

A rhetorical approach analyzes literature as a persuasive device. In this course, students will read a variety of literary works and discuss the personal and social viewpoints and biases that these works reveal; explore theoretical and psychological studies of the nature of narrative as a discursive act; and discuss the rhetorical power of literature as compared with other forms of discourse that are more commonly thought of as ‘rhetorical.’ 386/586

English 587

3 (crs.)

Special Topics in Rhetoric and Composition: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Students will study, in substantial depth, one topic in the field of rhetoric and composition. The topic will be chosen by the instructor. 387/587

English 590

3 (crs.)

Film and Literary Studies: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, and the signature of the department chair, it may be taken twice. The course will examine the relationship between film, literature and the culture in which and for which they are produced. Films that adapt novels, short stories, and/or plays will be examined, and films themselves will be examined as texts. A brief review of artistic terms (with regard to writers and film makers) will be provided. These will be the tools used to discuss how the artists affect us in terms of theme, plot, characterization, mood, and imagery. 390/590

English 591

3 (crs.)

Gay and Lesbian Literature: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. An examination of lesbian and gay literature, with emphasis on work by contemporary authors. Readings will be arranged thematically, with particular attention to identity politics and to the AIDS epidemic. Cross/listed with Women’s Studies 391. 391/591

English 592

3 (crs.)

Special Topics in Literature: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. The course focuses on topics that cross generic, temporal, and/or regional boundaries. Possible topics to be covered include gothicism; sex, sensibility and romanticism; subjectivity, identity, and agency; and the literature of aging. 392/592

English 593

3 (crs.)

Latina/o Literature: Optional Content

This course may be offered with a different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Course content will concentrate on the different themes, histories, cultures, or periods of development in the body of Latina/o literature.

English 594

3 (crs.)

Multiethnic Literatures: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Course content will highlight the similarities and differences between and among different themes, cultures, histories, or periods of development in a variety of ethnic literary traditions. The ethnic literatures introduced may include or stem from Asian, Pacific Islander, Latina/o, African, European, Jewish, and/or indigenous literary traditions.

English 595

3 (crs.)

Caribbean Literature: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. A study of Caribbean literature in English or English translation. Topics might include women’s writing, travel narratives, or colonial/post-colonial discourse.

English 596

3 (crs.)

Literature and History: Optional Content

An exploration of the relationship between history and literature. This course may investigate a period or year or series of historical moments in order to emphasize the dynamic relationships among historical events, attitudes, and literary representations, challenging artificial distinctions between literature and history and emphasizing how the categories of “history” and “literature” are cultural constructs. This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair.

English 605

3 (crs.)

Creative Writing: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Advanced study in creative writing, which may include workshops in experimental fiction or avant-garde forms, novel writing, publishing, and/or chapbook production. Prerequisite: A 300-level creative writing course or permission of instructor. 405/605

English 648

3 (crs.)

Shakespeare II: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. An intensive seminar in the advanced study of Shakespeare’s works; focus may be on one of a variety of topics and/or approaches to Shakespearean drama. Prerequisite: English 347. 448/648

English 652

3 (crs.)

Applied Linguistics

A survey of how research in linguistics can be used to solve human problems. While the focus will be on second language acquisition, language teaching, and testing, other possible topics include language planning and forensic linguistics. Prerequisite: English 301 or English 383. 452/652

English 682

3 (crs.)

Recent Literary Criticism: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle and the signature of the department chair, it may be taken twice. Students will analyze one or more major schools of interpretation. Theoretical works by major critical figures will be read and theories will be applied to selected texts. Prerequisite: English 381. 482/682

English 701

3 (crs.)

Seminar in Literature: Optional Content

A study of literature as a mode of human understanding, with various cultural and/or cross-cultural emphases. Optional content. With different subtitles and the signature of the department chair, it may be taken twice. Prerequisite: Admission to UW Oshkosh Master of Arts in English program or consent of the MA Director.

English 702

3 (crs.)

Language in Society: Optional Content

An advanced course in Sociolinguistics concentrating on phenomena such as global languages, language shift, and language death, or bilingualism, bi-dialectualism and identity. Optional content. With different subtitles and the signature of the department chair, it may be taken twice. Prerequisite: Admission to UW Oshkosh Master of Arts in English program or consent of the MA Director.

English 703

3 (crs.)

Seminar in Criticism: Optional Content

An examination of selected theories and their application in literary and cultural criticism. Optional content. With a different subtitle and the signature of the department chair, this course may be taken twice. Prerequisite: Admission to UW Oshkosh Master of Arts in English program or consent of the MA Director.

English 704

3 (crs.)

Methods of Research

Examination of the many print and electronic bibliographic research sources in English. May include readings on computing technologies, theories of textual transmission, history transmission, history of scholarship, and history of English studies. Prerequisite: Admission to UW Oshkosh Master of Arts in English program or consent of the MA Director.

English 708

3 (crs.)

American Poetry: Technique and Practice

Advanced study of the theories, movements and techniques in American Poetry from the 1920s to the present. Movements to be studied include Imagist, Objectivist, Free Verse, Formalist, Beat Generation, Black Mountain School, Concrete, and Action Poetry. Students will also create their own poems based on the form, style, and techniques of their choice. Prerequisite: Admission to UW Oshkosh Master of Arts in English program or consent of the MA Director.

English 709

3 (crs.)

Special Topics in Creative Writing: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. Advanced study in creative writing, which may include workshops in experimental fiction or avant-garde forms, novel writing, publishing, and/or chapbook production. Prerequisite: Admission to UW Oshkosh Master of Arts in English program or consent of the MA Director.

English 710

3 (crs.)

Seminar in Cultural Studies: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. This course will concentrate on different theoretical discourses or different periods of development of Cultural Studies as a formal field of study. Prerequisite: Admission to UW Oshkosh Master of Arts in English program or consent of the MA Director.

English 711

3 (crs.)

Seminar in American Ethnic Writers: Optional Content

This course may be offered with different content. With a different subtitle, it may be taken twice with the signature of the department chair. This course will concentrate on different themes of different Ethnic cultures or different periods of development in the body of literature, emphasizing comparative analysis. Prerequisite: Admission to UW Oshkosh Master of Arts in English program or consent of the MA Director.

English 712

3 (crs.)

Seminar in Women Writers: Optional Content

The content of the course will vary to examine women writers of different time periods, different ethnic backgrounds, or different themes. May be repeated twice with different content with consent of the Chair of the English Department. Students will be expected to have familiarity with various critical theories. Prerequisite: Admission to UW Oshkosh Master of Arts in English program or consent of the MA Director.

English 714

3 – 6 (crs.)

Studying Rhetoric and Writing: Optional Content

An intensive study of a single or limited number of theoretical approaches to rhetoric and composition. Includes practical application to fictional and/or nonfictional texts. May be taken twice (with different subtitles) with consent of the Chair of the English Department. Prerequisite: Admission to UW Oshkosh Master of Arts in English program or consent of the MA Director.

English 795

1 – 6 (crs.)

English Thesis

In this course, students work under faculty supervision to produce a creative or critical thesis. Maximum accumulation of six credits.

English 796

1 – 3 (crs.)

Independent Study

This course gives students the opportunity to pursue, under the direction of a graduate faculty member, a topic in English studies for which no formal course is available. Maximum accumulation of six credits.