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TERMS

AROMANTIC

A person who does not experience romantic attraction. Can fall anywhere on the sexuality spectrum from asexual to allosexual.

ASEXUAL

A person who does not experience sexual attraction. Some still have a sex drive; it just isn’t oriented towards different people. Some have romantic relationships, others don’t. Celibacy differs from this sexuality in that celibacy is a choice in a person makes not to have sex despite experiencing attraction. 

BISEXUAL

The first term used historically to indicate a nonmonosexuality and was originally defined as a person who has the capacity to form physical, romantic, emotional and/or spiritual bonds with men and women.  This term is currently defined as a person with the capacity to form such bonds with people of one’s own and other genders or with people of genders like one’s own and genders different than one’s own.

DEMISEXUAL

A person who experiences sexual attraction once a romantic and/or emotional connection is formed.

GAY

A man who is emotionally, physically, mentally, and/or spiritually oriented to bond and share affection with other men.  Some women choose to use this label for themselves when they are emotionally, physically, mentally, and/or spiritually oriented toward other women.  In the past this has been used to refer to the community in general, though this is out of favor now because it is exclusionary and most use LGBTQ+ community or queer community.

GREYSEXUAL

A person who experiences occasional and/or mild sexual attraction.  Their attraction is fluid.

HETEROSEXUAL

Sexual, emotional, and/or romantic attraction to a sex other than your own. Commonly thought of as “attraction to the opposite sex” but since there are not only two sexes (see intersex and transsexual), this definition is inaccurate.

LESBIAN

A woman who is emotionally, physically, mentally, and/or spiritually oriented to bond and share affection with other women.

OMNISEXUAL

An orientation defined as the sexual attraction to all genders, though gender often still plays a role in one’s attraction.

PANSEXUAL

A person who has the capacity to form physical, romantic, emotional and/or spiritual bonds with people of all genders or to people regardless of gender.

POLYAMORY

Refers to having consensual romantic, emotional, and/or sexual relationships with more than one partner at a time and can include: open relationships, polyfidelity (a relationship structure of 3 or more individuals who have no sexual or loving connections outside the group), and sub-relationships (which denote distinguishing between a “primary” relationship or relationships and various “secondary” relationships).

POLYSEXUAL

A person who has the capacity to form physical, romantic, emotional and/or spiritual bonds with people of many but not all genders.

QUEER

This word has been reclaimed by some members of the LGBTQ+ communities to refer to people who transgress culturally imposed norms of heteronormativity and the gender binary. It is also an umbrella term used to refer to the LGBTQ+ Community. This word may also connote a political identity as one who is committed to advocacy/activism for LGBTQ+ rights.

QUESTIONING

The process of considering one’s own sexual orientation or gender identity. Usually, an individual is considering an identity that is not heterosexual or not cisgender.

STRAIGHT

A person who is attracted to a gender other than their own.

TWO SPIRIT

This term was coined in 1990 at the third annual inter-tribal Native American/ First Nations gay and lesbian conference in Winnipeg. The term is inter-tribal (individual tribes also have their own terms and categories to understand gender and sexuality) and is used to create a more accurate understanding of Native LGBTQ+ identities given the rich history and spiritual and social significance found in Native communities. While some tribes and traditions still acknowledge these individuals as they once did, homo/bi/transphobia are also often present in modern Native communities. This label was created not only to define themselves within their cultural context (unlike identities such as those represented in LGBTQ+) but also to reclaim their traditions and combat contemporary issues affecting these individuals in their communities. This term is one that is used only by those who are both LGBTQ+ and Native.

Contact Us

LGBTQ+ Resource Center
717 W. Irving Ave.
(920) 424-3465