English Course Offerings

English courses are a core part of the University Studies Program (USP), UW Oshkosh’s general education program, and are open to all majors.

View our full course list in the UW Oshkosh bulletin, or view course offerings by semester below.

View First-Year Writing courses schedule here.

Summer 2020 Course Offerings

Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 191
Instructor: Aaron Dunckel
Day/Time: ONLINE First 4 Wks

 


Advanced Writing

Course Number: 312
Section: 191
Instructor: Domenic Bruni
Day/Time: ONLINE First 4 Wks

 

Advanced Writing

Course Number: 312
Section: 193
Instructor: Kristin Vielbig
Day/Time: ONLINE 8 Wks

 


 

 

 

Fall 2020 Course Offerings

Foundations of College English 

Course Number: 100
Section: 001
Instructor: Samantha Looker-Koenigs
Day/Time: TR 11:30-12:30

 

Foundations of College English 

Course Number: 100
Section: 002
Instructor: Samantha Looker-Koenigs
Day/Time: TR 1:20-2:20

 

Foundations of College English 

Course Number: 100
Section: 003
Instructor: Karl Boehler
Day/Time: MF 9:10-10:10

 

Foundations of College English 

Course Number: 100
Section: 004
Instructor: Jennifer Donath
Day/Time: MF 12:40-1:40

 


Honors: Composition

Course Number: 110
Section: 001
Instructor: Don Dingledine
Day/Time: 9:40 – 11:10 TR

 

Honors: Composition

Course Number: 110
Section: 002
Instructor: Cary Henson
Day/Time: MWF 10:20-11:20


British Literature to 18th Century

Course Number: 151Q1
Section: 001
Instructor: Karl Boehler
Day/Time: 11:30 – 12:30 MWF

 

British Literature to 18th Century

Course Number: 151Q1
Section: 002
Instructor: Crystal Mueller
Day/Time: 1:20 – 2:50 TR


American Literature through Civil War

Course Number: 153Q1
Section: 001
Instructor: Ron Rindo
Day/Time: 1:20 – 2:50 TR


American Lit After Civil War

Course Number: 154Q1
Section: 001
Instructor: Stephen McCabe
Day/Time: MWF 9:10-10:10


Multi-Ethnic Literature

Course Number: 168Q1
Section: 001
Instructor: Jordan Landry
Day/Time: TR 9:40-11:10

 


Intro to Creative Writing

Course Number: 204
Section: 001
Instructor: Laura Jean Baker
Day/Time: TR 9:40-11:10

 


Intro to Creative Writing

Course Number: 204
Section
Instructor: Ron Rindo
Day/Time: TR 11:30-1:00


Lit Global Perspectives

Course Number: 205
Section: 381F
Instructor
Day/Time: STUDY ABROAD


Classical & Medieval Writing

Course Number: 210
Section: 301
Instructor: Duke Pesta
Day/Time: 9:00pm-12:00pm INTERIM MTWRF


British Literature I

Course Number: 211
Section: 001
Instructor: Duke Pesta
Day/Time: TR 9:40-11:10

 

British Literature I

Course Number: 211
Section: 002
Instructor: Vivian Foss
Day/Time: MWF 10:20-11:20

 


American Literature

Course Number: 213
Section: 001
Instructor: Adam Ochonicky
Day/Time: MW 1:50-3:20


American Literature II

Course Number: 214
Section: 001
Instructor: Domenic Bruni
Day/Time: INTERIM 9:00-12:00

 


Multi-Ethnic Literature

Course Number: 218
Section: 191
Instructor: Kristin Vielbig
Day/Time: ONLINE


African American Literature

Course Number: 219
Section: 001
Instructor: Roberta Maguire
Day/Time: 11:30 – 1:00 TR

 

African American Literature

Course Number: 219
Section: 002
Instructor: Roberta Maguire
Day/Time: TR 1:20-2:50

 


Native American Literature

Course Number: 220
Section: 001
Instructor: Kristin Vielbig
Day/Time: MWF 12:40-1:40

 


Young Adult Literature

Course Number: 223
Section: 001
Instructor: Diane Crotty
Day/Time: MW 1:50-3:20


Women in Literature

Course Number: 224
Section: 001
Instructor: Julie Shaffer
Day/Time:  TR 8:00-9:30

 

Women in Literature

Course Number: 224
Section: 002
Instructor: Julie Shaffer
Day/Time: MW 3:30-5:00


Modern American Literature

Course Number: 226
Section: 001
Instructor: Robert Feldman
Day/Time: MWF 9:10 – 10:10

 

Modern American Literature

Course Number: 226
Section: 002
Instructor: Jennifer Donath
Day/Time: MWF 10:20-11:20


Modern World Literature

Course Number: 227
Section: 191
Instructor: Cary Henson
Day/Time: ONLINE


Modern World Literature

Course Number: 227q2
Section: 001
Instructor: Christine Roth
Day/Time: TR 8:00 – 9:30


Honors: Modern American Literature 

Course Number: 228
Section: 001
Instructor: Robert Feldman
Day/Time: 1:50 – 2:50 MWF

 


Honors: African American Literature 

Course Number: 229
Section: 001
Instructor: Don Dingledine
Day/Time: TR 11:30-1

 


Literature & Film

Course Number: 231
Section: 001
Instructor: Loren Baybrook
Day/Time: W 3:00 – 6:00 

 

Literature & Film

Course Number: 231
Section: 301
Instructor: Cary Henson
Day/Time: 9:00 – 12:00 INTERIM


Intro to Nature Writing

Course Number: 243
Section: 001
Instructor: Douglas Haynes
Day/Time: TR 11:30-1:00

 

Intro to Nature Writing

Course Number: 243
Section: 002
Instructor: Douglas Haynes
Day/Time: TR 1:20 – 2:50


Intro to Shakespeare

Course Number: 247
Section: 001
Instructor: Kelley Duhatschek
Day/Time: MWF 11:30-12:30


Intro to English Study

Course Number: 281
Section: 001
Instructor: Samantha Looker-Koenigs
Day/Time: TR 9:40 -11:00 


Speaking Globally

Course Number: 283
Section: 191
Instructor: Margaret Hostetler
Day/Time:  ONLINE


Advanced Writing

Course Number: 287
Section: 001
Instructor: Adam Ochonicky
Day/Time: TR 1:20-2:50

 

Advanced Writing

Course Number: 287
Section: 002
Instructor: Adam Ochonicky
Day/Time: TR 11:30-1:00

Advanced Writing

Course Number: 287
Section: 191
Instructor: Cary Henson
Day/Time: ONLINE

Advanced Writing

Course Number: 287
Section: 192
Instructor: Jennifer Donath
Day/Time: ONLINE

 


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 288
Section: 001
Instructor: Robert Feldman
Day/Time: TR 8:00-9:30

 

Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 288
Section: 002
Instructor: Valerie Jahns
Day/Time: TR 8:00 – 9:30

 

Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 288
Section: 003
Instructor: Loren Baybrook
Day/Time: TR 9:40-11:10

 

Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 288
Section: 004
Instructor: Loren Baybrook
Day/Time: TR 11:30-1:00

 

Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 288
Section: 005
Instructor: Domenic Bruni
Day/Time: TR 8:00-9:30

 

Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 288
Section: 007
Instructor: Julie Shaffer
Day/Time: TR 9:40-11:10

 

Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 288
Section: 008
Instructor: Kelley Duhatschek
Day/Time: MWF 9:10-10:10

 

Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 288
Section: 009
Instructor: Aaron Dunckel
Day/Time: MWF 1:50-2:50

 

Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 288
Section: 010
Instructor: Vivian Foss
Day/Time: MWF 11:30-12:30

 

Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 288
Section: 011
Instructor: Diane Crotty
Day/Time: MWF 12:40-1:40

 

Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 288
Section: 012
Instructor: Angela Williamson
Day/Time: MWF 12:40-1:40

 

Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 288
Section: 013
Instructor: Aaron Dunckel
Day/Time: MWF 10:20-11:20

 

Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 288
Section: 301
Instructor: Aaron Dunckel
Day/Time: INTERIM 9:00-12:00

 

Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 288
Section: 302
Instructor: Scott Emmert
Day/Time: INTERIM 12:00 -3:00

 


Modern Grammar

Course Number: 301
Section: 301
Instructor: Margaret Hostetler
Day/Time: INTERIM 12:00-3:00

 


Creative Writing: Poetry 1

Course Number: 305
Section: 001
Instructor: Abayomi Animashaun
Day/Time: MW 1:50-3:20

 


Autobio Theory and Practice

Course Number: 308
Section: 001
Instructor: Laura Jean Baker
Day/Time: TR 1:20-2:50

 


Honors: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 310
Section: 001
Instructor: Christine Roth
Day/Time: TR 11:30-1:00


Honors: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 310
Section: 002
Instructor:  Adam Ochonicky
Day/Time: MW 3:30-5:00


Shakespeare I 

Course Number: 347
Section: 001
Instructor: Christine Roth
Day/Time: TR 9:40-11:10

“There Shakespeare, on whose forehead climb
The crowns o’ the world; oh, eyes sublime
With tears and laughter for all time!”

            ~Elizabeth Barrett Browning

This course is an upper-division survey of key works by William Shakespeare. Specifically, we will study Romeo and JulietJulius Caesar, HamletMacbeth, and The Tempest, as well as a selection of sonnets. In doing so, we will gain an understanding of some of the major cultural, social and intellectual issues of importance to Shakespeare and his contemporaries; appreciate the formal conventions and forms of his drama and poetry; and explore a sampling of critical approaches (such as postcolonial and ecocritical) that highlight the ways in which Shakespeare’s work resonates with today’s audience.

 


 Literary Animal Studies (OC)

Course Number: 360
Section: 001
Instructor: Stewart Cole
Day/Time: MWF 11:30-12:30

This course serves as an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of animal studies through the methodologies of the humanities in general and English in particular (i.e., close reading, textual analysis, and close attention to historical, philosophical, and theoretical contexts). Recognizing that we tend to reserve the term “animal” for nonhuman animals, this course sets out to examine how and why we as a species draw this categorical line, and to interrogate what is at stake in maintaining this conceptual boundary between human and nonhuman animals. Because this a class in specifically literary animals studies, particular emphasis will be of course be placed on representations of nonhuman animals in fiction and poetry — and how such representations have often served to nuance and challenge received notions of the human/animal divide. Topics to be examined include animals as food, the legal status of animals, anthropomorphism, the genetic manipulation of animals, animal emotion and language, animals as pets, and hunting.

 


Modern British Fiction (OC)

Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, and Fantasy Literature
(English 365, Modern British Lit)
 
Class focus is J.R. R. Tolkien’s invention of fantasy literature. Besides The Lord of the Rings, we read the Silmarillion, Tolkien’s mythological account of the First Age of Middle Earth. It tells of the creation and exploits of the High Elves, the rise of Sauron, and Numenor, the Kingdom of the Men of the West. We’ll also learn to speak some Quenya, a main language of the Elves.
 
Course Number: 365
Section: 001
Instructor: Duke Pesta
Day/Time: TR 11:30-1:00

 


 

African Literature

Course Number: 367
Section: 001
Instructor: Abayomi Animashaun
Day/Time: W 5:00-8:00

 


American Romanticism

Course Number: 374
Section: 001
Instructor: Robert Feldman
Day/Time: MWF 12:40-1:40


Foundations of Literature

Course Number: 381
Section: 001
Instructor: Loren Baybrook
Day/Time: TR 1:20-2:50


Intro to Linguistics

Course Number: 383
Section: 001
Instructor: Margaret Hostetler
Day/Time: 5:00 – 8:00 T


Professional & Digital Writing (OC)

Course Number: 385
Section: 001
Instructor: Adam Ochonicky
Day/Time: MWF 9:10-10:10

Whether posting memes on social media, accentuating a text message with an emoji, or simply writing an email, we are habitually engaged in digital writing. Such rhetorical acts make demands on us as both readers and writers. Out of necessity, we continuously move between written and audiovisual forms of communication in online environments. We use digital tools—laptops, tablets, smart phones—while rapidly shifting between professional and personal contexts. In short, digital writing requires flexible skills and a heightened awareness of audience.

This course examines the deeper meanings of particular types of digital writing. More precisely, we will explore mediated forms of curating, archiving, and sharing our lives. These categories encompass a variety of practices related to personal expression, such as how we construct virtual identities on social media platforms or the ways in which we preserve personal memories with digital methods. Given the hybrid—or multimodal—nature of digital writing, we’ll be considering a wide range of materials, including works of scholarship from the field of media studies. For media scholars, there are values embedded within the very design of our devices and the interfaces on our screens. By encountering scholarly readings on these topics and reflecting on how we curate, archive, and share our lives online, we will recognize the complex impacts of such digital writing practices—on levels that span the individual and the cultural. In addition to traditional reading and writing assignments, coursework will also include creative projects on digital platforms throughout the semester.

 


Special Topics in Literature: Science and Literature (OC)

Course Number: 392
Section: 001
Instructor: Pascale Manning
Day/Time: MW 1:50-3:20

Is the human restricted to abiding by the laws of nature? What if we transgressed against those laws – what then? What does an individual death signify in a world where species that have endured for epochs may go extinct? What might it be like to witness a new lifeform taking shape? Are the operations of our own minds hidden even from ourselves? Is it possible to overcome our instincts? These are among the questions asked by the literature written during the age that gave us the theories of deep geological time, of evolution, and of the unconscious mind. When read in the context of these theories, works by authors such as Mary Shelley, Alfred Tennyson, Charles Dickens, Robert Browning, Matthew Arnold, George Eliot, Robert Louis Stevenson, Thomas Hardy, Bram Stoker, H.G. Wells, and Ian McEwan reveal the interplay of ideas between what might seem to be different fields of inquiry. In this course we will explore how the literary imagination can lend living artistic embodiment to scientific ideas, helping us to make sense of the explanations that science affords us about the operations of the earth, our bodies, and our minds.

ENG 392 counts automatically for Area D but may be applied to Area A1 with instructor permission.


Seminar English Studies (OC)

Course Number: 481
Section: 001
Instructor: Roberta Maguire
Day/Time: MW 3:30- 5:00

English 481: Toni Morrison’s Beloved

In this section of the capstone course for the major, we will focus on Toni Morrison’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel Beloved, a neo-slave narrative published in 1987. The time of the novel shifts between the pre- and post-Civil War eras, which will require us to study those historical moments. But we will also consider when the novel was published and the discourses of that era with which Beloved engages. And we will explore the novel’s style and aesthetic dimensions, including Morrison’s use of magical realism. During the semester students will lead discussion twice, prepare occasional response papers, and develop a major seminar project that connects with our work on Beloved, in addition to completing the portfolio for the major

 


Shakespeare I

Course Number: 547
Section: 001
Instructor: Christine Roth
Day/Time: TR 9:40-11:10

“There Shakespeare, on whose forehead climb
The crowns o’ the world; oh, eyes sublime
With tears and laughter for all time!”

            ~Elizabeth Barrett Browning

This course is an upper-division survey of key works by William Shakespeare. Specifically, we will study Romeo and JulietJulius Caesar, HamletMacbeth, and The Tempest, as well as a selection of sonnets. In doing so, we will gain an understanding of some of the major cultural, social and intellectual issues of importance to Shakespeare and his contemporaries; appreciate the formal conventions and forms of his drama and poetry; and explore a sampling of critical approaches (such as postcolonial and ecocritical) that highlight the ways in which Shakespeare’s work resonates with today’s audience.


Foundations of Literature

Course Number: 581
Section: 001
Instructor: Loren Baybrook
Day/Time: TR 1:20-2:50


Intro to Linguistics

Course Number: 583
Section: 001
Instructor: Margaret Hostetler
Day/Time: 5:00 – 8:00 T


Seminar in Lit (OC)

Course Number: 701
Section: 001
Instructor: Abayomi Animashaun
Day/Time: M 5:00 – 8:00

Spring 2020 Course Offerings

WBIS Course Schedule click here

Foundations of College English 

Course Number: 100
Section: 001
Instructor: Donath
Day/Time: 12:40-1:40 MF


Foundations of College English 

Course Number: 100
Section: 002
Instructor: Boehler
Day/Time: 9:10-10:10 MW


Foundations of College English 

Course Number: 100
Section: 003
Instructor: Baker
Day/Time: 1:50-2:50 MW


Honors: Composition

Course Number: 110
Section: 001
Instructor: Maguire
Day/Time: 1:50-3:20 MW


Honors: Composition

Course Number: 110
Section: 002
Instructor: Henson
Day/Time: 10:20-11:20 MWF


Intro to Creative Writing

Course Number: 204
Section: 001
Instructor: McCabe
Day/Time: 10:20-11:20 MWF


Intro to Creative Writing

Course Number: 204
Section: 002
Instructor: Niesen
Day/Time: W 6:00-9:00


Intro to Creative Writing

Course Number: 204
Section: 301
Instructor: Haynes
Day/Time: MTWRF (Interim) 9:00-12:00


Lit Global Perspectives

Course Number: 205
Section: 381F
Instructor: Cole
Day/Time: STUDY ABROAD


Classical & Medieval Writing

Course Number: 210
Section: 001
Instructor: Boehler
Day/Time: 10:20-11:20 MWF 


British Literature I

Course Number: 211
Section: 001
Instructor: Foss
Day/Time: 11:30-12:30 MWF


British Literature I

Course Number: 211Q2
Section: 001
Instructor: Roth
Day/Time: 9:40-1:10 TR


American Literature

Course Number: 214
Section: 001
Instructor: Crotty
Day/Time: 9:10-10:10 MWF


American Literature

Course Number: 214
Section: 002
Instructor: Baybrook
Day/Time: 1:20-2:50 TR


Multi-Ethnic Literature

Course Number: 218
Section: 001
Instructor: Animashaun
Day/Time: 1:50-3:20 MW


Multi-Ethnic Literature

Course Number: 218
Section: 291
Instructor: Vielbig
Day/Time: ONLINE


African American Literature

Course Number: 219
Section: 001
Instructor: Maguire
Day/Time: 11:30 – 1:00 TR


African American Literature

Course Number: 219
Section: 002
Instructor: Maguire
Day/Time: 1:20-2:50 TR


Native American Literature

Course Number: 220
Section: 001
Instructor: Vielbig
Day/Time: 10:20-11:20 MWF


Women in Literature

Course Number: 224
Section: 001
Instructor: Shaffer
Day/Time: 8:00 – 9:30 TR


Women in Literature

Course Number: 224
Section: 001
Instructor: Baker
Day/Time: 11:30-12:30 MWF


Women in Literature

Course Number: 224
Section: 002
Instructor: Shaffer
Day/Time: 8:00-9:30 TR


Modern American Literature

Course Number: 226
Section: 001
Instructor: Feldman
Day/Time: 9:10 – 10:10 MWF


Modern American Literature

Course Number: 226
Section: 002
Instructor: Feldman
Day/Time: 12:40-1:40 MWF


Modern American Literature

Course Number: 226
Section: 003
Instructor: Baker
Day/Time: 3:00-6:00 M


Modern World Literature

Course Number: 226Q2
Section: 001
Instructor: Crotty
Day/Time: 12:40-1:40 MWF


Modern World Literature

Course Number: 227
Section: 001
Instructor: Ngaboh-Smart
Day/Time: 11:30-1:00 TR


Modern World Literature

Course Number: 227
Section: 002
Instructor: Henson
Day/Time: 1:50-3:20 MW


Modern World Literature

Course Number: 227
Section: 291
Instructor: Henson
Day/Time: ONLINE


Honors: African American Literature 

Course Number: 229
Section: 001
Instructor: Dingledine
Day/Time: 11:30-1:00 TR


Literature & Film

Course Number: 231
Section: 001
Instructor: Baybrook
Day/Time: 11:30-1:00 TR


Literature & Film

Course Number: 231
Section: 301
Instructor: Bruni
Day/Time: 9:00 – 12:00 INTERIM


Foundations of Western Literature

Course Number: 236
Section: 301
Instructor: Pesta
Day/Time: 9:00 – 12:00 MTWRF (Interim)


Intro to Nature Writing

Course Number: 243
Section: 001
Instructor: Rindo
Day/Time: 1:20-2:50 TR


Intro to Shakespeare

Course Number: 247
Section: 001
Instructor: Roth
Day/Time: 8:00-9:30 TR


Intro to English Study

Course Number: 281
Section: 001
Instructor: Manning
Day/Time: 1:50-3:20 MW


Literary Landscapes

Course Number: 294Q3
Section: 371F
Instructor: Cole
Day/Time: STUDY ABROAD


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 001
Instructor: Rindo
Day/Time: 8:00 – 9:30 TR


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 002
Instructor: Rindo
Day/Time: 9:40 – 11:10 TR


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 003
Instructor: Dunckel
Day/Time: 10:20-11:20 MWF


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 004
Instructor: Dunckel
Day/Time: 12:40-1:40 MWF


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 005
Instructor: Shaffer
Day/Time: 1:50-3:20 MW


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 006
Instructor: Shaffer
Day/Time: 3:30-5:00 MW


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 007
Instructor: Feldman
Day/Time: 1:20-2:50 TR


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 009
Instructor: Haynes
Day/Time: 1:20-2:50 TR


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 010
Instructor: Baybrook
Day/Time: 8:00-9:30 TR


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 011
Instructor: Baybrook
Day/Time: 9:40-11:10 TR


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 012
Instructor: Haynes
Day/Time: 9:40-11:10 TR


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 013
Instructor: Roth
Day/Time: 11:30-1:00 TR


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 014
Instructor: Dunckel
Day/Time: 11:30-12:30 MWF


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 015
Instructor: Ngaboh-Smart
Day/Time: 1:20-2:50 TR


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 191
Instructor: Henson
Day/Time: ONLINE


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 301
Instructor: Dunckel
Day/Time: 9:00-12:00 MTWRF (Interim)


Connect: Advanced Writing

Course Number: 300
Section: 302
Instructor: Aminashaun
Day/Time: 12:00-3:00 MTWRF (Interim)


Creative Writing: Fiction 1

Course Number: 303
Section: 001
Instructor: Rindo
Day/Time: 5:00-8:00 W


Honors: Advanced Composition

Course Number: 310
Section: 001
Instructor: Ochonicky
Day/Time: 11:30-1:00 TR


Honors: Advanced Composition

Course Number: 310
Section: 002
Instructor: Ochonicky
Day/Time: 1:20 – 2:50 TR


Advanced Writing

Course Number: 312
Section: 001
Instructor: Ngaboh-Smart
Day/Time: 9:40-11:10 TR


Advanced Writing

Course Number: 312
Section: 002
Instructor: Donath
Day/Time: 10:20-11:20 MWF


Advanced Writing

Course Number: 312
Section: 003
Instructor: Foss
Day/Time: 9:10-10:10 MWF


Advanced Writing

Course Number: 312
Section: 004
Instructor: Foss
Day/Time: 10:20-11:20 MWF


Advanced Writing

Course Number: 312
Section: 005
Instructor: Foss
Day/Time: 3:00 – 4:00 MWF


Advanced Writing

Course Number: 312
Section: 191
Instructor: Aminashaun
Day/Time: ONLINE


Advanced Writing

Course Number: 312
Section: 291
Instructor: Emmert
Day/Time: ONLINE


Theories of Rhetoric & Writing 

Course Number: 322
Section: 001
Instructor: Looker-Koenigs
Day/Time: 9:40-11:10 TR


Aurthurian Legend & Romance

Course Number: 340
Section: 001
Instructor: Boehler
Day/Time: 11:30-12:30 MWF


Medieval Literature (OC)

Dante’s Divine Comedy and the Cost of Human Freedom

In the Divine Comedy, Dante takes the reader on a poetic and philosophical journey through the afterlife, visiting Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise. Along the way, he offers up profound insights into human nature and the consequences of free will. A one time only opportunity to read Dante’s complete comedy.

Course Number: 351
Section: 001
Instructor: Pesta
Day/Time: 11:30-1:00 TR


Science Fiction

Course Number: 366
Section: 001
Instructor: Ochonicky
Day/Time: 6:00-9:00 W


Native American Literature

Course Number: 370
Section: 001
Instructor: Manning
Day/Time: 1:20-2:50 TR

I will tell you something about stories,

[he said]

They aren’t just entertainment.

Don’t be fooled.

They are all we have, you see,

all we have to fight off

illness and death.

You don’t have anything

if you don’t have stories.

(Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony)

The Indigenous literature we will read in this course explores the power and work of storytelling. Issues to be considered include: the relationship of an oral tradition to a written one, the intersections of the mythic and the mundane, finding a balance between tradition and modernity, literature as an act of resistance and recuperation, the interweaving of dreams and visions into narrative, identity and belonging, and the relationship of Indigenous literature to traditional Western narrative forms. 


Modern Drama

The purpose of this course is to gain an understanding and an appreciation of a number of major works by well-known modern and contemporary American and Continental playwrights. After focusing on the significance of these works within the framework of their respective periods and movements-realism, existentialism, naturalism, expressionism, absurdism – students will be tested on their knowledge of and insight into these works. These plays enable students to examine themselves, their place in history, and the world in which they live.

Course Number: 380 (OC)
Section: 001
Instructor: Feldman
Day/Time: 8:00-9:30 TR


Foundations of Literature

Course Number: 381
Section: 001
Instructor: Maguire
Day/Time: 3:30-5:00 MW


Grant Writing Foundations

Course Number: 388
Section: 001
Instructor: Mueller
Day/Time: 11:30-1:00 TR


Special Topics in Literature: Dystopian Visions in Fiction and Film (cross-listed with the Environmental Studies program)

This course examines dystopian novels and films spanning the 20th century and into the 21st—along with adjacent genres such as sci-fi and cli-fi (climate fiction)—with an aim to investigating precisely how the societies they depict fit into the category of dystopia. Recognizing that dystopian societies like those depicted in foundational dystopian narratives like Brave New World and Nineteen Eighty-Four were not in fact designed as such, but were rather intended by their rulers to be utopias, we will pay close attention to the points of difference and convergence between the two categories. In pursuing this emphasis, we will work to understand the fundamentally critical nature of the dystopian genre, and more specifically how dystopian texts exaggerate or solidify certain traits or tendencies latent in our present-day societies in order to highlight how fearfully proximate to dystopia we may now be. In particular, we will frequently return to the idea that one of the key indices of dystopian societies’ dystopian-ness is their unsustainability: in the societies depicted in the works we will study, the environmental base upon which social and economic activity is undertaken has been disastrously undermined, and the resonating consequences of this have made each society fundamentally inhospitable to human and other life in the long term. At its root, this course seeks to explore how portrayals of futures gone wrong can inform our present-day purview on the planetary crises we face.
 
Authors to be studied may include Aldous Huxley, George Orwell, Philip K. Dick, Ursula K. Le Guin, Margaret Atwood, Octavia E. Butler, Amitav Ghosh, Kazuo Ishiguro, Barbara Kingsolver, and Suzanne Collins. Films may include Metropolis, Brazil, The Matrix, Children of Men, and Okja.
 
Course Number: 392

Section: 001
Instructor: Cole
Day/Time: 11:30-12:30 MWF


Creative Writing (OC): Picture Books for Children

Course Number: 405
Section: 001
Instructor: Baker
Day/Time: 10:20-11:20 MWF


Applied Linguistics

Course Number: 452
Section: 001
Instructor: Hostetler
Day/Time: 5:00-8:00 T


Seminar to English Studies (OC)

Come spend a semester at sea . . . without ever leaving campus. In this section of English 481: Seminar in English Studies, we will devote the semester to studying Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick; or, The Whale (1851). Described as “the unavoidable centerpiece of the American tradition,” Moby-Dick permeates our culture. It has inspired everyone from graffiti artist Jean-Michel Basquiat and playwright Tony Kushner to Led Zeppelin and the founder of Starbucks. It is a book everyone, especially English majors, should read. We will explore Melville’s commentary on his own age—a time of westward expansion, violent clashes over slavery, and a looming civil war—as well as his novel’s relevance to our own—Moby-Dick has been used, for example, to frame analyses of the War on Terror, the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and opposition to the Affordable Care Act.

Along with Melville’s massive text, we will study a selection of key critical interpretations of Moby-Dick and even recent scientific findings concerning whale cultures, dialects, and brain functions. (Whales “fit the philosophical definition of personhood,” some researchers conclude.) Each student will produce either an analytical or a creative seminar project, a fifteen- to twenty-page work interpreting or inspired by Moby-Dick. Students will workshop their projects in class and will be encouraged to share resources with their classmates. This process will be facilitated by the fact that everyone will be working with the same novel; we all will be in the same boat. Close attention will be paid to writing and editing as students draft and revise their seminar projects. To this end, we will also read Line by Line: How to Edit Your Own Writing, another book all English majors should know.

Course Number: 481
Section: 001
Instructor: Dingledine
Day/Time: 3:30-6:30 M


Medieval Literature (OC)

Course Number: 551
Section: 001
Instructor: Pesta
Day/Time: 11:30-1:00 TR


Science Fiction (OC)

Course Number: 566
Section: 001
Instructor: Ochonicky
Day/Time: 6:00-9:00 W


Victorian Lit (OC)

The Victorian Child: From Pip to Harry Potter

What does it mean to say that a character like Harry Potter is a Dickensian orphan? Or that Lyra Belacqua from The Golden Compass is a Wonderland “dream child”? This course will study literature of the Victorian period (1837-1901)—the “Golden Age of children’s literature”—with an emphasis on how writers constructed and celebrated the iconic child figure that continues to play a principal role in some of our favorite stories today.

Assigned texts may include Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations; Lewis Carroll’s poetry and stories; Pre-Raphaelite paintings; poems by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Edward Lear, Christina Rossetti, and Alfred Tennyson; Rudyard Kipling’s short stories; Oscar Wilde’s fairy tales; J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan. We will end the semester by looking critically at J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone and/or Philip Pullman’s The Golden Compass.

Course Number: 569
Section: 001
Instructor: Roth
Day/Time: 1:20-2:50 TR


Creative Writing (OC)

Course Number: 605
Section: 001
Instructor: Baker
Day/Time: 10:20-11:20 MWF


Study Rhetoric & Writing (OC)

Course Number: 714
Section: 091
Instructor: Looker-Koenigs
Day/Time: ONLINE 

*This section is for CAPP adjuncts, NEW ERA adjuncts and Elmbrook teachers only. This course is outside of the plateau policy.


Study Rhetoric & Writing (OC)

Course Number: 714
Section: 092
Instructor: Looker-Koenigs
Day/Time: ONLINE 

*This section is for those in CESA 3. This course is outside of the plateau policy.


Study Rhetoric & Writing (OC)

Course Number: 714
Section: 093
Instructor: Looker-Koenigs
Day/Time: ONLINE 

*Additional fee of $150 for distance education. This course is outside of the plateau policy.

Contact Us 

Office: Radford Hall Room 216 
Phone: (920) 424-2205
Hours: 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Email: english@uwosh.edu