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Geography

 

Information

 

Angela Subulwa, Chairperson

Department Office: Sage Hall 4461
Department Telephone: (920) 424-4105

Code 50 or GEOG

 

Faculty

Alberts
Barron
Coulibaly
Cross
Long
Subulwa

Degrees

  • Undergraduate: A major in Geography can lead to the degree(s): Bachelor of Arts; Bachelor of Science.
  • Graduate: None
 

Summary of Fields of Study

1. Goal(s)

  • See the department for a listing of their goal(s).

2. The Major(s)

  • The Department offers one major: 1) Geography.

3. The Minor(s)

  • The Department offers two minors: 1) Geography and 2) Geography for Education majors.
 

Admission/Graduation Requirements

  • To be eligible for the Geography major or minor, students must complete all required core and elective courses with an overall grade point average of 2.00 or better in the Geography curriculum.
  • Students seeking Wisconsin Teacher Certification must complete all required core and elective courses with an overall grade point average of 3.00 or better in the Geography curriculum in order to meet requirements of the College of Education and Human Services.
 

Required Core Courses

  •  See Major
 

The Major(s), with Emphases and/or Options

 

1. Geography Major

  • Required Credits: 45 minimum
  • Required Courses:
    • Geography 102/104 World Regional Geography 
    • Geography 121 Physical Geography I – Weather and Climate 
    • Geography 141 Map Reading and Analysis 
    • Geography 202/204 Human Geography 
    • Geography 221 Physical Geography II – Landforms and Soils 
    • Geography 241 Introduction to GIS
    • Geography 490 Senior Seminar or 491 Capstone 
  • Electives: 24 credits. Students must take courses from at least two of the curriculum groups in the Geography program.  At least 6 credits must be at the 400 level.
    • Human Geography Group: Geography 213, 311, 316, 321, 324, 333, 424, 451.
    • Physical Geography Group: Geography 211, 303, 304, 335, 342, 352, 363, 427, 452, 461.
    • Human-Environment Interaction Group: Geography 314, 364, 377, 414, 419.
    • Regional Geography Group:  Geography 313, 317, 319, 331, 338, 347, 353, 354.
    • Geographic Techniques Group:  Geography 240, 340, 341, 371, 380, 381, 382, 385, 402, 441.
    • Other Group: Geography 395, 399, 444, 446, 456, 474.
 

The Minor(s)

1.  Geography Minor

  • Required Credits: 22 minimum
  • Required Courses:
    • Geography: Geography 102, 121, 141.
    • Electives: 12 credits. Students must take courses from at least two of the curriculum groups in the Geography program: Physical Geography, Human-Environment Interaction, Regional Geography, Geographic Techniques and Other.

 

2.  Geography Minor for Education Majors
Recommended for students who desire a strong geography background for teaching in the elementary schools. This minor can be taken only in combination with a major in Elementary Education.

  • Required Credits: 22 minimum
  • Required Courses:
    • Geography: Geography 102, 121, 141, 313
    • Electives: 9 credits. Students must take courses from at least two of the curriculum groups in the Geography program: Human Geography, Physical Geography, Human-Environment Interaction, Regional Geography, Geographic Techniques and Other.
 

The Certificate(s)

1. GIS Certificate

  • Required Credits: 12 credits
  • Required Courses:
    • Geography: Geography 241, 340, 341, 441
    • Select one elective: Geography 240, 382, 440, 385, Computer Science 142, 221

 

Course Offerings

Geography    101

3 (crs.)

Introduction to Cultural Geography (XS)

This course explores interrelationships between cultural processes and place, asking critical questions about power, inclusion and exclusion, language, race and ethnicity, migration, economy, and environment. Students will apply cultural geography concepts to everyday life and to develop a deeper understanding of current local, national, and global events and issues.

 

 

Geography    102

3 (crs.)

World Regional Geography (XS)(GC)

This course examines the geographical relationships between human societies and cultures, the natural environment, and historical/political changes that have shaped the contemporary world. It is also intended to develop a geographical perspective that fosters international awareness and a better understanding of major global issues.

 

 

Geography    103

3 (crs.)

Roots and Diversity (XS)(ES)

The geography of American ethnic minority groups. An introduction to ethnic geography that examines the experience of people of African, Asian, Hispanic, and Native heritage in the United States and Canada. These ethnic minorities are studied using the major themes of cultural geography such as spatial distribution, migration patterns and locational patterns.

 

 

Geography    104

3 (crs.)

Honors: World Geography (XS) (GC)

A study of the various interrelationships of cultural and physical phenomena as exemplified by major world regions. Intended for those who seek to enhance their knowledge of important world regions. For University Honors students only. Credit will be allowed for only one of Geography 102 or 104. Prerequisites: Enrolled in good standing with The Honors College; prior or concurrent enrollment in HNRS 175.

 

 

Geography    105Q1

3 (crs.)

Geographies of Coffee (XS)(GC)

Coffee is not simply an enjoyable beverage – it dominates the economy, politics, and social structures of entire countries, as well as threads together diverse communities operating at local, regional, national, and global scales. This course examines coffee in detail, as a way of introducing geography as a discipline for understanding both the physical world and human societies. This course explores the physical factors that influence coffee production, the political and economic factors that influence coffee trade, and the cultural factors that influence coffee consumption.

 

 

Geography    106Q1

3 (crs.)

Food, Agriculture, and Soils (XS)

This course introduces students to the basic principles of soils and soil properties, the various types of agricultural systems, and applying sustainability as a lens of inquiry to examine the relationships between agriculture and soils.

 

 

Geography    107Q1

3 (crs.)

Peoples, Places, & Cultures of the World (XS)(GC)

This course will focus on people’s lifeways and cultures around the world from agricultural practices to sports. Students will also examine how people interact with individuals from different cultures and deal with cultural differences.

 

 

Geography    113

3 – 4 (crs.)

Landscapes of North America

A general survey of the characteristics and origins of major natural/physical regions of North America, with emphasis on national parks and monuments and other public areas. Field trip(s) may be required. Special course fees may apply.

 

 

Geography    115

3 (crs.)

Intro to Economic Geography

Analysis of location of population and distribution of leading global economic activities: agriculture, fishing, forestry, mining, manufacturing, transportation, and trade. Field trip(s) may be required.

 

 

Geography    121

4 (crs.)

Physical Geography I – Weather and Climate (XL)

An introductory study of the physical processes and spatial patterns of the earth’s weather and climate and the impacts of climate on vegetation. (3+2)

 

 

Geography    125

4 (crs.)

Physical Geography (XL)

The geography of Earth’s physical characteristics, including weather and climate, climate types, water, soils, Earth materials, landforms, and Earth resources; study of the processes and interactions creating Earth’s physical geographic patterns. Field trip(s) may be required.

 

 

Geography    130

3 (crs.)

Human Impact on the Environment

A natural science course describing the alteration of the physical environment with the resulting effects on air, water, soils, vegetation, animal life and humans. Field trip(s) may be required.

 

 

Geography    141

3 (crs.)

Map Reading Analysis (XS)

This course is designed to study maps as basic tools in geography and other social and natural sciences and as graphical means of communication; to develop skills in map reading and analysis and graphical presentation of quantitative information; to promote the principles of cartographic ethics; and to use acquired knowledge and skills adequately and responsibly in private, professional, and public life.

 

 

Geography    174

3 (crs.)

Disasters – Living on the Edge – No Lab

Study of various environmental hazards, their causes, impacts on humans, and mitigations. Core topics are natural hazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, flooding, landslides, tornadoes, hurricanes), and anthropogenic hazards (climate change/global warming, nuclear hazards, and overpopulation). Additional topics may be covered: coastal hazards, pollution of ground water, air, soil, and water, other atmospheric hazards (extreme weather, droughts), impacts from space, extinctions, biohazards, chemical hazards, and terrorism. This course is cross-listed with Geology/Geography 174.

 

 

Geography    175

3 – 4 (crs.)

Disasters – Living on the Edge (XL)

Study of various environmental hazards, their causes, impacts on humans, and mitigations. Core topics are natural hazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, flooding, landslides, tornadoes, hurricanes), and anthropogenic hazards (climate change/global warming, nuclear hazards, and overpopulation). Additional topics may be covered: coastal hazards, pollution of ground water, air, soil, and water, other atmospheric hazards (extreme weather, droughts), impacts from space, extinctions, biohazards, chemical hazards, and terrorism. This course is cross-listed with Geology/Geography 175.

 

 

Geography    202

3 (crs.)

Human Geography (XS)

The distribution and significance of major elements of culture, such as languages, religions, and political systems, are examined, along with processes that shape cultural landscapes.

 

 

Geography    204

3 (crs.)

Honors: Human Geography (XS)

The nature, distribution, and significance of major elements of human geography. For University Honors students only. Uses exploratory/investigative learning method. Credit will be allowed for only one of Geography 202 or 204. Prerequisites: Enrolled in good standing with the UW Oshkosh Honors Program; prior or concurrent enrollment in HNRS 175.

 

 

Geography    211

3 (crs.)

Geographies of Climate Change (XS)

This course will explore control and feedback processes that govern climate change and climate variability and the impact that a changing climate will have on natural and managed landscapes. In addition, the course will examine how economic, social, cultural, and political dynamics intersect directly with a rapidly changing climate. Prerequisite: Geography 121.

 

 

Geography    213

3 (crs.)

Population Geography (XS)

Population by world regions stressing contrast in numbers, densities, growth rates, and distributional patterns. Current population problems, problem areas, and the methodology by which population growth is predicted.

 

 

Geography    221

4 (crs.)

Physical Geography II – Landforms and Soils (XL)

This course is designed for students to gain a better understanding and appreciation of the processes and functions occurring in the physical environment. You will expand your awareness and recognition of the important concepts, facts, and terminology of the physical environment, the way natural systems function at global, regional and local scales, and the interrelationships between humans and their environment. Prerequisite: Geography 121. Special course fees may apply.

 

 

Geography    225

3 (crs.)

Culture, Health, and Globalization

This course is an exploration of how the health of individuals, communities, and nations are impacted by globalization. The course uses an interdisciplinary approach to analyze the historical, economic, political, and socio-cultural dimensions of health in various regions around the world, including Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, East Asia, Latin America, and Europe. Rather than aiming to arrive at a fixed definition of “globalization” or to theorize the relationship between globalization and human well-being in universal terms, we will ask what is being globalized, how globalization is changing the world, and who is responsible for its consequences. In other words, globalization is tackled as a process with complex and variable implications for local cultures, people’s health and vulnerability to illness.

 

 

Geography    240

3 (crs.)

Mapping Our World (GC) (XS)

In today’s world, an increasing number of people have access to the internet with all of its advantages including web maps and location-based services. These popular and practical tools are supported by Geographic Information Systems (GIS). This course is designed to give students the opportunity to unlock the power of web mapping, and to benefit from and contribute to the local and global GIS and non-GIS community. The course will introduce students to basic cartographic and analytic concepts and principles and give them access to some of the most advanced automated tools for creating web maps, analyzing spatial and temporal distributions and collecting information from anywhere around the globe. As a Global Citizenship course, this class will empower students with the ability to explore places and communities abroad and to address international issues.

 

 

Geography    241

3 (crs.)

Introduction to GIS

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and components of a geographic information system (GIS) and provides students with the technical skills to use a GIS software package (e.g., ArcGIS). GIS involves the collection, management, creation, analysis, and presentation of spatial data. GIS has a wide range of applications such as natural resource management, geomorphology, environmental analysis, social sciences, marketing, economic analysis, planning, emergency management, disease spread, map making, and more.

 

 

Geography    250Q3

3 (crs.)

Sustainability in Theory and Practice (XS)

This course will present the fundamental concepts of sustainability from its beginnings to its establishment as a field of academic inquiry on a wide range of subjects. This class includes field trips, community projects, readings, videos, and discussions of sustainability issues to gain a better understanding and appreciation of the complexity of the interconnections between human and natural systems, and to understand both opportunities for, and challenges to sustainability locally and globally.

 

 

Geography    291

1 – 6 (crs.)

Introduction to Geographic Field Study

Classroom study of an area of geographic interest followed by field study of the area. May be taken for credit more than once if topics are different.

 

 

Geography    297

1 – 3 (crs.)

Intermediate Special Topics in Geography

Designed to cover topics not ordinarily covered in existing courses, or that cannot be accommodated in existing course formats. The topics selected in this course will depend on competencies of available staff and will be announced in the course timetable. May be taken more than once for credit of topics are different.

 

 

Geography    299

1 – 3 (crs.)

Intermediate Independent Study

Individual study under the supervision of an instructor. May be taken more than once for credit if topics are different.

 

 

Geography    303

3 (crs.)

Pyrogeography

This course will examine the physical controls and effects of fire on ecosystems and the management of fire by people over time. Fire is an inherently geographical process. Fire can affect landscapes on spatial scales from local to subcontinental and fire can affect, and be affected by processes that occur on temporal scales from a day to millennia. Prerequisites: Geography 121, Environmental Studies 260, or instructor consent.

 

 

Geography    304

3 (crs.)

Principles of Soil Science

Explores the fundamental principles of soil science and soils as an essential natural resource. Basic concepts in soil science will be presented including: soil genesis; classification and mapping; fertility and productivity; conservation and management; and physical, chemical, and biological properties in relation to the soil environment. Prerequisites: Geography 106; or Geography 221 or Geology 102 or 110 or 150 or consent of instructor.

 

 

Geography    311

3 (crs.)

Economic Geography

This class will explore how economic activity shapes our understanding of human-environment systems. We will examine core economic concepts of production, surplus, labor, exchange of goods and services, and commodities, within the context of different economic, political and social systems to better understand the costs and benefits associated with each. Cross-listed with Environmental Studies (ES 311).

 

 

Geography    313

3 (crs.)

Wisconsin

The interrelationships between the state’s physical environment and its people are stressed. Included are: physiographic history, landscape regions, climate, natural vegetation, soils, population distribution and composition, agricultural patterns, mineral production, manufacturing, and tourism.

 

 

Geography    314

3 (crs.)

Environmental Conservation (GS)

An examination of natural resource utilization, methods of exploitation, policies governing their development, and their relationship to cultural geographic patterns.

Prerequisites: Geography 202, Environmental Studies 282 or consent of instructor.

 

 

Geography    316

3 (crs.)

Ethnic Landscapes of America (ES)

An overview of the cultural landscapes which have shaped the United States. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the contributions of Native Americans and a variety of ethnic minority populations, examining the spatial distributions of these groups and their unique traditions in shaping their landscapes and contrasting their landscapes with that of the Anglo-Saxon majority. Prerequisite: Geography 102 or 202 or History 201 or 202. 316/516

 

 

Geography    317

3 (crs.)

United States and Canada

Emphasis is upon physical, cultural, and economic factors which shape regional landscapes. Population movements, changing agricultural production, recent energy and industrial developments. Prerequisite: Geography 102.

 

 

Geography    319

3 (crs.)

Latin America (GS)

The cultural and physical aspects of Latin America organized by regions and countries. Prerequisite: Geography 102.

 

 

Geography    321

3 (crs.)

Political Geography

An examination of the political factors which influence geographic distributions. Topics considered in this course will include the political organization of space, territory and boundary problems, political conflict and its resolution, problems in the location of public facilities and spatial aspects of voting behavior. Prerequisite Geography 202.

 

 

Geography    324

3 (crs.)

Urban Geography

The origin, development, distribution, and functions of urban places with emphasis on internal area differentiation, growth, and problems of modern cities. Prerequisite Geography 202.

 

 

Geography    331

3 (crs.)

Europe (GS)

A topical analysis of Europe emphasizing the distribution and interrelation of major physical and human features, including landforms, climate, vegetation and soils, population, language, religion, economic activities, settlement patterns, and political organization. Prerequisite: Geography 102.

 

 

Geography    332

3 (crs.)

Introduction to River Systems

Examines the landforms and processes associated with river systems. Topics include drainage basin analysis, fluvial processes, response to disturbance, water quality, sediment erosion and transport, alluvial stratigraphy, and stream/river restoration and management. Prerequisites: Geography 221; or Geology 102; or Geology 110 or Geology 150; or consent of instructor.

 

 

Geography    333

3 (crs.)

Gender, Place, and Culture

This course will explore how the social category of gender and the organization of gender relations are implicated in, constituted by, and maintained through spatial processes. This course examines feminist thought/theories and explores the ways in which geographers have used feminist thought/theories to study and problematize concepts and experiences of the body, home, place, environment, and culture, among other themes. Cross-listed: Geog/Wg Stds 333. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Geog 202, WG Stds 201, 45 credits, or consent of instructor.

 

 

Geography    335

3 (crs.)

Climatology

Atmospheric processes concerned with transfer of heat and moisture including systems of climatic classification and the analysis of climatic types. Prerequisite: Geography 121.

 

 

Geography    338

3 (crs.)

Russian Realm

A topical analysis of the countries of the former Soviet Union emphasizing their physical environment, agricultural and industrial activities, population, language, and political organization. Prerequisite: Geography 102. 338/538

 

 

Geography    340

3 (crs.)

Mapping and Visualization in GIS

This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques for manipulation, graphic representation, and basic analysis of spatial information. Lectures and labs examine the processing, compilation, and symbolization of spatial data and the application of related statistical techniques. Emphasis is placed on the technology of mapping-particularly computer mapping and visualization within the context of Geographic Information Science. Prerequisite: Geography 240 or 241. 340/540 (2+2)

 

 

Geography    341

3 (crs.)

Spatial Analysis in GIS

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) include software, spatial data, computers and other hardware designed to obtain, store, analyze, and display geographic data. This course reinforces the fundamental principles of GIS learned in lower level classes and their use in storing, processing, and analyzing spatial data for a broad range of applications (environmental, social, business, demographic, geologic, etc.) The main goal of the course is to develop proficiency in quantitative analysis of spatially-referenced data. Prerequisites: Geography 241 or 340

 

 

Geography    342

3 (crs.)

Meteorology

This course will explore atmospheric and surface interactions that control weather over a ranger of temporal and spatial scales; and provide an introduction to the analysis and interpretation of weather models as they pertain to weather forecasting. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Geography 121.

 

 

Geography    347

3 (crs.)

Asia-Pacific

In a broad arc from Japan to Indonesia, the Asian countries facing the Pacific Ocean contain a third of the world’s population and have become a gigantic force in the global economy. This course considers the region’s fascinating physical landscapes, its complex cultural tapestries, and its dynamic economic geography. The course emphasizes both the variation within Asia as well as the region’s connections to the broader world. Prerequisite: Geography 102.

 

 

Geography    352

3 (crs.)

Landscape Morphology

Processes of landform evolution. Analysis of landforms and interpretation of the physical landscape using topographic maps, aerial photographs, and topographic models. Prerequisite: Geography 122 or 221 or Geology 102.

 

 

Geography    353

3 (crs.)

Sub-Saharan Africa (GS)

An analysis of the distribution and interrelation of the physical and cultural characteristics of sub-Saharan Africa. Includes the study of the development, present conditions, and problems of particular regions and countries. Prerequisite: Geography 102. 353/553

 

 

Geography    354

3 (crs.)

Middle East and North Africa (GS)

A topical analysis of the Middle East and North Africa with emphasis on the physical environment and natural resources, cultural patterns, and spatial aspects of geopolitical relations. Prerequisite: Geography 102.

 

 

Geography    363

3 (crs.)

Biogeography

This course focuses on the processes and mechanisms that govern species distributions over time, their history, and the impacts of environmental change on those distributions. Prerequisites: Geography 221, Geology 109, 110, 150, Biology 105 or instructor consent. Special course fees may apply.

 

 

Geography    364

3 (crs.)

Water Resource Management

A study of the characteristics and behavior of water on a global scale. Emphasis on the geographic location of water, its significance, its use by man, and the problems of water management. Prerequisite: 8 units (crs.) of Physical Geography or Physical Geology.

 

 

Geography    377

3 (crs.)

Population and Environment

Examination of the relationship between population and environment, particularly the importance of demographic change in shaping the environment, forces that influence this relationship, theoretical perspectives used in the analysis of population-environment relationship, and how population dynamics affect various aspects of environmental change.  The topics are studied from historical and global perspectives with comparisons of population-environmental change.  The topics are studied from historical and global perspectives with comparisons of population-environmental links in various parts of the world and those in the United States.  Prerequisites: Geography 102, 202 or 213; or Environmental Studies 211; or consent of instructor.

 

 

Geography    380

3 (crs.)

Research Methods

Defining geographic problems, design of research projects, data collection, analysis of data using cartographic and statistical techniques, and research report writing.

 

 

Geography    382

3 (crs.)

Remote Sensing of the Environment

The focus is on the interpretation and application of data obtained by major remote sensing techniques to the detection and monitoring of the physical and cultural landscape.  Includes orbital and suborbital photography, electronic sensing in the ultraviolet, thermal, passive and active microwave and multispectral. Prerequisite: Geography 121 or 240 or 241.

 

 

Geography    385

3 (crs.)

Quantitative Methods in Geography

This course emphasizes the application of statistical techniques, especially spatial statistics, to a wide variety of geographical and environmental problems. Students will learn how to choose among descriptive and inferential statistical techniques, to correctly apply those techniques and then interpret the results. Students will also learn how to use the statistical software package SPSS. Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or math placement higher than Mathematics 104.

 

 

Geography    395

1 (crs.)

Colloquium in Geography

Overview of current research and professional developments within the various subfields of geography. Prerequisite: Geography or Urban Planning major or minor with junior or senior standing. (May be repeated for up to 3 units (crs.), with course being graded on a pass/fail basis.)

 

 

Geography    399

1 – 8 (crs.)

Study Tour

Background readings, field lectures, a trip log, and a comprehensive paper are required under the direction of the geography staff person in charge. Information on fees, transportation, and trip expenses available in a separate announcement.

 

 

Geography    402

3 (crs.)

Field Methods in Geography

Techniques of field observations and geographic analysis. Various methods of collecting field data applied to both physical and cultural landscapes. Area of field study alternates between the Oshkosh area and more distant locations. Contact instructor for application materials and information on special course fees. Prerequisite: 18 units (crs.) cumulative of Geography, Urban Planning, Environmental Studies, and Geology; or consent of instructor. (1+4)

 

 

Geography    414

3 (crs.)

Natural Resource Management

Examines techniques for the biophysical and socio-economic analysis of natural environments. The course will emphasize the variety of perspectives from which environmental management policies and modeling tools can be developed. Prerequisite: Geography 314. 414/614

 

 

Geography    419

3 (crs.)

Natural Hazards

Examination of various atmospheric and geologic events which threaten human activities. The physical characteristics of the threats, human perceptions of the threats, and various hazard mitigation measures (including structural adjustments, land use planning, and evacuation preparations) will be studied. Prerequisite: 8 units (crs.) of Physical Geography or Geology. 419/619

 

 

Geography    421

3 (crs.)

Global Human Rights Issues

This course examines global human rights issues through a geographic lens. Using case studies from around the world we will study human rights documents, critically discuss explanations for human rights abuses, and evaluate measures to stop or prevent human rights violations. Prerequisites: Geography 202 and 6 credits from the following courses: Geog 213, 319, 321, 331, 333, 353, 354, 377, or instructor consent.

 

 

Geography    427

3 (crs.)

Ice Age Earth

This course will explore the climate system at a range of temporal and spatial scales from global to local and millennial to seasonal. With an understanding of this framework, we will then turn to how ecosystems and societies have responded to changes in climate in the past and the challenges that ecosystems and global societies will face as climate changes in the near future. Prerequisites: 6 credits of lab science, 9 credits of geography, or instructor consent.

 

 

Geography    440

3 (crs.)

Thematic Cartography

An introduction to the design and production of thematic maps. The course will acquaint students with basic concepts of thematic cartography, develop their skills in computer graphics and thematic map design and production, and enhance greater appreciation for thematic maps as communication, reference, and research tools.

 

 

Geography    441

3 (crs.)

Advanced GIS

This course examines advanced concepts and techniques of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Topics include introductory level algorithm development, applications survey and readings, and advanced spatial analysis. Students are expected to develop individual, problem-driven projects which incorporate the knowledge, tools, and techniques that are developed in this course. Prerequisite: Geography 341

 

 

Geography    444

1 – 6 (crs.)

Internship in Geography

An employment experience in which students apply their skills in any subfield of human or physical geography while working under direct supervision of a professional. May be taken up to a maximum of 6 credits.

 

 

Geography    446

1 – 3 (crs.)

Independent Study

See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.

 

 

Geography    451

3 (crs.)

Special Topics in Human Geography

This course will provide an in-depth examination of a specific topic in human geography. Special emphasis will be placed on recognition, analysis, and problem solving within the topic area. Prerequisite: Geography 102, 202, Junior standing and consent of instructor. 451/651

 

 

Geography    452

3 (crs.)

Earth Transformed

Earth is a dynamic planet that is constantly changing. Prior to humans, these changes were driven by natural events and cycles. Since the evolution of humans, particularly since the advent of agriculture, humans have played an increasing role in the evolution of Earth. This course will introduce students to the dynamic nature of Earth, the natural and anthropogenic drivers of change, and how humans have altered the various components of the earth system. Prerequisites: 8 credits of lab science, or 9 credits of geography courses, or instructor consent.

 

 

Geography    456

1 – 3 (crs.)

Related Readings

See Related Readings under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.

 

 

Geography    461

3 (crs.)

Special Topics in Physical Geography

This course will provide an in-depth examines a specific topic in physical geography. Special emphasis will be placed on recognition, analysis, and problem solving within the topic area. Prerequisite: Geography 121, (122 or 221)  and Junior standing and consent of instructor. 461/661

 

 

Geography    474

1 – 6 (crs.)

Honors: Thesis

Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student’s major field of study e.g., a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production. Proposals (attached to Independent Study contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be Honors Thesis. Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty. Prerequisite: The Honors College and junior standing. Maximum of 6 units (crs.).

 

 

Geography    490

3 (crs.)

Geography Senior Seminar

A capstone seminar for the Geography program in which the student’s ability to integrate geographic concepts, knowledge, and techniques from previous Geography courses is demonstrated. Prerequisite: 24 credits in Geography of which 3 credits are at 400 level, and senior standing.

 

 

Geography    491

1 (crs.)

Geography Senior Capstone

A Capstone seminar for the Geography program in which the student’s ability to integrate geographic concepts, knowledge, and techniques from previous Geography courses is demonstrated. To be taken in association with an approved 400-level Geography course. Not available if GEOG 490 is offered. Prerequisite: 21 elective units in Geography, senior standing, and consent of instructor of approved 400-level Geography course.

 

 

Urban Planning    131

3 (crs.)

Introduction to Urban Studies (XS)

An introductory course which examines some of the major contemporary issues confronting American cities including crime, poverty, education, housing, transportation, and the environment. The course will draw on guest lecturers from government agencies.

 

 

Urban Planning    250Q3

3 (crs.)

Urban Sustainability (XS)

The course focuses on issues of environmental sustainability within an urban context. Students will explore the definition of sustainability and examine methods to measure sustainability. The course will examine potentially sustainable solutions, such as urban growth boundaries, public transportation, and green buildings. The course will also consider questions, such as the differential impact of the pollution on disadvantaged population groups and on human health. Each student will complete a substantial community engagement project examining an aspect of urban sustainability in Oshkosh and document this experience in a term paper and group presentation to classmates and community representatives.

 

 

Urban Planning    260Q3

3 (crs.)

Community Development (XS)

Community development, as its best, focuses on empowering community residents with the (civic) knowledge and skills that enable them to make and implement decisions about their future and the future of their community. It is a set of values and practices encouraging collective and collaborative work, equality and justice, learning and reflecting, participation, political awareness and sustainable change. Additionally, community development acknowledges and focuses on overcoming the divisions, social exclusions and discrimination that deter some people in communities from participating in activities and decision-making. Gaining an understanding how people understand and engage in community life will enable us to straighten our communities and enrich our lives. In this course students will actively engage in community development in Oshkosh. Students will assist neighborhood residents and organizations study their physical and social environment and collect data, generate information and increase their civic knowledge to enable residents to develop strategies which can improve the well-being of their children, families, and neighborhoods.

 

 

Urban Planning    300

3 (crs.)

Introduction to Urban Planning

An overview of urban planning including the history of planning, major types of planning techniques and theory, values of planners, and strategies for planning effectiveness. Prerequisites: Urban Planning 131, 250, or 260 and 45 credits earned. 300/500

 

 

Urban Planning    317

3 (crs.)

Land Use Regulation

An overview of the purposes, theoretical and legal issues, tools, and techniques of land use planning and regulation. 317/517

 

 

Urban Planning    320

3 (crs.)

Housing

An overview of urban housing including its recent history, the nature of the housing market, the impact of housing on society, government regulation and assistance, and new housing patterns.  Prerequisites: Urban Planning 300/500 (may be taken concurrently with Urban Planning 320/520)  320/520

 

 

Urban Planning    350

3 (crs.)

Planning History and Theory

This core course provides students with knowledge about the origins of urban planning and the ideas that justify its practice. Students will learn how the field has evolved over the last two centuries and how an appreciation for the recent history can enhance future plans. The course also provides an overview of theoretical frameworks and normative briefs that have shaped the field in crucial ways. Prerequisites: 12 credits of Urban Planning.

 

 

Urban Planning    351

3 (crs.)

Planning Seminar (SS)

Emphasis on application of theory to particular problems. Prerequisite: Urban Planning 300.

 

 

Urban Planning    360

3 (crs.)

Real Estate Development Process

This course introduces students to the process of real estate development. Students will gain knowledge of the role of real estate developers, financial institutions, and the public sector in the real estate development process. The course will acquaint students with the process of site selection, design and construction, financial analysis, and marketing of real estate. Prerequisites: Urban Planning 317 and Urban Planning 320.

 

 

Urban Planning    410

1 – 3 (crs.)

Special Topics

A seminar type course to suit special, one-time-only situations. Prerequisite: Urban Planning 300 with a grade of C or better.

 

 

Urban Planning    420

4 (crs.)

Site Planning Studio

This studio course in urban planning provides hands-on experience in developing a site plan. Using an actual site, a project will be taken through the various stages of plan development. Activities include program analysis, data collection, development of alternative solutions, and selection and presentation of a final site plan. Special fees may apply. Prerequisites: Urban Planning 317 and consent of instructor; strongly recommended: Geography 371 or Practical Arts 102 or Theatre 203.

 

 

Urban Planning    425

3 (crs.)

Computer Uses in Urban Analysis

Students will gain a knowledge of electronic data processing and analytical skills appropriate to entry level requirements in urban management positions, in particular analyses and effective display of socio-economic trends and other types of data. Case studies utilized. Prerequisites: Urban Planning 131, Geography 391 with a grade of C or better, Geography 471 (may be taken concurrent with Urban Planning 425).

 

 

Urban Planning    446

1 – 3 (crs.)

Independent Study

See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements. Prerequisite: Urban Planning 351 with a grade of B or better.

 

 

Urban Planning    456

1 – 3 (crs.)

Related Readings

See Related Readings under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements. Prerequisites: Urban Planning 350 and Urban Planning 351 with a grade of B or better in both courses.

 

 

Urban Planning    471

1 – 3 (crs.)

Field Experience

Introduces students to a wide variety of government units and individuals; improves writing skills. Weekly assignments are based on reports of meetings attended which are critiqued on the basis of form and content. Prerequisite: Urban Planning 351 with a grade of C or better.

 

 

Urban Planning    474

3 (crs.)

Honors: Thesis

Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student’s major field of study, e.g., a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production. Proposals (attached to Independent Study contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be ‘Honors Thesis.’ Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty. Maximum of 6 units (crs.). Prerequisite: University Honors status and 100 credits towards degree.

 

 

Urban Planning    480

1 – 6 (crs.)

Internship

A work experience in which students  work sixty-six and two-third hours (66.67) per unit (cr.) under the direct supervision of a person engaged in some phase of urban and regional planning and management. Prerequisite: Urban Planning 351 with a grade of C or better.