Select Page

Chemistry

 

Information

 

Brant Kedrowski, Jennifer Mihalick, Co-Chairpersons

Department Office: Halsey Science 432
Department Telephone: (920) 424-1400

Code 32 or CHEM

 

Faculty

Paulson

Crawford

Schuttlefield-Christus

Gutow

Tang

Kedrowski

Wacholtz

Lense

Waters

Mihalick

Xie

 

Degrees

  • Undergraduate: A major in Chemistry can lead to the degree: Bachelor of Science; Bachelor of Science in Education.
  • Graduate: The Department does not offer a graduate program.
 

Summary of Fields of Study

  1. Goal(s)
  • Upon completion of a Chemistry major, students will be 1) knowledgeable about the factual and theoretical basis of chemistry, 2) competent to work in a laboratory situation, 3) familiar with the use and applications of modern instrumentation and computers, 4) able to communicate effectively, 5) access and retrieve specific chemical information from the chemical literature, 6) able to anticipate, recognize and respond properly to hazards of chemicals, 7) work cooperatively with others in problem solving situations and 8) identify the benefits and problems of modern chemistry for society.
  • The Major(s)
    • The Department offers a choice of three emphases within the Chemistry Major. These are: 1) Professional, 2) Secondary Education, 3) Biomolecular Science.
    • Within the Professional emphasis there is a Biochemistry option.
  • The Minor(s)
    • The Department offers one minor: 1) Chemistry.
 

Admission/Graduation Requirements

  • To be eligible for graduation, students must meet all requirements for the degree being sought, in addition to earning a minimum grade point average of 2.00 in all courses required for the Chemistry major or minor.
  • Those students seeking Wisconsin teacher certification must earn a minimum grade point average of 3.00 in all courses required for their majors and minors in order to meet requirements of the College of Education and Human Services.
 

Required Core Courses

 

Chemistry

  • Chemistry 105 General Chemistry I 5 cr.
  • Chemistry 106 General Chemistry II 5 cr.
  • Chemistry 234 Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 cr.
  • Chemistry 235 Organic Chemistry I 3 cr.
  • Chemistry 311 Analytical Chemistry I  4 cr.
  • Chemistry 334 Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 cr.
  • Chemistry 335 Organic Chemistry II 3 cr.
  • Chemistry 490 Chemistry Seminar I 1 cr.
  • Chemistry 491 Chemistry Seminar II 1 cr.
Note: All senior Chemistry majors are to enroll in Chemistry 490 one semester before the semester in which they will graduate. Chemistry 491 is to be taken the last semester.  Chemistry 474 (Honors Thesis) can be used to replace Chemistry 490 and
Chemistry 491 providing that a) the topic of the Honors Thesis is in the field of Chemistry, b) the student attends the Chemistry Seminar classes for two semesters and c) the student presents his/her oral Thesis Seminar to the Chemistry Seminar program.

 

Math

  • Mathematics 171 Calculus I or Mathematics 175 Honors: Calculus 4 cr.

 

Physics

  • Physics 191 and 192.

Comment:
The 22 credits of Math and Physics courses in the core are not counted as part of the required minimum credits for any of the emphases/options.

 

The Major(s), with Emphases and/or Options

 

1. Chemistry Major

A. Professional Emphasis

The Professional Emphasis leads to a BS degree in Chemistry, which meets the requirements of the American Chemical Society for professional training.

  • Required Credits: 44 minimum
  • Required Courses: In addition to the Core Courses:
    • Chemistry: Chemistry 303, 312, 370, 371, 470
    • Math: Math 172, 273
    • Chemistry Electives: 3 credits from Chemistry 323, 360, 435, 446*, 452, 474, 495*. Chemistry 446, 474 and 495 may in combination count for up to three credits towards the three-credit requirement.
    • *A formal report is required.

     Biochemistry Option:

  • Required Credits: 46 minimum
  • Required Courses: In addition to the requirements for the Professional Emphasis:
    • Chemistry Elective: Chemistry 304, 315
    • Biology: Three semester hours of biology beyond the introductory level, which contains cell biology, microbiology, or genetics.

Comment:
Students are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the opportunity to enroll in the following individualized research/internship courses: Chemistry 246, 446, 474, 495. Independent Study (Chemistry 446), Honors Thesis (Chemistry 474), and/or Chemistry Research Internship (Chemistry 495) may be counted towards graduation requirements, with a credit maximum of 12 for Chemistry 446, six for Chemistry 246, six for Chemistry 474 and six for Chemistry 495.

 

B. Secondary Education Emphasis

Recommended for students who plan to enter the Secondary Education Program in preparation for teaching high school Chemistry.

  • Required Credits: 36 minimum
  • Required Courses: In addition to the Core Courses:
  • Chemistry: Chemistry 370, 371
  • Math: Math 172, 273
  • Electives: Sufficient to meet the Minimum Requirement including these studies:
    • Chemistry: Five credits of Chemistry courses at the 300 level or above (excluding Chemistry 495).

   

C. Biomolecular Science Emphasis

Recommended for students who are interested in interdisciplinary training and a career or postgraduate work in biotechnology related fields.

  • Required Credits: 70-73
  • Required Courses: In addition to the Core Courses:
    • Biology: Biology 105, 323, 343
    • One Advanced Molecular/Cellular Biology Course with Lecture and Lab: Biology 309, 319, 345, 450
      OR  One Advanced Molecular/Cellular Biology Lecture Course: Biology 315, 316, 341, 372, 389
      AND
    • One Advanced Molecular/Cellular Biology Laboratory Course: Biology 350, 374, 377, 390
    • Chemistry: Chemistry 303, 304, 315, 311 or 320, 365
    • Physics: Physics 171 and 172, or Physics 191 and 192
    • Math: One course from: Math 172, 201, 301, Psychology 203, or Economics 210.
  • Upper Level Electives: 3 credits to choose from any of the following not taken as part of the core curriculum above:
    • Biology: Biology 211, 212, 300, 301, 306, 309, 315, 316, 319, 338, 341, 345, 350, 372, 374, 375, 377, 389, 390, 446, 450, 456, 474.
    • Chemistry: Chemistry 323, 360, 446, 456, 474, 495.
    • Psychology: Psychology 367, 383.
 

The Minor(s)

 

Chemistry Minor

  • Required Credits: 22 minimum
  • Required Courses:
    • Chemistry: Chemistry 105, 106, 234, 235, 311, 334, 335
    • For those students graduating with a Medical Technology major, Chemistry 303, 304 and 320 may be substituted for Chemistry 311.
  • Electives: None

 

Course Offerings

Chemistry    101

4 – 5 (crs.)

General, Organic and Biochemistry I (XL)

This is the first semester of the 1-year chemistry 101/102 course sequence, which is specifically designed to meet the needs of nursing students.  This sequence does not satisfy the prerequisites for higher-level chemistry courses.  Topics covered include: matter, energy, atomic structure, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, solutions, chemical equilibrium, and organic nomenclature.  Prerequisites:  A declared pre-nursing major, Radiologic Science, Biology Healthcare-Business, Kinesiology, or Elem Ed major, and Mathematics 103 with a grade of C or better, or qualifying for Mathematics 104 and higher via the Mathematics Placement Exam, or AAS-FOX, AAS-FDL.  (3+2) (Fall-Spring) Special fees may apply.

 

 

Chemistry    102

1 – 4 (crs.)

General, Organic and Biochemistry II (XL)

This is the second semester of the 1-year Chemistry 101/102 course sequence.  Topics covered include:  the organic chemistry topics of alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amines, and the biochemistry topics of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes, and metabolism. Prerequisites: Chemistry 101 or Chemistry 105 with a grade of C or better. (3+2) (Fall-Spring) Special fees may apply.

 

 

Chemistry    103

4 (crs.)

Introduction to Environmental Chemistry (XL)

This laboratory course will cover the chemistry of environmental topics such as: air pollution, ozone depletion, water pollution, acid rain, waste disposal and energy production. Occasionally tangentially related topics such as drug design and nutrition may be discussed.  This course may be combined with Chemistry 104, to form a two semester sequence for the Bachelor of Science degree.  NOTE: Chemistry 103 is not a prerequisite for higher level chemistry courses. Special fees may apply.

 

 

Chemistry    103Q2

4 (crs.)

Introduction to Environmental Chemistry (XL)

This laboratory course will cover the chemistry of environmental topics such as: air pollution, ozone depletion, water pollution, acid rain, waste disposal and energy production. Occasionally tangentially related topics such as drug design and nutrition may be discussed.  This course may be combined with Chemistry 104, to form a two semester sequence for the Bachelor of Science degree.  NOTE: Chemistry 103 is not a prerequisite for higher level chemistry courses. Special fees may apply.

 

 

Chemistry    104

4 (crs.)

Introduction to the Chemistry of Materials (XL)

This laboratory course will teach the chemistry behind materials that society depends on: metals, ceramics, and polymers.  Historic and economic impacts of their manufacture and use will be considered.  Applications of advanced materials in fields such as electronics, aviation or art will be discussed.  This course may be combined with Chemistry 103 to form a two-semester sequence for the Bachelor of Science degree.  Note:  Chemistry 104 is not a prerequisite for higher level chemistry courses.

 

 

Chemistry    104Q2

4 (crs.)

Introduction to the Chemistry of Materials (XL)

This laboratory course will teach the chemistry behind materials that society depends on: metals, ceramics, and polymers.  Historic and economic impacts of their manufacture and use will be considered.  Applications of advanced materials in fields such as electronics, aviation or art will be discussed.  This course may be combined with Chemistry 103 to form a two-semester sequence for the Bachelor of Science degree.  Note:  Chemistry 104 is not a prerequisite for higher level chemistry courses.

 

 

Chemistry    105

5 (crs.)

General Chemistry I (XL)

This is the first semester of the 1-year Chemistry 105/106 course sequence, which is specifically designed to meet the needs of science majors and preprofessional students. Topics covered include: atomic theory, atomic and electronic structure, chemical bonding, mole concept, stoichiometry, state of matter, formulas and equations, solutions and colloids. Prerequisites: Credit for or concurrent enrollment in Math 104, or completion/placement of any higher math course. Recommended: A previous course in High School or College Chemistry. (4+2) (Fall-Spring) Special fees may apply.

 

 

Chemistry    106

1 – 5 (crs.)

General Chemistry II (XL)

This is the second semester of the 1-year Chemistry 105/106 course sequence, which is specifically designed to meet the needs of science majors and preprofessional students.  Topics covered in Chemistry 106 include: molecular structure, chemistry of metals and selected nonmetals, intermolecular forces, chemical equilibrium.  Prerequisites: Chemistry 105 with a grade of (C) or better and either completion of Math 104 with a grade of C or better, completion/placement of any higher math course. (4+3) (Fall-Spring) Special fees may apply.

 

 

Chemistry    112

2 (crs.)

Foundations of Chemistry

Designed to prepare students with limited science backgrounds for success in Chemistry 101, 105, 106, or 165. Through lectures and discussions, this course emphasizes fundamental chemical concepts, chemical nomenclature and problem-solving skills. Credits earned in Chemistry 112 do not apply toward graduation.

 

 

Chemistry    122

3 (crs.)

Survey of Biochemistry

This is the second semester of the General Organic Biochemistry sequence, without the laboratory component. Topics covered include the organixc chemistry topics of alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amines, and the biochemistry topics of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes, and metabolism. A student may not earn more than four credits by taking CHEM 122 and CHEM 102. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in CHEM 101 or CHEM 105.

 

 

Chemistry    123

3 (crs.)

Chemistry and Society

A course for non-science majors that covers basic chemistry concepts in a social context. May include explorations of how chemistry impacts the environment, public health, energy policies, and other contemporary social issues. Consists of lectures and may also include discussions and demonstrations. Not a suitable prerequisite for higher-level chemistry courses or pre-professional programs.

 

 

Chemistry    124

4 (crs.)

Chemistry and Society (XL)

A course for non-science majors that covers basic chemistry concepts in a social context. May include explorations of how chemistry impacts the environment, public health, energy policies, and other contemporary social issues. Consists of lectures and laboratories and may also include discussion and demonstrations. Not a suitable prerequisite for higher-level Chemistry courses or pre-professional programs.

 

 

Chemistry    165

5 (crs.)

Chemistry for Engineers (XL)

A one-semester chemistry course for engineering students. Topics include measurements, atomic theory, stoichiometry, molecular structure, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, solid state, material science, and organic chemistry. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in Chem 112 or Chem 101 or grade of B or higher in high school chemistry and a grade of C or better in Math 104 or 108 or placement into Math 171 based on placement test score, or permission from the instructor. Not suitable substitute for the Chem 105/106 prerequisite for organic chemistry.

 

 

Chemistry    230

1 (crs.)

Scientific Glassblowing

Fundamental principles of scientific glassblowing. Practice in the basic techniques and the development of skill in the art of glassblowing. Introduction to the use of the glass lathe and the design of complex equipment. Prerequisite:  One chemistry lab course. Special fees may apply.

 

 

Chemistry    234

1 (crs.)

Organic Chemistry Lab I

Laboratory experience to complement Organic Chemistry I. Techniques explored include methods for separation, purification, and identification of organic compounds, and syntheses. Co-requisites: Chemistry 235. Special course fees may apply.

 

 

Chemistry    235

3 (crs.)

Organic Chemistry I

Major topics include nomenclature, reactions and mechanisms of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and their halogen derivatives; aromaticity; qualitative molecular orbital approach to bonding and structure; and stereochemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 106 with a grade of C or better. Co-requisite Chemistry 234 (3+3) (Fall-Spring) Special fees may apply.

 

 

Chemistry    246

1 – 3 (crs.)

Introduction to Chemistry Research

Supervised research in chemistry.  Prerequisite: One term of chemistry numbered 105 or higher and consent of instructor. This is a repeatable course for up to six units (crs.).

 

 

Chemistry    291

1 – 5 (crs.)

Selected Topics in Chemistry

Special topics in chemistry.

 

 

Chemistry    303

3 (crs.)

Biochemistry: Clinical Emphases

This course is specifically designed to meet the needs of the Medical Technology students as well as Chemistry majors who choose to follow the Department’s Biochemistry Emphasis. Topics include: Amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, bioenergetics, carbohydrates, lipids, hormones, vitamins, electrolytes, and xenobiotics. Clinical correlations will be presented which emphasize: biochemistry, pathophysiology, and quantification of body fluid constituents.  Prerequisite: Chemistry 335. (Fall/Spring)

 

 

Chemistry    304

1 (crs.)

Biochemistry Laboratory

This course is specifically designed to meet the needs of students needing practical experience in the biochemistry laboratory. This laboratory is required for Medical Technology majors and is recommended for those in other clinically-oriented programs (e.g., premed., prevet.) and for Chemistry majors choosing to follow the Department’s Biochemistry emphasis. Techniques include aspects of spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, chromatography, immunoassays, and fluorescence. A significant amount of writing is expected. Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 303. Special fees may apply.

 

 

Chemistry    310

3 (crs.)

Chemistry Workshop for K-12 Teachers

This course is intended to be a workshop in Chemistry for K-12. The focus will be on activities to improve the effectiveness of the classroom teacher. The course does not apply to any graduate degree program at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. 310/510

 

 

Chemistry    311

4 (crs.)

Analytical Chemistry I

An introduction to the field of analytical chemistry with emphasis on ionic solution equilibria. Specifically, statistical analysis of data, theoretical principles of solubility, acid-base, redox and complex equilibria will be discussed stressing calculations involving system constants and species concentrations. Laboratory techniques include volumetric, potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods with stress on quantitative determinations of inorganic and organic species. Prerequisites: Chemistry 106 with a grade of C or better. Co-requisite of Chemistry 235. Special fees may apply.

 

 

Chemistry    312

3 (crs.)

Analytical Chemistry II

Theory and application of instrumentation to chemical analysis. Topics covered include spectroscopic methods, mass spectrometric techniques and chemical separations. The laboratory will stress instrumental identification of organic and inorganic species, methods comparison and quantitative determination of organic and inorganic species using the above. Credit may not be obtained in both Chemistry 312 and 320. Special fees may apply. Prerequisite: Chemistry 311 with a grade of C or better, Chemistry 370. Special course fees may apply.

 

 

Chemistry    315

3 (crs.)

Advanced Biochemistry

This course is specifically designed for students needing an advanced course in Biochemistry, including Chemistry majors who choose to follow the Department’s Biochemistry or biomolecular Sciences Emphasis. It will build on the topics of thermodynamics, biomolecules (proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates), enzymes mechanisms and biochemical pathways laid down in Chemistry 303, but with an emphasis on research design and discovery. Topics include: bioenergetics, signal transduction, DNA metabolism, RNA metabolism, polypeptide metabolism, and regulation. Prerequisite: Chemistry 303, with a grade of C or better. (Spring)

 

 

Chemistry    320

3 (crs.)

Introduction to Instrumental Analysis

This course introduces a number of modern instrumental techniques that are commonly employed in modern chemical laboratories including absorption spectroscopy, emission spectroscopy, and chromatography. It is designed to meet the needs of Medical Technology majors and Biomolecular Science students. Prerequisites: Chemistry 335 and major in Medical Technology, or Chemistry with  Biomolecular Science Emphasis. Credit may not be obtained in both Chemistry 320 and Chemistry 421. Special fees may apply. (Spring)

 

 

Chemistry    323

3 (crs.)

Analytical Separations

The principles and theoretical foundations, experimental variables, and applications of solvent extraction and the primary chromatographic techniques, including: column, liquid-liquid, ion exchange, think-layer, gas-liquid and other recent modern chromatographic methods.  The laboratory will involve applications of the above to demonstrate the utility of the methods. Special fees may apply. Prerequisite: Chemistry 311, 334 and 335. 323/523 (2+3)

 

 

Chemistry    334

1 (crs.)

Organic Chemistry Lab II

Laboratory experience to complement Organic Chemistry II. Laboratory includes advanced synthesis work and introductory, qualitative organic analysis emphasizing modern spectral techniques. Prerequisites: Chemistry 234 and 235 with a grade of C or better. Co-requisite: Chemistry 335.  334/534. Special course fees may apply.

 

 

Chemistry    335

3 (crs.)

Organic Chemistry II

A continuation of Chemistry 235 which includes a discussion of alcohols, phenols, ethers, carbonyl containing compounds, amines, anilines, carbohydrates and proteins. Particular emphasis is placed on the mechanistic and theoretical aspects of the various topics covered. Infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopes are discussed in a qualitative manner. Prerequisite: Chemistry 235 with a grade of C or better. Special fees may apply. 335/535 (3+3) (Fall-Spring)

 

 

Chemistry    336

1 (crs.)

Advanced Organic Laboratory

A continuation of the laboratory in Chemistry 335, which includes qualitative organic analysis, advanced synthesis and/or independent special projects. Prerequisite: Chemistry 335 with a grade of C or better. 336/536 (0+3)

 

 

Chemistry    360

1 – 3 (crs.)

Special Topics

A chemistry course on a topic not covered in the department’s curriculum. This course may be repeated with different content.  Each time it is offered, the topic will be announced in the class schedule. Graduate students will be required to do an extra project or paper.  Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 360/560

 

 

Chemistry    365

3 (crs.)

Biophysical Chemistry

This course focuses on Thermodynamics, kinetics, chemical equilibria and spectroscopy as they pertain to biological molecules, macromolecules and cells. Prerequisite: Chemistry 303, Math 171 and either Physics 108 or 110. (Fall)

 

 

Chemistry    370

4 (crs.)

Physical Chemistry I

Fundamental principles of physical chemistry. Lecture topics include ideal and real gases, kinetic theory, thermodynamics, equilibria, properties of solutions, surface and colloid chemistry. Laboratory includes experiments that are designed to illustrate the lecture material. Prerequisites: Mathematics 273 (may be taken concurrently), Chemistry 235, and Physics 110 and declared chemistry major or consent of instructor. Special fees may apply. 370/570  (3+3)

 

 

Chemistry    371

4 (crs.)

Physical Chemistry II

A continuation of Chemistry 370. Lecture topics include quantum chemistry, atomic and molecular spectra, and chemical kinetics.  Laboratory includes experiments that are designed to illustrate the lecture material.  Prerequisites: Mathematics 273, Chemistry 311, and Chemistry 370. 371/571 (3+3) Special fees may apply.

 

 

Chemistry    435

3 (crs.)

Interpretive Spectroscopy

The application of spectral methods to the characterization of the structure of inorganic and organic compounds will be presented.  Specific topics will include infrared, Raman, ultraviolet and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopes and mass spectrometry. The laboratory will involve the use of these techniques to identify the structure of unknown samples. Prerequisite: Chemistry 335/535 and Chemistry 334. 435/635 (2+3) Special fees may apply.

 

 

Chemistry    446

1 – 3 (crs.)

Independent Study

Supervised research in chemistry.  See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.  (0+3 to 9) (Fall-Spring)

 

 

Chemistry    452

3 (crs.)

Polymer Science

An introduction to the study of the chemistry of macromolecules including: polymerization reactions and kinetics, physical and chemical characterization methods, and the relationship between chemical and mechanical properties.  Prerequisite: Chemistry 370. 452/652 (2+3)

 

 

Chemistry    456

1 – 3 (crs.)

Related Readings

Supervised readings in Chemistry. See Related Readings under Course and Academic Advisement Policies Information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements. (0+3 to 9) (Fall-Spring)

 

 

Chemistry    470

4 (crs.)

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

An advanced course that focuses on important topics from inorganic chemistry. Topics include: coordination chemistry, bonding models, application of spectroscopy, and other topics of current interest.  Laboratory includes experiments that are designed to illustrate the lecture material.  Prerequisites:  Chemistry 335 and 371, or consent of the instructor. Special fees may apply.  470/670 (3+3).

 

 

Chemistry    474

1 – 6 (crs.)

Honors Thesis

Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student’s major field of study e.g. a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production. Proposals (attached to Independent Study contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be ‘Honors Thesis.’ Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty. Preparation of a formal seminar paper based on research, an industrial internship, and/or a thorough review of a specific area from the chemical literature, followed by an oral seminar based on this paper.  Prerequisite: The Honors College and junior standing. Maximum of 6 units (crs.).

 

 

Chemistry    490

1 (crs.)

Chemistry Seminar I

The student will work with a faculty member adviser to prepare a major research paper involving the student’s own research or a critical analysis of recent scientific literature on an agreed-upon chemical topic. Prerequisite: Chemistry 370 or consent of instructor

 

 

Chemistry    491

1 (crs.)

Chemistry Seminar II

The student will work with a faculty member adviser to prepare and give an oral presentation involving the student’s own research or a critical analysis of recent scientific literature on an agreed-upon chemical topic. Prerequisite: Chemistry 490.

 

 

Chemistry    495

1 – 6 (crs.)

Chemistry Research Internship

An off-campus research experience in an industrial/ academic/governmental laboratory under the joint supervision of the department and participating agency. Prerequisite: Application and admission into the program six months prior to the commencement of the internship. Normally, course work through Chemistry 371 must be completed prior to the internship. (0+3 to 18) (Summer, if available)