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Professional Counseling

PROGRAM CONTACT INFORMATION

Renae Swanson, Program Coordinator and Chair
Kathleen Stewardson, Clinical Coordinator
Office: Nursing/ Education 1
Telephone: (920) 424-1475

Website: https://uwosh.edu/coehs/departments/counseling/
E-mail: professionalcounseling@uwosh.edu

FACULTY

Harper, Lindsey, A. Saginak, K. Saginak, Scofield, Stewardson, Swanson

PURPOSE

The graduate program in Counseling is designed to prepare counseling professionals for schools (PK-12), higher education settings and clinical mental health counseling agencies.

DEGREES/CERTIFICATES

Completion of the program will lead to the degree: Master of Science in Education (M.S.E.)

ADDITIONAL ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS INFORMATION

Admission to the Professional Counseling program is a two-part process.

A. Admission to Graduate Studies

In addition to the requirements of the Office of Graduate Studies specified in the POLICIES section of this Bulletin, the program has established the following policies and procedures for admission:

B. Admission to the Professional Counseling Program

1. Applicants submit the following items to the Office of Graduate Studies:

  • Office of Graduate Studies e-Application for Admission (apply.wisconsin.edu/)
  • Application for Admission Fee ($56)
  • All undergraduate transcript(s)
  • Two (2) letters of reference
  • Professional Counseling Department Application Supplement – uwosh.edu/gradstudies/admissions/additional-application-instructions/professional-counseling-supplement
  • COEHS Disclosure Statement –
    uwosh.edu/gradstudies/admissions/additional-application-instructions/professional-counseling-disclosure
  • COEHS TK20 Application
    https://uwosh.tk20.com/campustoolshighered/start.do
  • Resume – A current, typewritten resume outlining previous work experience, volunteer service and educational activity that support the applicant’s desire to enter the counseling profession.
  • A Miller Analogies Test (MAT) score report

2. The Professional Counseling Admissions Committee reviews applicant files and invites those applicants selected to campus for on-campus interviews.

3. Applicants who are selected to proceed in the admissions process are notified of the dates and times for required on-campus interviews. Those who are not selected are notified in writing by the Office of Graduate Studies that they have not been admitted to the program.

4. Within two weeks of the on-campus interviews, the department notifies applicants in writing whether they have been granted or denied admission.

5. When admitted, students have one calendar year from the date of acceptance to begin their coursework. Students who do not begin coursework within one year must reapply.

Admission Standards

1. Grade-Point Average
The department seeks applicants with a minimum, undergraduate grade-point average of 3.00 overall, or 3.25 in the last one-half of their undergraduate program. If an applicant’s grade-point average is below 3.00, then the department may require additional supporting documentation. Such documentation can include:

Graduate Record Exam scores
Summary of educational achievements and goals not reflected in grade-point-average.
Two additional letters of reference from individuals who attest to the applicant’s ability to successfully complete graduate work.
Official documentation of grades of B or higher in counseling-related graduate courses.

2. Application Supplement
The department seeks applicants whose supplements:

Clearly articulate professional goals that are compatible with the degree being sought.
Demonstrate an ability to meaningfully reflect on—and grow from—life experiences.
Convey a commitment to graduate study.
Reveal writing skills commensurate with graduate study.

3. References
The department seeks applicants with at least 2 letters of reference from individuals who have direct knowledge of the applicant’s qualifications. Letters should address:

Professional experience, skills and attitudes.
Academic ability and potential for graduate study.
Interpersonal skills that may indicate success in counselor-training program.
Professional Counselor dispositions.

4. Resume
The department seeks applicants with two years (or equivalent) experience in human services and/or related fields. This experience may be in the form of professional employment, volunteer service or internship experiences.

5. The Miller Analogies Test (MAT)

6. On-Campus Interviews
The department seeks applicants who demonstrate the following during the on-campus interviews:

Understanding of the counseling profession.
Awareness of the demands of graduate study.
Professional demeanor.
Compatibility with professional counseling values and ethics, including support for a diversity of lifestyles and belief systems.
Indicators of flexibility in the above.

Application Deadlines

The deadline for applications and ALL supporting admission documentation is January 15. A complete application is one that provides the materials submitted by the applicant and includes all required materials provided by other sources. Applications received or completed after the deadline will be considered for the next application cycle.

An application is considered complete when ALL of the following materials are received in the Office of Graduate Studies by January 15:

  • Office of Graduate Studies electronic application for admission
  • Application for admission fee ($56)
  • All undergraduate transcript(s)
  • Two (2) letters of reference
  • Professional Counseling Department Application Supplement
  • COEHS Disclosure Statement
  • Resume
  • The Miller Analogies Test (MAT)

SUMMARY

A. Structure

The department offers three emphases.

Clinical Mental Health Counseling
School Counseling
Student Affairs and College Counselor
Within each emphasis area, students complete core, emphasis-specific and elective courses.

B. Academic Plans of Study

Professional Counseling – <Emphasis title> is the description for the Professional Counseling plans of study.

Clinical Mental Health Counseling
School Counseling
Student Affairs and College Counseling

C. Minimum Unit (Cr.) Requirements
All emphases/plans of study require 48 graduate credits except Clinical Mental Health Counseling which requires 60 graduate credits.

D. Admission to Candidacy
Students must satisfy fully the Office of Graduate Studies requirements for advancement to candidacy as stated in the POLICIES section of this Bulletin. Students must confer with their program coordinator/advisor to plan and receive program approval for their admission to candidacy. The Office of Graduate Studies gives final approval to Admission to Candidacy.

In addition, students must complete a minimum of 15 credits and no more than 24 credits before applying for candidacy. Completed credits must include the following courses:

701, Theoretical Foundations in Counseling (with a grade of 3.0 (B) or higher)
702, Counseling Process (with a grade of 3.0 (B) or higher)
731, Group Counseling Process (with a grade of B 3.0 or higher)
Transfer credits cannot be used to fulfill the 15 credits needed to apply for candidacy. Students must be admitted to candidacy in order to progress beyond 24 credits in the department and prior to enrolling in 794 – Counseling Practicum. The department grants or denies candidacy through a full-faculty vote after close review of students’ progress. Additional criteria are outlined in the department’s student handbook.

E. Graduation Requirements
Candidates must satisfy all program and Office of Graduate Studies academic, culminating, and degree requirements to be eligible for graduation and degree conferral.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

CORE COURSES:

Professional Counseling
700 3 Professional Identity and Ethics
702 3 Counseling Process
704 3 Assessment Techniques in Counseling
708 3 Career Development
711 3 Life Span Development in Counseling
731 3 Group Counseling Process
732 3 Applied Research and Evaluation in Counseling
776 3 Addictions in Counseling
788 3 Social and Cultural Foundations of Counseling
794 5 Counseling Practicum
797 3 Counseling Internship I
798 3 Counseling Internship II
799 0 Registration for Comprehensive Exam
Successful completion of the Professional Counseling Department Comprehensive Exam (effective Summer 2014).

EMPHASES

In addition to the core courses:

A. Clinical Mental Health Counseling
Professional Counseling
701 3 Theoretical Foundations of Counseling
725 3 Trauma and Crisis in Counseling
726 3 Wellness, Spirituality, and Mindfulness in Counseling
727 3 Psychopathology and Psychopharmacology in Counseling
729 3 Foundations of Clinical Mental Health Counseling
730 3 Contextual Diagnosis
735 3 Counseling Children and Adolescents
784 3 Relational Systems in Counseling
B. School Counseling
Professional Counseling
733 3 Comprehensive School Counseling
735 3 Counseling Children and Adolescents
And: three (3) credit hours of department-approved elective coursework.
C. Student Affairs and College Counselor
Professional Counseling
724 3 Special Topics: Foundations of School Counseling
709 3 Student Affairs and College Counseling
745 3 Student Development and the College Environment
And: six (6) credit hours of department-approved elective coursework.
Electives:

Students must consult with their adviser to select recommended electives.

Other Requirements:

Culminating Experience
The culminating experience is the Counseling Internship II course (Professional Counseling 798) AND successful completion of the Comprehensive Examination. Students should contact their adviser or the coordinator of the school counseling emphasis for details.

LICENSURE AS A PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR IN WISCONSIN

Students enrolled in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling emphasis, who are interested in eventually attaining the Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) credential through the Department of Safety and Professional Services in Wisconsin may refer to the following website for current information: dsps.wi.gov.

Please note that students in the School and Student Affairs and College Counseling emphases who wish to become licensed must also complete the curricular requirements for Clinical Mental Health Counseling in order for the Department of Professional Counseling to verify completion for such licensure.

LICENSURE AS A SCHOOL COUNSELOR IN WISCONSIN

Students enrolled in or considering the school counseling emphasis should refer to the following Web Sites for current licensure information:

https://dpi.wi.gov/sspw/pupil-services/school-counseling/licensing/process
uwosh.edu/coehs/departments/counseling/current/

COURSE OFFERINGS

Professional Counseling 700

3 (crs.)

Professional Identity and Ethics

This course provides students with an overview of issues in the ethical practice of professional counseling in Clinical Mental Health agencies schools, and higher education settings. Topics addressed will include ethical decision-making; professional credentials and affiliations; and standards of practice, research, and training in counseling. Open to Professional Counseling Majors only.

Professional Counseling 701

3 (crs.)

Theoretical Foundations of Counseling

This course introduces students to the theory, knowledge and skills that provide the foundation for the counseling process. Students will be involved in a variety of individual and group structured counseling process experiences to assist in the integration of the cognitive with the affective domains of counseling.

Professional Counseling 702

3 (crs.)

Counseling Process

An introduction to the process and techniques involved in developing an effective counseling relationship. The course is designed to aid students in gaining personal insight into the roles in the counseling process. Course includes a 90-minute Small Group Experience lab. Open to Professional Counseling majors only.

Professional Counseling 704

3 (crs.)

Assessment Techniques in Counseling

Foundations of standardized group testing and non-test assessment techniques. The selection and interpretation of such tools within the counseling process.

Professional Counseling 708

3 (crs.)

Career Development

This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of career development over the lifespan as it relates to the world of work, education, avocation, and the interrelationships of family and other life roles. Foundational and contextual dimensions are explored including career path factors, influences of work ethics, and the changing workforce; career choice, decision-making, and implementation; job satisfaction/stress and lifestyle management; career development theories; career counseling services, assessment, and occupational information resources including online applications; job search strategies, and future trends and issues. This course enables students to expand their career counseling knowledge and skills from a lifespan perspective. Prerequisite: Professional Counseling 701 or (may be taken concurrently)

Professional Counseling 709

3 (crs.)

Student Affairs and College Counseling

This course is designed to introduce students to current trends and issues in higher education with an emphasis on the field of Student Affairs and College Counseling, including its history, development, and philosophies. A thorough overview of the profession is presented to provide students with knowledge and skills typically required for pursuing a career in a wide range of student services settings. Discussion and activities are directed toward examining the challenges with which higher education is faced today, and the processes encountered in meeting them.

Professional Counseling 711

3 (crs.)

Life Span Development in Counseling

This course provides students with an overview of human growth and development based on a life-span approach from infancy through the aged, with an emphasis on the developmental theories as a basis for understanding counseling theories. It presents strategies for working with clients from a developmental perspective and provides opportunities for students to examine their own developmental processes. The course includes a focus on addressing developmental issues in schools, clinical mental health agencies, and higher education settings with an emphasis on ethical considerations.

Professional Counseling 724

1 – 3 (crs.)

Current Issues in Counseling

A course in topics of current interest. May be repeated, under different topics, for credit. Only 6 credits may be applied to the MSE Degree in Professional Counseling.

Professional Counseling 725

3 (crs.)

Trauma and Crisis in Counseling

The purpose of the course is to educate and prepare you, if that statement can be made contextually, to deal with the inevitable crisis situations you will likely encounter as a professional counselor. This course seeks to develop your understanding, deeper appreciation and abiding response to those who are in crisis, involved in natural disasters (both present and past), traumatic experiences, violence in all its various forms and the eventual loss associated with such experiences. This course affords the student an opportunity to study the theories, response models and techniques associated with trauma, crisis, disaster and loss, both independently and through cooperative group activity. The student can expect the course to be emotionally challenging. You will have to think about painful experiences, face some difficult issues, examine your own strengths and vulnerabilities, and conceptualize new ways of helping others beyond basic attending skills. A strong theoretical base must support the application of professional counseling skills. Professional counselors must understand both what their actions will likely produce and how that outcome will be achieved. To achieve this end, the course will consist of multiple methods of content presentation (i.e., written and reading assignment, mini lecture burst, videotape, guest speakers, experiential exercises, role-play, dyadic and small group work, large group class discussion. Prerequisites: Open to professional counseling majors only. Any exceptions require department faculty approval.

Professional Counseling 726

3 (crs.)

Wellness, Spirituality, and Mindfulness in Counseling

This course is designed to provide students with direct study and application of wellness, spiritual, and mindfulness theories and techniques to assist in the counseling process. The course exposes students to the promotion of emotional wellness and provides an understanding of connections between body, mind, and spirit. The course is oriented toward providing a developmental and preventive approach in working with a diverse population, in addition to developing skills and methods for promoting physical and mental health and well-being in self and others. Prerequisites: Open to professional counseling majors only. Any exceptions require department faculty approval.

Professional Counseling 727

3 (crs.)

Neuroscience

The course focuses on the contemporary advances of neuroscience as they relate to neuroplasticity, mental wellness, and positive psychological growth. The course centers on informed professional counseling practice, bridging neuroscience and its unquestionable role within a holistic mental wellness service provision paradigm. In addition, the course provides a general and foundational overview of basic physiologic processes related to pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics regarding various psychotropic medications, their effectiveness as well as side effects.

Professional Counseling 728

3 (crs.)

Grief Counseling

This course provides students with knowledge of the grieving process with regard to non-death as well as death-related losses. It presents strategies for working with clients experiencing ‘uncomplicated’ and ‘complicated’ grief and provides opportunities for students to examine their own loss histories. The course includes program development methods for addressing grief in schools, CMH agencies, and higher education settings.

Professional Counseling 729

3 (crs.)

Foundations of Clinical Mental Health Counseling

This course focuses on professional issues and concerns specific to the area of clinical mental health counseling. Course content includes the history, philosophy and trends in clinical mental health counseling; models and theories related to clinical mental health counseling; the roles and functions of clinical mental health counselors in various practice settings; collaboration with other professionals; professional organizations, preparation standards, and credentials relevant to the practice of clinical mental health counseling. The course will also cover prevention and intervention programming, service delivery selection, community resource identification and referral, and crisis and emergency management intervention. Consultation and advocacy strategies, outreach and program development and management, mental health and wellness promotion, and ethical and legal guidelines and considerations will be addressed, as will the relationship between social and cultural variables and clinical mental health counseling. Prerequisite: Open to Professional Counseling majors only. Any exceptions require department faculty approval.

Professional Counseling 730

3 (crs.)

Contextual Diagnostics

This course is designed to address etiology, dimensional assessment, diagnostic processes and nomenclature, prevention, treatment, and interventions with persons experiencing or exhibiting mental, behavioral, developmental, or emotional concerns. The course will also address comorbidity, procedures for assessing and managing suicide risk, consultation and supervision, and societal and environmental issues, which impact mental health and wellness. These topics will be addressed through a lens of culturally responsive service selection and delivery and contextual and ecological considerations. Applications and limitations of established diagnostic systems will be considered. Students will build their skills in utilizing diagnosis and treatment planning, case conceptualization, best practices, and a variety of theoretical approaches and treatment paradigms. Prerequisite: Open to Professional Counseling majors only. Any exceptions require Department Faculty approval.

Professional Counseling 731

3 (crs.)

Group Counseling Process

An examination of traditional and new counseling and guidance groups with particular emphasis on effective counselor skills and techniques for group work. Prerequisite: Professional Counseling 702. Open to Professional Counseling majors only.

Professional Counseling 732

3 (crs.)

Applied Research and Evaluation in Counseling

This course is focused on professional counseling students developing skills and competencies in utilizing and conducting research practices in school, student affairs, and clinical mental health settings. Students will learn how to generate and integrate current research within evidence-based, data-driven counseling practice. Students will learn how to use action-based research in generating measurable outcomes, and will learn to use common qualitative and quantitative research designs and statistical methods to create meaningful and interpretable results to inform professional counseling practice. Students will also learn and apply current models of outcome research and program evaluation. Additionally, students will critically analyze counseling research and determine the use of current research as a foundation of evidenced-based practice. Students will develop relevant research questions, assess applicable literature, design appropriate research paradigms, complete a research proposal, and execute action-based research. Students will also be responsible for disseminating their research finding via poster presentations or other professional presentation forums. Prerequisites: Open to professional counseling majors. Any exceptions require department faculty approval.

Professional Counseling 733

3 (crs.)

Comprehensive School Counseling

This course prepares school counselors for their role in providing a sequential, standards-based, comprehensive PreK-12 school counseling program across the academic, personal/social, and career development domains. Emphasis is on the (a) foundations and contextual dimensions of school counseling; (b) assessment, counseling, prevention, and intervention; (c) program evaluation and action research; (d) academic development (e) collaboration and consultation; and (f) leadership. As a core foundation of this course, students will connect with children and adolescents off-campus in real-life systems, as a mechanism for learning effective classroom management and delivering an evidence-based guidance curriculum. Significant time is also devoted to exploring and discussing professional issues related to school counseling in the 21st century. Prerequisite: Open to Professional Counseling majors only. Any exceptions require department faculty approval.

Professional Counseling 735

3 (crs.)

Counseling Children and Adolescents

This course provides students with a conceptual and applied knowledge and understanding of child and adolescent development, relative to the counseling process. Likewise, in terms of broad and specific counseling modalities, students will learn assessment and counseling approaches designed to meet the diverse and unique needs of children and adolescents across a variety of cultures, contexts, and systems. As a core foundation of this course, students will connect with children and adolescents off-campus in real-life systems as a mechanism for applying and synthesizing the course content and advancing counselor development. Significant time will be devoted to exploring and discussing professional issues related to counseling children and adolescents in the 21st century. Prerequisite: Open to Professional Counseling majors only. Any exceptions require department faculty approval.

Professional Counseling 745

3 (crs.)

Student Development and the College Environment

This course is designed to familiarize students with major theories of student development and apply key theoretical concepts that address students’ cognitive, intellectual, identity/personality, ethical, moral, career and social development during the college years. Issues that reflect the diversity, complexity and change in higher education today are also examined. Emphasis is placed on examining student needs, satisfaction and cultures; the impact of campus environments on student development and analysis of programs/services assessment outcomes. Students are provided with the opportunity to design and implement needs and outcomes assessments that reflect specific theoretical perspectives.

Professional Counseling 776

3 (crs.)

Addictions in Counseling

This course provides counselors across settings and other human service workers with an overview of addiction, the process of addiction, and treatment/recovery approaches. The course will also emphasize relapse prevention, developmental issues, spirituality, and ecological aspects of life. Students will learn an ecological approach, motivational interviewing (MI) and stages of change (SOC) as options for treatment and prevention planning. Open to Professional Counseling majors only.

Professional Counseling 784

3 (crs.)

Relational Systems in Counseling

An introduction to major concepts, theories and current practices in the area of marriage and family counseling. The course integrates the counseling process and present theoretical techniques for working with families. Prerequisites: Open to Professional Counseling majors only. Any exceptions require department faculty approval.

Professional Counseling 788

3 (crs.)

Social and Cultural Foundations of Counseling

An investigation of the concepts of social change counseling as they relate to working with persons from special populations. Consideration of unique concerns and counseling strategies relating to persons from special populations, such as ethnic and racial minorities, women, persons with disabilities, aging, etc. Prerequisite: Open to Professional Counseling majors only.

Professional Counseling 794

3 (crs.)

Counseling Practicum

This course provides students with supervised counseling practice, experience in consultation, and related activities in a structured field setting and in the on-campus Counseling Laboratory. The Counseling Laboratory experience is supervised using a modified Milan model. Emphasis is placed on students effectively integrating counseling theory with appropriate therapeutic skills and techniques, and their philosophical perspectives relative to counseling and wellness. The course will further the students’ rigorous exploration of themselves, their theory of change, and the profession of counseling. This course meets the Practicum requirement according to CACREP standards and includes a 2-hour lab component. Prerequisite: Admission to Candidacy. Open to Professional Counseling majors only.

Professional Counseling 796

1 – 3 (crs.)

Independent Study

Each registration with maximum accumulation of 6 cr. Registration for advanced students who want to pursue a topic under the direction of professional counseling faculty. Prerequisite: Independent Study Topic and Instructor Approval Form must be filed at or before registration.

Professional Counseling 797

3 (crs.)

Counseling Internship I

This course focuses on providing site-based counseling and related services in settings that are consistent with an emphasis in school, student affairs in higher education or Clinical Mental Health counseling. Student interns will demonstrate an integration of theoretical concepts and effective counseling and psycho-educational skills. The campus-based component of the course is experiential in nature; the required site-based component of the course will be a supervised placement with a minimum of 300 hours to include 120 hours of direct client services. Prerequisite: Clinical Mental Health counseling emphasis: Professional Counseling 794. School counseling emphasis: Professional Counseling 794 and 733 (794 and 733 may be taken concurrently. Student affairs and college counseling emphasis: Professional Counseling 794 and 745 may be taken concurrently.) Open to Professional Counseling majors only. Repeatable for credit for up to 9 credits.

Professional Counseling 798

3 (crs.)

Counseling Internship II

A continuation of Professional Counseling 797 Counseling Internship I; this is an experiential course with a focus on site-based counseling and related services. Student counselors will demonstrate an integration of theoretical concepts and effective counseling and psycho educational skills. A supervised placement with a minimum of 300 clock hours including 120 hours of direct client services is required. Prerequisite: Clinical Mental Health Counseling Emphasis: Professional Counseling 797. School Counseling Emphasis: Professional Counseling 797. Student Affairs and College Counseling Emphasis: Professional Counseling 797. Open to Professional Counseling majors only. Repeatable for credit for up to 9 credits.

Professional Counseling 799

0 (crs.)

Registration for Comprehensive Examination

Pass/fail course.