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Fall 2021 Course Offerings

PHIL 105: Ethics (XC)

“Analysis of the principal theories of ethics and their practical application to problems concerning the individual and society. Proposed methods of justifying moral principles will be examined. Students cannot receive credit for both PHIL 105 and PHIL 106 (the Honors version of the course)”

  • 001C: Evan Williams, MWF 9:10AM-10:10AM, Halsey 175
  • 002C: Evan Williams, MWF 10:20AM-11:20AM, Halsey 175

PHIL 105Q1: Ethics (XC)

Q1 Signature Question: Sustainability

“Analysis of the principal theories of ethics and their practical application to problems concerning the individual and society. Proposed methods of justifying moral principles will be examined. Students cannot receive credit for both PHIL 105 and PHIL 106 (the Honors version of the course)”

  • 001C: Sommer Hodson, MoWeFr 11:30AM–12:30PM, Halsey 268
  • 002C: Sommer Hodson, MoWeFr, 12:40PM-1:40PM, Halsey 268
  • 003C: Sommer Hodson, TuTh, 3:00PM-4:30PM, Nursing/Ed 221

PHIL 109: Introduction to Philosophy (XC)

A survey of some of the perennial problems of the human enterprise; the nature of reality, of truth, of knowledge, of beauty, of ideal political and social relationships, and of the good life; solutions to these problems offered by the best known Greek, medieval, and modern philosophers.

  • 001C: Larry Herzberg, MWF 12:40PM-1:40PM, Swart 217

PHIL 110: Honors: Introduction to Philosophy (XC)

An introduction to philosophical study of perennial problems of knowledge, truth, reality, value, religion, the fine arts, ideal social and political arrangements, and the good life. Solutions to these problems offered by some of the best known figures in the history of philosophy. Prerequisites: Enrolled in good standing with The Honors College with prior or concurrent enrollment in HNRS 175. Students cannot earn credit in both an honors course and a non-honors course of the same title.

  • 001C: Larry Herzberg, MoWeFr 1:50PM–2:50PM, Clow 240

PHIL 120Q1: Philosophy of Human Nature (XC)

Q1 Signature Question: Sustainability

A critical examination of different perspectives on human nature, human flourishing, and the relation between human beings and nonhuman life forms, the environment, and nature generally.

  • 001C: Robert Wagoner, TuTh 11:30AM–1:00PM, Swart 203

PHIL 207: Philosophy of Religion (XC)

A critical examination of such problems as the nature of religion, the existence of evil, the existence of God; the nature of religious knowledge, and the relation of reason to religious faith.

  • 001C: Larry Herzberg, TuTh 1:20PM–2:50PM, Halsey 456

PHIL 231: Biomedical Ethics

An examination of ethical issues in various aspects of the life sciences and public health care such as medicine, eugenics, birth control, behavior control, experiment and consent, health care delivery, death and dying, etc.

  • 001C: Evan Williams, TuTh 9:40AM-11:10AM, Swart 303

PHIL 301: History of Ancient Western Philosophy

Major ancient philosophers from the Ionians to St. Augustine. The relevance of their thought to contemporary philosophical problems. Prerequisite: One prior philosophy course, or Junior standing, or consent of instructor.

  • 001C: Robert Wagoner, MoWe 1:50PM–3:20PM, Sage 2234

PHIL 315: Philosophy of Science

The nature and function of science.  The scientific method and the growth of several important scientific theories. Philosophical issues involved in the basic concepts and procedures of science and the problems created by the growth of science.  Prerequisite: One prior philosophy course, or Junior standing, or consent of instructor.

  • 001C: Sommer Hodson, TuTh 11:30AM–1:00PM, Halsey 266

PHIL 350: Computing Ethics

This course focuses on ethical issues involved in computing in the age of the internet, including privacy, plagiarism, intellectual property rights, piracy, security, confidentiality and many other issues. We will use several moral theories to investigate these issues, and carefully analyze a professional code of ethics from a variety of perspectives. We will also discuss the logical structure of ethical arguments and positions, the quality and integrity of decisions and inferences based on data, and how important cases have shaped the legality, if not the morality, of computing in the age of the internet. Case studies will be used to further investigate these issues. Prerequisite: One prior philosophy course, or permission of the instructor.

  • 001C: Evan Williams, TuTh 8:00AM–9:30AM, Swart 303

PHIL 446: Independent Study

See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.

  • 001C: Staff

PHIL 475: Philosophy Capstone

In this course, with the aid of a Capstone advisor assigned by the Philosophy Department, you will develop important research skills by revising and expanding a paper that you have already written for a previous philosophy course. The skills to be developed include the ability to search philosophy databases for journal articles related to your topic; to select the most relevant of those articles based on their abstracts; to expand previously written work using the selected material; and finally to revise, edit, and polish your philosophical writing. The end result will be a 10-15 page research paper of a quality sufficient to provide the basis of a writing sample for graduate school applications. Prerequisites: At least 27 prior credits in Philosophy, or consent of instructor.

  • 001C: Robert Wagoner

PHIL 485: Applied Ethics Certificate Capstone

This 12-credit Applied Ethics Certificate program should appeal not only to philosophy majors and minors, but also to students in STEM and pre-professional programs whose future employers may well desire to hire students that have demonstrated a commitment to learning how ethical principles apply to various “real-world” scenarios.

  • 001C: Evan Williams

JANUARY 2022 COURSE OFFERING

PHIL 101: Elementary Logic

Analysis of reasoning, deductive and inductive, designed to aid the development of critical thinking. Examples illustrating the use of logical and illogical reasoning drawn from selected exercises and current literature.

  • 301C: Larry Herzberg, 100% Online

     

    Click the Links Below for UW-FOND DU LAC Campus and UW-FOX CITIES Campus Schedules

    UW-FOND DU LAC Campus Course Schedule  https://uwosh.edu/fdl/academics/courses/

    UW-FOX CITIES Campus Course Schedule  https://uwosh.edu/fox/academics/courses/

     

    Spring 2022 Course Offerings

    PHIL 105Q1: Ethics (XC)

    Q1 Signature Question: Sustainability

    “Analysis of the principal theories of ethics and their practical application to problems concerning the individual and society. Proposed methods of justifying moral principles will be examined. Students cannot receive credit for both PHIL 105 and PHIL 106 (the Honors version of the course)”

    • 001C: Sommer Hodson, MoWeFr 12:40PM–1:40PM, Kolf 159

    PHIL 105Q2: Ethics (XC)

    Q2 Signature Question: Sustainability

    “Analysis of the principal theories of ethics and their practical application to problems concerning the individual and society. Proposed methods of justifying moral principles will be examined. Students cannot receive credit for both PHIL 105 and PHIL 106 (the Honors version of the course)”

    • 001C: Evan Williams, MoWeFr 9:10-10:10, N. Polk 118
    • 002C: Larry Herzberg, MoWeFr 12:40-1:40, Halsey 175

    PHIL 105Q2: Ethics (XC)

    Q2 Signature Question: Civic Learning

    “Analysis of the principal theories of ethics and their practical application to problems concerning the individual and society. Proposed methods of justifying moral principles will be examined. Students cannot receive credit for both PHIL 105 and PHIL 106 (the Honors version of the course)”

    • 003C: Robert Wagoner, MoWeFr 1:50PM-2:50PM, Halsey 260

    PHIL 105Q2: Ethics (XC)

    Q2 Signature Question: Sustainability

    “Analysis of the principal theories of ethics and their practical application to problems concerning the individual and society. Proposed methods of justifying moral principles will be examined. Students cannot receive credit for both PHIL 105 and PHIL 106 (the Honors version of the course)”

    • 004C: Sommer Hodson, MoWeFr 1:50-2:50, N. Polk 118

    PHIL 206: Honors: Ethical Issues in a Diverse Society (XC)(ES)

    This Honors course examines a number of moral issues that are currently debated in our society. Among those examined are ones that arise from opposing views of social justice and from differences in cultural and racial perspectives. The role of various ethical theories in clarifying these controversial moral issues is studied. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Honors 175 and Honors College standing.

    • 001C: Laurence Carlin, MoWe 1:50PM–3:20PM, Swart 240

    PHIL 230: Environmental Ethics (XC)

    A survey of topics in environmental ethics. Topics may include: wilderness conservation, endangered species, hunting/agriculture, minerals/pollution, population, climate change, and others.

    • 001C: Evan Williams, TuTh 9:40AM-11:10AM, Swart 240

    PHIL 231: Biomedical Ethics (XC)

    An examination of ethical issues in various aspects of the life sciences and public health care such as medicine, eugenics, birth control, behavior control, experiment and consent, health care delivery, death and dying, etc.

    • 001C: Evan Williams, TuTh 8:00AM-9:30AM, Swart 240

    PHIL 320: Metaphysics

    An examination of fundamental ideas about what and how things exist, including possibility, causation, space, time , the mind-body relation, determinism, free will, personal identity, and so on. Prerequisite: One prior philosophy course, or Junior standing, or consent of instructor.

    • 001C: Sommer Hodson, TuTh 11:30AM-1:00PM, Halsey 202

    PHIL 322: Philosophy of Language

    A philosophical scrutiny of the nature and functions of language, theories of meaning, private languages, and linguistic relativity with emphasis on the writings of such influential linguistic philosophers as Wittgenstein, Ryle, Austin and others.  Prerequisite: One prior philosophy course, or Junior standing, or consent of instructor.

    • 001C: Larry Herzberg, MoWeFr 1:50PM-2:50PM, S. Polk 22

    PHIL 335: Philosophy of Sex

    An examination of recent philosophical views of human sexual desire and sexual activity. Questions to be addressed include: what makes a desire, activity, or pleasure sexual? How should we understand the distinction between “natural” and unnatural” sexual activities? What constitutes consent, and how does consent relate to the moral status of sexual activities? What is sexual objectification, and what should its moral status be? What are gender and sexual orientation, and in what ways, if any, are they related? In the end, should we be pessimistic or optimistic about human sexuality?

    • 001C: Larry Herzberg, TuTh 1:20PM–2:50PM, Sage 1235

    PHIL 446: Independent Study

    See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.

    • 001C: Staff

    PHIL 475: Philosophy Capstone

    In this course, with the aid of a Capstone advisor assigned by the Philosophy Department, you will develop important research skills by revising and expanding a paper that you have already written for a previous philosophy course. The skills to be developed include the ability to search philosophy databases for journal articles related to your topic; to select the most relevant of those articles based on their abstracts; to expand previously written work using the selected material; and finally to revise, edit, and polish your philosophical writing. The end result will be a 10-15 page research paper of a quality sufficient to provide the basis of a writing sample for graduate school applications. Prerequisites: At least 27 prior credits in Philosophy, or consent of instructor.

    • 001C: Robert Wagoner

    PHIL 485: Applied Ethics Certificate Capstone

    This 12-credit Applied Ethics Certificate program should appeal not only to philosophy majors and minors, but also to students in STEM and pre-professional programs whose future employers may well desire to hire students that have demonstrated a commitment to learning how ethical principles apply to various “real-world” scenarios.

    • 001C: Evan Williams

     

    SPRING 3 WK 2022 COURSE OFFERING

    PHIL 106: Honors Ethics

    This Honors course examines a number of moral issues that are currently debated in our society. Among those examined are ones that arise from opposing views of social justice and from differences in cultural and racial perspectives. The role of various ethical theories in clarifying these controversial moral issues is studied. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Honors 175 and Honors College standing.

  • 371C: Larry Carlin, Study Abroad
  • 372C: Larry Carlin, Study Abroad

    Click the Links Below for UW-FOND DU LAC Campus and UW-FOX CITIES Campus Schedules

    UW-FOND DU LAC Campus Course Schedule  https://uwosh.edu/fdl/academics/courses/

    UW-FOX CITIES Campus Course Schedule  https://uwosh.edu/fox/academics/courses/