Master of Social Work

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   (920) 424-1419
  pasewalr@uwosh.edu
    Swart Hall 230

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The Master of Social Work is a strengths-based graduate program that prepares students for advanced professional practice and leadership in both local and global social work contexts, with a commitment to evidence-based knowledge, critical thinking, and a high value of social justice.

The curriculum offerings align with the Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS) of the Council on Social Work Education.

The vision of the Social Work Department reflects a central belief that its curriculum be guided by the principle of doing what is right and just. We teach students to willingly accept the professional responsibility to act as the “heart and conscience” of the profession, and to advocate on behalf of those who suffer discrimination and oppression. The Department’s mission and goals stem from this vision.

Graduates of the UW Oshkosh MSW program are competent professionals who will meet the social service practice needs of the Fox Valley and beyond.

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We are so glad you are considering becoming a part of the UWO MSW community. 

Applying for graduate school can be an anxiety-producing process. Part of that anxiety is not knowing when to expect an answer. Therefore, please take a look at the following timeline.  

Priority Deadline  January 14, 2022  

For the best chance of being considered for the UWO MSW Program, submit ALL application materials (including references) by January 14, 2022.  

Shortly after January 14, the MSW Admissions Committee will meet to review all completed applications. Candidates will be assessed for suitability for the UWO MSW program and ranked by strength of application. 

In late January 2022, decision letters will be emailed to the applicant’s preferred email address. This letter will offer either admission, denial, or wait list. Applicants who are offered a spot in the program will be asked to respond within three weeks with their decision. Admitted applicants who decline their spot or do not respond to their acceptance letter will forfeit their place in the UWO MSW program, and that spot will be offered to the next applicant on the wait list. This process takes time. Applicants can help expediate this process by providing an up-to-date, well-monitored preferred email address, and responding to communications from the UWO MSW program promptly. Those on the wait list can expect an updated admission status letter by mid-March 2022. 

Applications received after the priority deadline will be reviewed in mid-March 2022. If spots in the program remain at that point, the later applicants will be considered. Late applicants can expect a response of admission, denial, or waitlist via a letter to their preferred email address by mid-April 2022.    

The Program is particularly interested in applicants who want to develop expertise in the areas of advanced direct practice with a focus on sustainability and mental health care practice. Applicants should be comfortable with developing their expertise in working from a strengths-based perspective, with developing skills to work in both rural and metropolitan areas, and in working with clients from diverse cultures and circumstances.

The program cost is currently $550 per credit for Wisconsin residents with 68.57 per credit in student fees. Some courses may have additional fees assessed. Credit plateau is not applicable to MSW courses. MSW students taking courses in other departments (including, but not limited to: Nursing, Public Administration, Psychology), are subject to the tuition rates of those programs. 

Application Requirements
  • A cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.75, with 3.0 in the last 60 credits of study;
  • Have an academic background in the liberal arts and have completed a minimum of 18 credits in social sciences among courses in at least three of the following disciplines: psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, and political science (BSW students meet the criterion);
  • Submit personal essays which address the following (these are submit as part of the supplemental application; we recommend that you draft your responses in a word processing document):
    • Examples of how you apply social work values and principles
    • Explanation of how your skills, knowledge and abilities support a career in Social Work
    • Description of your career goals;
  • Three completed electronic reference questionnaires (including one academic reference, see supplemental MSW application);
  • Demonstrate relevant professional work/volunteer experiences (submit via the supplemental application):
    • Report number of hours of relevant work experience
    • Report number of hours of relevant volunteer experience;
  • Have completed course work in: Biological Life Sciences, Statistics, Research Methods, and Life Span Development or submit plans for completing this work prior to taking the Advanced Curriculum in the Program. Those with a BSW from an accredited program are considered to have met these criteria. At least two of these prerequisites must be completed before entering the program.
  • Advanced standing, applicants are required to have graduated from an accredited baccalaureate social work program within the last eight years or have successfully completed the Foundation Curriculum at a CSWE accredited MSW program.
  • Applicants who completed their degrees at foreign universities may be required to complete the TOEFL. For applicants who are Registered Aliens of the United States who have lived in the United States for more than one year or who have completed academic work in English, the TOEFL is not required. Registered Aliens who do not meet these criteria will enter the program on probation and give evidence of their English proficiency through satisfactory performance in their first-semester course work.
  • The GRE is not required.

Keeping with the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) Accreditation Standard 3.2.5 (EPAS 2008), the Program does not grant social work course credit for life experience or previous work experience.

Applicants are reminded that when submitting the supplemental application, please report work and volunteer hours in number form, even if an estimate.

 

Send official higher education transcripts to:

UW Oshkosh Office of Graduate Studies
800 Algoma Blvd
Dempsey Hall, Rm 337
Oshkosh, WI 54901-8621

 

 

Curriculum

The UW Oshkosh MSW Program offers two concentrations in the Advanced curriculum: clinical/mental health practice and advanced direct practice.

Advanced coursework is interdisciplinary and allows students to take relevant elective courses in public administration, nursing, as well as social work. Graduates are competent in the 9 CSWE competencies and have practice expertise specifically in mental health or health care practice.

MSW students in the Foundation curriculum become competent in the nine practice competencies mandated by the 2015 Council on Social Work Education-Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards. The Advanced curriculum will build on the nine CSWE practice competencies, which are measured by 23 advanced practice behaviors.

MSW Competencies

Graduates of the UWO Master of Social Work Program will be able to:

1: Display ethical and professional behavior

1.1 Demonstrate leadership and professionalism in social service practice settings.

1.2 Demonstrate initiative in professional growth and development.

1.3 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of interdisciplinary ethical practice within mental health and/or health care settings.

1.4 Successfully resolve ethical dilemmas encountered in mental health and/or physical health care settings.

1.5 Demonstrate professional, accurate and effective written and oral communication appropriate to the practice setting.

2: Engage diversity and difference in practice

2.1 Effectively employ social work knowledge and skills with diverse client systems, especially those who are vulnerable and oppressed.

2.2 Demonstrate cultural competency in all social work contexts.

3: Advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice

3.1 Identify and attend to resource gaps in relevant practice settings.

3.2 Demonstrate ability to work collaboratively with other professionals on behalf of client systems.

4: Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research

4.1 Demonstrate understanding and knowledge of qualitative and quantitative research methodologies and their application within the mental health/health care setting.

4.2 Critically evaluate practice interventions to determine if theory-based, best/evidence-based practices are being employed in the practice setting and suggest improvements when warranted.

5: Engage in policy practice

5.1 Actively engage in policy practice to improve client system outcomes for mental health/health care services.

5.2 Advocate for and on behalf of client systems.

6: Engage with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.

6.1 Demonstrate initiative and effective skills in engaging with client systems.

6.2 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the variety of technologies employed in mental health/health care practice, critically examine these in relation to social work values, and suggest improvements when warranted.

7: Assess individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.

7.1 Effectively, systematically, and collaboratively assess client system needs and professionally articulate/document these findings to clients and relevant co-workers.

7.2 Demonstrate knowledge, and skill in the application of a wide range of assessment and intervention models relevant to mental health/health care practice, including the Person in Environment and the DSM.

8: Intervene with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.

8.1 Effectively and collaboratively identify and employ best/evidence-based interventions to meet client system needs.

8.2 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a wide range of theoretical and practice frameworks relevant to mental health/health care settings, including ecological systems theories and the strengths perspective.

8.3 Effectively and collaboratively terminate client services when goals have been met.

9: Evaluate practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

9.1 Articulate and implement a vision for leadership regarding the promotion of best/evidence-based practice in mental health/health care policy.

9.2 Effectively and collaboratively evaluate client system outcomes and professionally articulate/document these findings with clients and relevant co-workers.

9.3 Demonstrate application of multiple methods of evaluation and assessment of service delivery.

 

Spring 2021 Schedule

 

Class Name Instructor Time Room
SW 702 – Generalist Practice I: Individuals, Families, and Small Groups (02/01/2021 – 03/19/2021) Dr. Jon Hudson Tues. 6:10-9:10 pm Swart Hall 217
SW 703 – Generalist Practice Lab: Interviewing (03/29/2021 – 05/14/2021) Dr. Jon Hudson Tu 6:10PM-8:10PM Swart Hall 217
SW 709 – Foundation Field and Seminar I (02/01/2021 – 06/04/2021) Dr. Amy Fischer Williams Tu 5:00PM-6:00PM Halsey 107
SW 723 – Advanced Practice Methods in Health Care (02/01/2021 – 05/14/2021) Carol Collien, MSW APSW We 6:10PM-9:10PM Swart Hall 217
SW 724 – PAdvanced Practice Methods in Mental Health Care (02/01/2021 – 05/14/2021) Dr. Mary Weeden We 6:10PM-9:10PM Online
SW 733 – Advanced Field and Seminar II (02/01/2021 – 06/04/2021) Dr. Mary Weeden (Mental Health) We 5:00PM-6:00PM Online
SW 733 – Advanced Field and Seminar II (02/01/2021 – 06/04/2021)

Dr. Jim Power    (Health Care)

We 5:00PM-6:00PM Online
SW 741 – Qualitative Research Methods (05/17/2021 – 06/04/2021) Dr. Jon Hudson We 6:10PM-9:10PM Online
SW 795 – Special Topics- Grant Writing (02/01/2021 – 05/14/2021) Dr. Matthew Ringenberg Th 5:00PM-8:00PM Swart Hall 217
Curriculum Full Time/Foundation (Full Program)

Courses marked with an asterisk* are hybrid courses; a portion of the course work is completed online.

Fall 1 Credits Spring 1 Credits
SW 701 – Ethical Foundations of Social Work Practice (First seven weeks)* 2 SW 702 – Generalist Practice I (First seven weeks) 3
SW 707 – Human Behavior & the Social Environment (Second seven weeks)* 3 SW 703 – Interviewing Lab (Second seven weeks) 2
SW 708 – Social Welfare Policy (J-Term)* 2

SW 709 – Field and Seminar I (17-weeks, 18 hours/week) +17 hours of seminar in the classroom

6

SW 720 – Practice Competence in a Diverse Community

2
Summer 1
SW 704 – Generalist Practice II 3

 

SW 710 – Field and Seminar II (8 weeks, 18 hours/week + 8 hours of seminar in the classroom)

4

 When students complete the Foundation Curriculum, they move on to the Advanced Curriculum

Curriculum Part Time/Foundation (Full Program)

Courses marked with an asterisk* are hybrid courses; a portion of the course work is completed online.

Fall 1 Credits Spring 1 Credits
SW 701 – Ethical Foundations of Social Work Practice (First seven weeks)* 2 SW 702 – Generalist Practice I (First seven weeks) 3
SW 707 – Human Behavior & the Social Environment (Second seven weeks)* 3 SW 703 – Interviewing Lab (Second seven weeks) 2
SW 708 – Social Welfare Policy (J-Term)* 2
Summer 1
SW 704 – Generalist Practice II 3

 

Fall 2 Credits

Spring 2

Credits

SW 720 – Practice Competence in a Diverse Community

2

SW 709 – Field and Seminar I (17-weeks, 18 hours/week) +17 hours of seminar in the classroom

6
Summer 2

 

SW 710 – Field and Seminar II (8 Weeks, 18 hours/week + 8 hours of seminar in the classroom) 4

 

 When students complete the Foundation Curriculum, they move on to the Advanced Curriculum

Curriculum Full Time/Advanced Standing
Advanced PT Clinical/MH Credits Advanced PT Health Care Credits
Fall 1
SW 728 – Advanced Policy Practice (J-Term)*

2

SW 728 – Advanced Policy Practice (J-Term)*

2

SW 729 – Field (17-weeks, 14.7 hours week + 17 hours of seminar in the classroom hrs/week)

5

SW 729 – Field (17-weeks, 14.7 hours week + 17 hours of seminar in the classroom hrs/week)

5

SW 731 – Program Evaluation, Practice Outcomes & Evidence-based Practice (14 weeks)* 2 SW 731 – Program Evaluation, Practice Outcomes & Evidence-based Practice (14 weeks)* 2

SW 727 – Psychopathology and Strengths –based Assessment (14 weeks)

3

SW 727 – Psychopathology and Strengths-based Assessment (14 weeks)

3

Spring 1
SW 733 – Field (17-weeks, 14.7 hrs/week +7 hours of seminar in the classroom)

5

SW 733 – Field (17-weeks, 14.7 hrs/week +7 hours of seminar in the classroom)

5

SW 724 – Advanced Practice Methods in Mental Health

3

SW 723 – Advanced Practice Methods in Health Care

3

SW 741 – (May Term): Qualitative Research Methods

2

2

 

Part time Advanced students complete the program in 2 years.

 

Curriculum Part-Time/Advanced Standing

 

Year 1 Fall Semester Year 2 Fall Semester
SW 731 – Program Evaluation, Practice Outcomes and Evidence-based Practice ( 14 weeks, 2 credits)* SW 729 – Advanced Field (Through J-Term, 5 credits)
SW 728 – Advanced Policy Practice ( J-Term 2 credits)*

SW 727 – Psychopathology and Strengths-based Assessment (14 weeks, 3 credits)

Year 1 Spring Semester Year 2 Spring Semester
SW 733 – Advanced Field (Through May Term, 5 Credits)
Advanced Practice Methods (SW 723/SW 724, 3 credits)
SW 741 – Qualitative Research Methods (May Term, 2 credits)

 

 

 

Advanced Curriculum Concentrations

Clinical & Mental Health Concentration

Clinical and mental health Social Workers assess, treat and prevent psychological, behavioral, emotional, social and environmental issues affecting patients of all ages in hopes to alleviate the major stresses that impact their daily life. This could include: helping employees within an organization with personal problems or workplace concerns, adjusting to life events, substance abuse treatment, and treatment of psychological disorders.

Examples of clinical and mental health care include:

  • Community mental health programs
  • Disaster relief programs
  • Employee assistance programs
  • Military and veteran services
  • Private practice
  • Hospital and skilled nursing facilities
  • Schools
  • Rehabilitation programs
  • Correctional programs

 

Health Care Concentration

Health care Social Workers provide individuals, families and groups with the psycho-social support needed to cope with chronic, acute or terminal illnesses. Services include advising family care givers, providing patient education and counseling, and making referrals for other services. They may also provide care and case management or interventions designed to promote health, prevent disease and address barriers to access to health care (from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics).

Health care Social Workers can find employment in many different types of institutions, including:

  • Hospitals
  • Nursing homes
  • Assisted living centers
  • Emergency clinics
  • Rehabilitation centers
  • Insurance Agencies
  • Government offices
Electives

Electives in the MSW Program should be selected thoughtfully based on each students’ learning goals and any requirements needed for future licensure or certification. Electives within the Department of Social Work (Social Work 795) always meet the elective requirement but not necessarily the clinical requirement (See below). Any course selected must be at the graduate level. If an undergraduate course is desired, it must be adapted for graduate students. Consult with your academic advisor if you are unsure about a course meeting the qualifications.

Mental Health-Clinical

Students who plan to eventually sit for the LCSW exam need to take at least one course beyond the required curriculum that meets one of the following criteria;

  •  (a) Case management, 
  • (b) Clinical assessment and treatment of specific populations and problems, such as children, adolescent, elderly, alcohol and drug abuse, family or couples relationships.,
  •  (c) Psychopharmacology, 
  • (d) Psychotherapeutic interventions,
  • (e) Electives such as family therapy, social work with groups, sex- or gender-related issues, and topics. 

 

Mental Health- Non-Clinical

 

Mental Health courses that do not qualify for the clinical requirement can focus on issues such as predictors of mental health, community education efforts, administration, or history of mental health. Other topics can meet this requirement as well.

 

Advanced Direct Practice

 

Advanced Direct Practice students are planning for a wide variety of vocational paths. Selecting an elective, either within the department or external to it, varies too much to provide a definitive list. Consult with your academic advisor to select an appropriate course. Outside of Social Work electives in Psychology, Sociology, Nursing, and Public Administration are common but not an exclusive list.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Field Studies

All students in the MSW program are required to complete field experience. A student’s field experience is one of the most vital aspects of their education, as it is where everything a student learns in the classroom is used to strengthen them as an advanced level practitioner.

MSW students have field placements at two different agencies, one during the Foundation year, and the second during the Advanced year.

The Foundation field placement is for 18 hours a week over the course of two semesters and helps students integrate their generalist practice skills.

The Advanced field placement is for 15 hours a week over the course of two semesters and helps students perform more effectively in their specialty (health care, mental health care).

Field placement planning is organized by the MSW Field Coordinator, who educates students about the field placement process, works with students to meet their professional interests, contacts and licenses field agencies, and helps students with issues and concerns that arise during the course of their placements. The Field Manual describes this process and field policies in greater detail.

MSW Field Coordinator

Carol Collien
(920) 424-0146
collien@uwosh.edu

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN OSHKOSH
Social Work Department

(920) 424-1419
pasewalr@uwosh.edu
Swart Hall, Room 230

(920) 424-1419
pasewalr@uwosh.edu
Swart Hall, Room 230