English Department Course Offerings

The English Department offers a variety of courses to meet major, degree, and USP requirements. Select a list on this page to learn which classes we are offering next semester to meet each set of requirements. This page also provides specific topic information not found in TitanWeb, like descriptions of Optional Content topics for English major courses and themes for WRT 188 courses.  

You may visit the Bulletin for full course descriptions and visit TitanWeb for the most up-to-date information about class days, times, instructors, and locations. For more information about the English Department’s programs, requirements, and other advising information, you may view the 2021-2022-English Major Handbook.

May and Summer 2022

May Term English and WRT Courses
ENG 204 Haynes
ENG  205 Manning
ENG 231 Bruni
WRT  287 Pesta
WRT 288 Sanders
Summer Major and Grad

English 392/592, Special Topics in Literature: Sports Literature and American Diversity
Prof. Scott Emmert, 1st 4-week Summer Session 2022 (6/13 – 7/8)
Fully online (asynchronous) 

 

ENG 392/592 Sports Literature and American Diversity examines America’s cultural, racial, and gender multiplicity in writing and film about sports and athletes. Through depictions of under-recognized aspects of American sports culture, the assigned works reflect a range of personal and communal experiences in a multicultural nation. Going far beyond stories of “winners” and “losers,” this literature uses sports as a lens to magnify complexities in American society and identity. This course considers how these works, varied in style and theme, make imaginative use of sports to define, communicate, and/or challenge cultural values and personal identities. Assigned reading includes works by August Wilson, Paul Beatty, Ben Fountain, and Carol Anshaw. This course can be used to satisfy the Area D requirement for all English majors or the Elective (Area E) area for English liberal arts majors. Curricular modifications can allow it to count for American literature instead upon request. English M.A. students are encouraged to enroll as well.
 
 
English 701, Seminar in Literature: Literary Theory and the Contemporary American Novel
Prof. Stephen McCabe, 2nd 4-week Summer Session 2022 (7/11 – 8/5)
Fully online (asynchronous)
 
This course provides a graduate-level interrogation of 20th and 21st Century literary theory as a lens to analyzing fiction, with an eye on developing classroom strategies for teaching use of literary theory and scholarship at the undergraduate level. We’ll read recent American fiction by Vladimir Nabokov, Toni Morrison, Junot Diaz, and others alongside corresponding literary theory and scholarship on pedagogy. This course is designed primarily for CAPP and other dual-enrollment instructors seeking HLC credentials.
 
English 708, Special Topics in English Studies: Race, Class, and Gender in the Long 18th Century
Prof. Ula Klein, 1st 4-week Summer Session 2022 (6/13 – 7/8)
Fully online (asynchronous)
 
The “woman’s question.” The slave trade & the abolitionist movement. The growth of empires and colonization. The Age of Reason, Revolutions, and Science…the 18th century is a fascinating time period. We will explore short, approachable texts from this time and consider how authors of the 1700s redefined and reconsidered the categories of race, class, and gender. This course is designed primarily for CAPP and other dual-enrollment instructors seeking HLC credentials.
Summer WRT and Explore Courses
WRT 287 8-weeks Donath
WRT 288 8-weeks Henson

Fall 2022

Liberal Arts Major

Core Courses

ENG 281 LOOKER-KOENIGS – Introduction to English Studies

ENG 381 COLE – Foundations of Literary Criticism

ENG 481 HAYNES – Poetry and Citizenship: This English capstone course will focus on the possibilities of poetry for addressing social, ecological, and political realities. We will investigate how contemporary American and European poets have interpreted their civic roles and how participating in public life can shape poets and their poetry. To focus our discussions, we will immerse ourselves in the works and lives of three of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries’ most prominent English-language poets: Irish Nobel Laureate Seamus Heaney (1939-2013), National Book Award-winner Adrienne Rich (1929-2012), and United States Poet Laureate W.S. Merwin (1927-2019). We will also create collaborative and individual projects that explore the public possibilities of poetry. 

Area A1 English Literary Tradition Before 1700

ENG 347  ROTH – Shakespeare I

Area A2 English Literary Tradition After 1700

ENG 364 MANNING – 19th Century English Novel :The 19th century is often described as the great age of the English novel, and it’s no wonder. The era that saw rapid social change as a result of the expansion of the British empire, the innovations of industry, and a flourishing of challenging scientific theories is vividly recorded, grappled with, and critiqued in its enduring works of fiction. The British novel in the 19th century registers revolutions of everyday life and thought as well as corresponding shifts in peoples’ understanding of race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, psychology, history, the environment, health and illness, power, earth and biological systems, etc. In order to explore these ideas, attitudes, and preoccupations, our reading practice will examine the formal, stylistic, and thematic aspects of texts by a wide array of authors whose works also embody certain key literary styles and genres of the period, including the Bildungsroman, the domestic novel, the realist novel, the gothic, the sensation novel, detective fiction, and horror. Overall, this course aims to deepen students’ understanding of the novel form through an examination of key texts from a watershed period in its development.

Area A3 American Literary Tradition

ENG 374 FELDMAN – American Romanticism

Area A4 Literature by America Ethnic Writers and/or Post-Colonial Writers

ENG 367 ANIMASHAUN  – African Literature (NW)

Area B Rhetoric/Linguistics

ENG 207 OCHONICKY – Introduction to Professional Writing

ENG 301 HOSTETLER – Modern Grammars

ENG 383 HOSTETLER – Introduction to English Linguistics

ENG 388 MUELLER – Grant Writing Foundations

Area C Creative Writing

ENG 204 ANIMASHAUN – Introduction to Creative Writing

ENG 405 MCCABE – Creative Writing: Poetics and Craft of Songwriting: A study of the craft of contemporary songwriting with an emphasis on lyrics, song structure, and creative collaboration. The course begins with an introduction to poetic prosody alongside a survey of songs spanning the past 60 years and analysis of their lyrical, structural, and melodic elements. Students then develop individual and collaborative musical and/or lyrical compositions to be workshopped. Musical proficiency not required.

Area D Specialized Literary or Cultural Studies

WGS/ENG 403 – KLEIN – Feminist Thought and Practice

 

 

 

Secondary Education Major

Core Courses

ENG 281 LOOKER-KOENIGS – Introduction to English Studies

ENG 381 COLE – Foundations of Literary Criticism

ENG 481 HAYNES – Poetry and Citizenship: This English capstone course will focus on the possibilities of poetry for addressing social, ecological, and political realities. We will investigate how contemporary American and European poets have interpreted their civic roles and how participating in public life can shape poets and their poetry. To focus our discussions, we will immerse ourselves in the works and lives of three of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries’ most prominent English-language poets: Irish Nobel Laureate Seamus Heaney (1939-2013), National Book Award-winner Adrienne Rich (1929-2012), and United States Poet Laureate W.S. Merwin (1927-2019). We will also create collaborative and individual projects that explore the public possibilities of poetry. 

Area A1 English Literary Tradition

ENG 364 MANNING – 19th Century English Novel : The 19th century is often described as the great age of the English novel, and it’s no wonder. The era that saw rapid social change as a result of the expansion of the British empire, the innovations of industry, and a flourishing of challenging scientific theories is vividly recorded, grappled with, and critiqued in its enduring works of fiction. The British novel in the 19th century registers revolutions of everyday life and thought as well as corresponding shifts in peoples’ understanding of race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, psychology, history, the environment, health and illness, power, earth and biological systems, etc. In order to explore these ideas, attitudes, and preoccupations, our reading practice will examine the formal, stylistic, and thematic aspects of texts by a wide array of authors whose works also embody certain key literary styles and genres of the period, including the Bildungsroman, the domestic novel, the realist novel, the gothic, the sensation novel, detective fiction, and horror. Overall, this course aims to deepen students’ understanding of the novel form through an examination of key texts from a watershed period in its development.

Area A2 American Literary Tradition

ENG 374 FELDMAN – American Romanticism

Area A3 Shakespeare

ENG 347  ROTH – Shakespeare I

Area A4 Literature by America Ethnic Writers and/or Post-Colonial Writers

ENG 367 ANIMASHAUN – African Literature (NW)

Area B Rhetoric/Linguistics

ENG 301 HOSTETLER – Modern Grammars

ENG 383 HOSTETLER – Introduction to English Linguistics

Area C Creative Writing

ENG 204 ANIMASHAUN – Introduction to Creative Writing

ENG 405 MCCABE – Creative Writing: Poetics and Craft of Songwriting: A study of the craft of contemporary songwriting with an emphasis on lyrics, song structure, and creative collaboration. The course begins with an introduction to poetic prosody alongside a survey of songs spanning the past 60 years and analysis of their lyrical, structural, and melodic elements. Students then develop individual and collaborative musical and/or lyrical compositions to be workshopped. Musical proficiency not required.

Area D Specialized Literary or Cultural Studies

WGS/ENG 403 – KLEIN – Feminist Thought and Practice

AREA E Young Adult Literature

ENG 223 ROTH – Young Adult Literature

Writing and Explore Courses

WRT 188 and Topic (Descriptions Coming Soon)

Section 001 VIELBIG – IK Sport: Gender & Race This course will concentrate on the importance of gender and race in sport. More specifically, students will explore gender identity in sport, masculinity in sport, media’s representation of male and female athletes, race and ethnicity as it relates to the evolution of particular sports, and the roles of racial and ethnic minorities play in sport.

Section 002 MCCABE -IK

Section 003 MCCABE – IK

Section 004 TBA – IK

Section 005 BOEHLER -IK

Section 006 BOEHLER- IK

Section 007 DUHATSCHEK – S

Section 008 BOEHLER – IK

Section 009 DONATH – CL “Debt and the America Dream.” WRT 188 is designed to develop your sense of writing as an ongoing process of invention, drafting and revising, along with developing skills in reading to analyze, interpret and generalize from a variety of texts. In order to make the process of critical interpretation meaningful, I have structured this course to investigate a central question: What is the American Dream?  Throughout the semester we will read articles and create response papers that identify this idea of the American dream and how socioeconomic factors influence a person’s definition of (and chance at) this dream.

Section 010 HENSON – CL “Remembering the Holocaust: Representing Genocide in Memoir, Literature, and Film.” How do we remember atrocities such as the Holocaust, Armenia, and Rwanda?  Is it possible to convey through documentaries,  memoirs, and literary texts and films those events that so dramatically exceed normal human experience?  Moreover, are some ways of remembering more authentic, more compelling, or more conducive to preventing future genocides than others?  We will examine these questions and more by reading a variety of textual materials (historical accounts, memoirs, and fictional narratives) and by viewing film representations (documentaries and feature films—fictional and non-fictional).

Section 011 SAGER – CL

Section 012 SAGER – CL

Section 013 BRUNI – CL

Section 014 DONATH – CL “Debt and the America Dream.” WRT 188 is designed to develop your sense of writing as an ongoing process of invention, drafting and revising, along with developing skills in reading to analyze, interpret and generalize from a variety of texts. In order to make the process of critical interpretation meaningful, I have structured this course to investigate a central question: What is the American Dream?  Throughout the semester we will read articles and create response papers that identify this idea of the American dream and how socioeconomic factors influence a person’s definition of (and chance at) this dream.

Section 015 TBA – CL

Section 016 WILLIAMSON-EMMERT – CL “The Future of the Planet is Now: Finding our Way in a Climate-Unstable World” In this class, we will look to film and fiction as we grapple with the effects of a changing climate on our societies, our values, and our lives.

Section 017 JAHNS – IK: “Monsters as a Study of What it Means to be Human.” Monsters function as reflections of self, society, history, and culture. Whether viewed as “other” or as “us,” monsters provide a focal point to examine the complexities of life itself. Develop a deeper perspective on the monsters of past and present, and of monsters yet to come.

Section 018 HENSON – CL “Remembering the Holocaust: Representing Genocide in Memoir, Literature, and Film.” How do we remember atrocities such as the Holocaust, Armenia, and Rwanda?  Is it possible to convey through documentaries,  memoirs, and literary texts and films those events that so dramatically exceed normal human experience?  Moreover, are some ways of remembering more authentic, more compelling, or more conducive to preventing future genocides than others?  We will examine these questions and more by reading a variety of textual materials (historical accounts, memoirs, and fictional narratives) and by viewing film representations (documentaries and feature films—fictional and non-fictional).

Section 019 JAHNS – IK

Section 020 SANDERS – S “Sustainable Technology” This course uses active and critical readings, collaborative discussions, and group work to develop ideas about technology and then write about them. Students will practice specific writing skills to help them produce college-level writing that engages critically and responsibly with ideas and source materials.

Section 021 WIRKUS – S: Black Markets and Forbidden Transactions. The American economist Alvin E. Roth states, “Markets work best if they enjoy social support, but some markets are repugnant in the sense that some people think they should be banned, even though others want to participate in them. Laws banning such markets often contribute to the design of illegal black markets.” Some examples of black markets and forbidden transactions include the illegal sale of narcotics, natural resources, or exotic and protected species, human trafficking, arms trafficking, undocumented labor, identify theft, and organ sales. Who decides what is and what is not for sale?

Section 022 SNYDER – S

Section 023 WIRKUS – S:Black Markets and Forbidden Transactions. The American economist Alvin E. Roth states, “Markets work best if they enjoy social support, but some markets are repugnant in the sense that some people think they should be banned, even though others want to participate in them. Laws banning such markets often contribute to the design of illegal black markets.” Some examples of black markets and forbidden transactions include the illegal sale of narcotics, natural resources, or exotic and protected species, human trafficking, arms trafficking, undocumented labor, identify theft, and organ sales. Who decides what is and what is not for sale?

Section 024 WIRKUS – S: Black Markets and Forbidden Transactions. The American economist Alvin E. Roth states, “Markets work best if they enjoy social support, but some markets are repugnant in the sense that some people think they should be banned, even though others want to participate in them. Laws banning such markets often contribute to the design of illegal black markets.” Some examples of black markets and forbidden transactions include the illegal sale of narcotics, natural resources, or exotic and protected species, human trafficking, arms trafficking, undocumented labor, identify theft, and organ sales. Who decides what is and what is not for sale?

Section 025 TBA – S

Section 026 DUHATSCHEK – S

Section 027 DUHATSCHEK – S

Section 028 SANDERS – S “Sustainable Technology” This course uses active and critical readings, collaborative discussions, and group work to develop ideas about technology and then write about them. Students will practice specific writing skills to help them produce college-level writing that engages critically and responsibly with ideas and source materials.

 

Quest Courses

ENG 151Q1 BOEHLER – S British Literature to the 18th Century

ENG 153Q1 RINDO – S American Literature Through Civil War

ENG 154Q1 MCCABE – CL American Literature After Civil War

ENG 168Q1 LANDRY – IK

ENG 211Q2 DUHATSCHEK – S

 

Explore: Culture XC

ENG 151Q1 BOEHLER – British Literature to the 18th Century

ENG 153Q1 RINDO – American Literature Through Civil War

ENG 154Q1 MCCABE – American Literature After Civil War

ENG 168Q1 LANDRY – Examining Multi-Ethnic American Literature

ENG 204 ANIMASHAUN – Introduction to Creative Writing

ENG 207 OCHONICKY – Introduction to Professional Writing

ENG 211Q2 DUHATSCHEK – British Literature I

ENG 212 DUNCKEL – British Literature II

ENG 214 BAYBROOK – American Literature II

ENG 218 ANIMASHAUN – Introduction to Multi-Ethnic Literatures

ENG 219 DONATH – African American Literature

ENG 220 MANNING – Native American Literature

ENG 224 TBA – Women in Literature

ENG 226 FELDMAN – Modern American Literature

ENG 226 DONATH – Modern American Literature

ENG 227 PESTA – Modern World Literature

ENG 228 FELDMAN- HONORS Modern American  Literature

ENG 229 DINGLEDINE – HONORS African American Literature

ENG 243 RINDO – Introduction to Nature Writing: A Global Perspective

ENG 243 HAYNES – Introduction to Nature Writing: A Global Perspective

ENG 283  TBA – The Political, Economic, and Cultural Power of Language

 

Explore: Ethnic Studies

ENG 168Q1 LANDRY – Examining Multi-Ethnic American Literature

ENG 218 ANIMASHAUN – Introduction to Multi-Ethnic Literatures

ENG 219 DONATH – African American Literature

ENG 220 MANNING – Native American Literature

ENG 229 DINGLEDINE – HONORS African American Literature

 

Explore: Global Citizenship

ENG 227 PESTA – Modern World Literature

ENG 243 RINDO – Introduction to Nature Writing: A Global Perspective

ENG 243 HAYNES – Introduction to Nature Writing: A Global Perspective

ENG 283  TBA – The Political, Economic, and Cultural Power of Language

Graduate Courses

** Italics Indicate Optional Content Courses. Descriptions Coming Soon.

ENG 547 ROTH – Shakespeare I

ENG 567 ANIMASHAUN – African Literature

ENG 583 HOSTETLER – Introduction to English Linguistics

ENG 605 MCCABE – Creative Writing

ENG 714 OCHONICKY – Seminar in Rhetoric and Writing

Contact Us

English Department
Office: Radford Hall Room 218
Phone: (920) 424-2205