Contact Us
Department of Biology
142 Halsey Science Center
800 Algoma Blvd.
Oshkosh, WI 54901
(920) 424-1102
biology@uwosh.edu

Course Descriptions


Biology 61 RT Continuing Registration (0 credits)

This course serves as a placeholder (in lieu of full or part-time registration) for Radiologic Science majors who have completed all required University-based courses for the Associate’s and Bachelor’s degree by the end of the Fall semester prior to their beginning study at hospital-based school of radiography. Enrollment in this course provides continuing registration, substitutes for a Spring Leave of Absence, and avoids re-application when the hospital program is begun the very next Fall. Pass/Fail Spring only. May not be repeated.

Biology 104 Ecosphere in Crisis (NS)(XL) (4 credits)

Treats humans as biological organisms that interact with the living and nonliving world.  Emphasis is given to how humans affect, and are affected by, their environment.  Topics covered include basic ecology, global change, renewable and nonrenewable energy sources, air and water quality, and biological diversity.  Special course fees will be charged to cover the cost of transportation during local field trips. Special fees may apply. (3+3)

Biology 105 Biological Concepts - Unity (NS)(XL) (4 credits)

An introduction to the biological sciences. Addresses phenomena common to a diversity of life forms. Biological organization, cell biology, processing energy, genetics, evolution. (3+2) Special fees may apply.

Biology 106 Biological Concepts - Diversity (NS)(XL) (4 credits)

A non-majors course examining the diversity of life on Earth, including bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals.  A central theme in the class is evolution as a process driving diversity.  Emphasis is placed on how these organisms impact humans, and the role of humans in the ecosystem.  A section on human biology is included.  Laboratory exercises involve observation of specimens to illustrate in this diversity. (3+2) Special fees may apply.

Biology 108 Honors: Concepts in Biology - Unity (NS)(XL) (5 credits)

An introduction to molecular, cellular and ecological aspects of biology, and how they relate to current societal issues.  Emphasis on scientific method, fundamental cellular processes, and formation and maintenance of biological populations. This course is designed for students who have had experience in biology and chemistry in high school.  Majors and non-majors welcome.  Prerequisites: Enrolled in good standing with the UW Oshkosh Honors program with prior or concurrent enrollment in HNRS 175.  Students cannot earn credit in both an honors course and a non-honors course of the same title. Special fees may apply. (3+1+3)

Biology 113 Environmental Health Orientation (3 credits)

This is an introductory course to the field of Environmental Health that addresses foundation areas of this science. The topics addressed in this course are to expand the students’ understanding of aspects of risk (e.g. assessment, communication, analysis and management) through introductions to air quality, food protection, occupational health, vectorborne disease, and water quality. This course also will examine current topics relevant to environmental health, employment opportunities, and the roles and responsibilities of environmental health professionals (Registered Sanitarians) in society. Students are encouraged to take this course as early as possible in their academic programs. Students with 90 or more credits must obtain department consent to enroll.

Biology 117 The Right and Wrong of Healthcare Science (XS)(SS) (3 credits)

The average American trusts that ethical scientific reasoning is faithfully applied during the cradle-to-grave, life -or-death decision making of health care. Yet critics complain that “bad science” (BS) all too often betrays that trust, wasting money and risking lives. It takes years for doctors to learn their craft, so what can the average American possibly do? A lot, as it turns out. This class helps you develop your own critical thinking “BS meter” by examining claims about dietary supplements, alternative medicine, prescription drugs, and more. These claims affect communities ranging from doctor and patient, to surgical team, to global modern medicine; so you’ll learn to take multiple perspectives on a problem. You’ll gain experience recognizing good ideas, and coming up with your own. Just enough biology will be taught for understanding arguments and evidence. By acquiring civic knowledge that applies to healthcare, you’ll better understand how to ethically pursue a better quality of life in your community.

Biology 211 Human Anatomy (NS)(XL) (4 credits)

A study of the fundamental structure and organization of the organs and systems of the human body. (2+2) Special fees may apply.

Biology 212 Human Physiology (NS)(XL) (4 credits)

Structure/function relationships of the healthy human body, on the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ-system levels. (3+2) Special fees may apply.

Biology 230 Biology of Animals (NS)(XL) (4 credits)

An introductory, phylogenetic study of the Animal Kingdom considering anatomy, evolution and life histories of major groups. (3+3) Special fees may apply.

Biology 231 Biology of Plants and Microbes (NS)(XL) (4 credits)

The biology of plants, fungi, and microorganisms traditionally studied by botanists, with an emphasis on plants. Topics to be covered include taxonomy, evolution, ecology, physiology, and life history traits. The impact of these organisms on human affairs will be stressed. (2+4) Special fees may apply.

Biology 233 Microbial Survey (NS)(XL) (1-4 credits)

A survey of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, and some algae, fungi, and invertebrates. Emphasis will be placed upon the health care applications of microbiology and transmission of infectious disease agents. Laboratory will focus on standard microbiologic techniques used in the allied health fields. This course is designed for those students interested in allied health fields, including biology, nursing and medical technology majors. (3+2) Special fees may apply.

Biology 250 Medical Mycology (NS) (2 credits)

The laboratory identification of fungal human pathogens. (Primarily for medical technologists.) (1+2) Special fees may apply.

Biology 260 Environment and Living Systems (3 credits)

A study of environmental issues from a biological perspective, focusing on the scientific bases for: 1) physical, chemical, and biological influences on living organisms; 2) contacts between natural and perturbed ecosystems; and 3) historical, current, and predicted effects of human activities on local, regional and global scales. Credit cannot be received for both Biology 260 and Environmental Studies 260.

Biology 300 Internship in Biology (1-6 credits)

An internship experience with a cooperating organization or corporation to gain on-the-job learning. Internships may be arranged at any time, but most that provide salary are available only in summer. Prerequisite: Student must arrange for a specific internship with the Internship Director before registering for the course. May be taken more than once for credit for up to a total of six credits. A maximum of six credits from Biology 300 and/or 301 can be counted towards a degree in Biology or Microbiology.

Biology 301 Internship in Microbiology (1-6 credits)

An internship experience with a cooperating organization or corporation to gain on-the-job learning. Internship may be arranged at any time, but most that provide salary are available only in summer. Prerequisite: Student must arrange for a specific internship with the Internship director before registering for the course. May be taken more than once for credit for up to a total of six credits. No more than six credits from Biology 300 and/or 301 can be counted towards a degree in Biology or Microbiology.

Biology 302 Internship in Environmental Health (1-3 credits)

An internship experience with a cooperative organization or corporation to gain on-the-job learning. Internships may be arranged at any time, but most that provide salary are available only in summer. The student will work with cooperating agencies such as regional or state health departments, federal agencies, or private enterprises. Prerequisites: Students must arrange for a specific internship with the Internship Director or EH Coordinator before registering for the course.

Biology 303 Introduction to Epidemiology (2 credits)

This course will investigate the study of epidemiology as it relates to the practice of public health. This course covers application of epidemiologic procedures to the understanding of the occurrence and control of conditions such as infections and chronic diseases, mental disorders, community and environmental health hazards, accidents and geriatric problems. (3+0)

Biology 304 Plant Taxonomy (NS) (3 credits)

Introduction to the theory and principles underlying systematic botany, and to the methodologies of plant classification and nomenclature. Survey of major families of flowering plants emphasizing structure and diversity.  Special fees may apply. (2+2)

Biology 306 Neurobiology (3 credits)

Study of the nervous system and its regulatory role in the body.  Underlying physics and chemistry; molecular and cellular principles; development and plasticity; motor control; rhythms and emotions; evolution and diversity.

Biology 308 Comparative Anatomy (NS) (5 credits)

A comparative study of representative vertebrates.  Special fees may apply.

Biology 309 Bacteriology (NS) (5 credits)

The course covers basic concepts of microbiology, through chemical and physiological properties, genetics, evolution, and diseases caused by microbes and the microbial activities beneficial to human. Laboratory covers standard microbiological experiments and isolation and identification of bacteria. (3+4) Special fees may apply.

Biology 310 Biology of Gender (3 credits)

Evolution, genetics, development, anatomy, and physiology of gender in humans and other animals. Gender diversity including intersex and transgender. Roles of gender in reproductive and social behavior. Using biology in evidence-based critical thinking about related sociopolitical issues such as endocrine disruptors, defining deviancy, gender-based medicine, and sexual reassignment of infants and adults. Cross-listed: Biology 310/Women’s and Gender Studies 310. Students may receive credit for only one of the cross-listed courses.

Biology 311 Animal Behavior (3 credits)

An introduction to the behavior mechanisms of invertebrate and vertebrate animals emphasizing a naturalistic point of view. (2+2)

Biology 312 Medical Bacteriology (Lecture) (2 credits)

Bacterial pathogens and their relationships to diseases; prevention and control of infectious diseases. (2+0)

Biology 313 Medical Bacteriology (Laboratory) (NS) (2 credits)

Isolation study, identification and laboratory handling of pathogenic bacteria. (0+2) Special fees may apply.

Biology 314 Principles of Wildlife Management (3 credits)

This course is designed to help students bridge the gap between academic experience and advances into the wildlife profession. The course will apply population and community ecology to the management and conservation of wild populations. Cross-listed: Environmental Studies 314/Biology 314. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Special fees may apply.

Biology 315 Virology (3 credits)

Principles of animal and human molecular virology. Topics include replication, expression, pathogenesis, methods of diagnosis and detection, current uses of viruses in gene therapy and vaccine applications, viruses and cancer and other diseases, persistent infections, and emerging viruses.  (3+0)

Biology 316 Developmental Biology (3 credits)

Developmental Biology will first examine, at a morphological level, different strategies of embryonic development in diverse organisms, and then study molecular cues that cells use to migrate, differentiate and eventually form a normal organism. (3+0)

Biology 318 Wildlife Behavior and Conservation (3 credits)

This course is designed to teach the fundamental theory of behavioral ecology and then apply that theory to wildlife conservation. We will examine how environments shape organisms’ lives and what that means for our efforts to manage and conserve species. The specific course objectives are to 1) gain a rigorous biological foundation in behavioral ecology, evolutionary biology, and related topics in order to understand how environments shape behavior; 2) provide a forum for discussion of current issues in conservation biology; 3) develop a framework for applying behavior ecological theory to wildlife conservation. Cross-listed: Biology 318/Environmental Studies 318. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. (3+0)

Biology 319 General Animal Physiology (NS) (5 credits)

Structure/function relationships common to a variety of animal body plans on the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ-system levels. (3+1+3) Special fees may apply.

Biology 321 Mycology (NS) (3 credits)

A study of the fungi: characteristics, physiology, habits and laboratory identification of molds, yeasts, mushrooms and related organisms. Special fees may apply. (2+2)

Biology 322 Mushroom Identification (1 credit)

The collection and identification of mushrooms and other fleshy fungi.

Biology 323 Molecular and Cell Biology (3 credits)

This course covers the fundamental elements of molecular and cellular biology, including some current research techniques. Molecular biology covers structure, function and biosynthesis of DNA, RNA and proteins as well as regulation of gene expression. Cell biology examines cellular structures and how they accomplish replication, metabolism and response to the environment. (3+0)

Biology 325 Field Ecology (NS) (3 credits)

An introductory field ecology course that will cover comparative, experimental and theoretical approaches to basic and applied questions in ecology. Field and laboratory exercises will treat various levels of organization including populations, communities and ecosystems. Studies will be carried out in a variety of local aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Students will gain firsthand experience with modern sampling and analytical techniques in ecology. Special fees may apply. (0+1+3)

Biology 326 Introductory Limnology (NS) (3 credits)

The physical, chemical and biological character of lakes and streams. Methods of field measurements, collection and analysis of water samples. Investigation of aquatic communities. Special fees may apply. (2+2)

Biology 327 Microbial Ecology & Diversity (3 credits)

A broad overview of the physiological, phylogenetic and genomic diversity and ecology of microorganisms within a framework of general ecological principles. Focuses on evolutionary pressures leading to microbial diversity, biogeochemical cycles, symbiotic relationship, microbial relationships with other living organisms, metabolic pathways, and biotransformation of novel compounds. (3+0)

Biology 328 Ornithology (NS) (3 credits)

An introduction to the systematic, evolution, anatomy, behavior, and ecology of birds of the world. Field Trips.  (2+3)

Biology 330 Ichthyology (NS) (3 credits)

The biology of fishes including functional anatomy, evolution, taxonomy, ecology, physiology, behavior and development. Field trips required. (2+3)

Biology 332 Entomology (NS) (3 credits)

An introduction to the study of insects. Principles of biology, ecology and classification are emphasized.  Elements of morphology, physiology, and collection and preservation techniques are included. Field trips. General collection of insects (assembled during the term) is required. (2+3) Special fees may apply.

Biology 333 Teaching Science I: Using the Nature of Science in the Classroom (3 credits)

A study of the principles of taxonomy, nomenclature, classification and systematics incorporating the most recent approaches to derivation and application of hierarchical classification systems. Quantitative methods, their underlying assumptions, and their logical outcomes will be stressed. (2+2)

Biology 336 Fresh Water Algae (NS) (3 credits)

Classification, biochemistry, physiology and ecology of fresh water algae. Emphasis on the roles algae play in aquatic ecosystems and on applications in environmental monitoring, aquaculture, and as experimental systems for basic research in photosynthesis. (2+2)

Biology 337 Plant Anatomy (NS) (3 credits)

Structural aspects of cells, tissues, and organs comprising the plant body, their functional role in the ecology and life history of the plant, and their relationship to human affairs. Special fees may apply.

Biology 338 Environmental Toxicology (2 credits)

Provides studies with an appreciation and understanding of the principles of environmental toxicology and chemistry including the sources, fate, and effects of chemicals in the environment. Emphasis is on contemporary problems in human health and the environment.

Biology 339 Public Health and Food Microbiology (NS) (3 credits)

A study of microorganisms and microbial processes important to a variety of public health applications: special reference to food, water, wastewater, and environmental processes and their applications. (3+0) Special fees may apply.

Biology 341 Immunology (3 credits)

Principles of immunology, with emphasis on the cellular and molecular basis of immune function, including clinical aspects of host immune processes. Areas of immunology currently under investigation will also be examined.  (3+0)

Biology 343 Introduction to Hematology (3 credits)

An introduction to the basic techniques used in the chemical and microscopic examination of blood. Morphology of blood cells is emphasized. (Primarily for Medical Technologists) As a part of this course, students will be instructed in universal precautions for handling blood and body fluids consistent with U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.  (2+2) Special fees may apply.

Biology 345 Plant Physiology (NS) (5 credits)

An experimental study of plant growth, metabolism, nutrition, reproduction and response to environment. (3+4)

Biology 349 Ecology and Evolution (3 credits)

Basic principles which influence and govern the plant and animal relations with their environments. An explanation of the distribution, abundance, and specialization of the present-day organisms, and of extinction. (3+0)

Biology 350 Electron Microscopy (NS) (4 credits)

Electron Microscopy is an intensive, hands-on course covering the practices, procedures and operational theories of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Topics covered include specimen preparation, ultramicrotomy, microscope design and microscope function. The laboratory provides experience with all techniques necessary to prepare, observe, and photograph biological specimens on the SEM and TEM. Special fees may apply. (1+3)

Biology 351 Parasitology (NS) (3 credits)

A look at the most common mode of life on earth.  Emphasis will be placed on parasites of medical and veterinary importance.  Topics will include life histories, identification and diagnosis, parasitic diseases, host-parasite interactions and parasite evolution. (2+2) Special fees may apply.

Biology 355 Field Parasitology (3 credits)

Field Parasitology (Biology 355) is an intensive 2-week course taught at the Pigeon Lake Field Station during mid to late summer. In this course we will study parasite population and community structure, life cycles, and taxonomy. The course is designed to provide students with a broad exposure to the methods of collection, preservation and identification of parasites; data collection and analysis, and presentation of results as well as the ecology of infectious organisms. Each student will do an independent research project, and compile and present their findings during an in-class scientific program. This course emphasizes invertebrate zoology and involves fieldwork, lecture, specimen labs and readings.

Biology 358 Freshwater Invertebrates (2 credits)

In this course benthic organisms and zooplankton will be studied. Sampling techniques for different situations will be used. Data will be analyzed using several diverse techniques. The role of benthos and zooplankton in aquatic systems will be examined. (0+4)

Biology 360 Special Topics in Biology (1-3 credits)

A biology course on a topic not covered in the department’s curriculum. This course may be repeated with different content. Each time it is offered, the topic will be announced in the class schedule.

Biology 367 Field Ornithology (2 credits)

Field-oriented course intended to provide the practical “hands-on” experience essential to students interested in field biology. Field studies will emphasize identification and natural history of local avian species using a variety of field techniques. In addition to fieldwork, the course will involve lecture, specimen labs, and readings to examine important aspects of systematics, anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology, and conservation as they apply to birds. Special fees may apply.

Biology 372 Medical and Environmental Applications of Cell Biology and Genetics (3 credits)

Theme-based course that discusses the principles and techniques of cell biology and genetics and how they apply to a variety of medical issues as well as other societal topics such as the molecular basis of drug addiction, cancer, aging and long term memory as well as the application of molecular techniques to species conservation, evolution and environmental influences on humans and other species. Papers from the literature will be read. (3+0)

Biology 373 Biology Field Trip (2 credits)

Formal library and classroom study of an area of interest followed by field study of that area. Site of study will change from year to year and could include Florida Everglades and Keys, Gulf Coast, Desert Southwest, etc. A final examination will follow the trip. See instructor for special course fees. May be taken more than once for credit but only two (2) units (crs.) will apply toward the major or minor at the undergraduate level or MS Biology degree. To receive credit, student must be enrolled at beginning of term.

Biology 374 Cell/Immunology Laboratory (NS) (3 credits)

Laboratory course integrating principles of cell biology and immunology. Techniques employed include, but are not limited to western blotting, SDS-PAGE, PCR and applications, ELISAs, tissue culture, and microscopy. Course is designed for students interested in molecular methods and who aim to do research or gain jobs in fields of cell and molecular biology, microbiology, medicine and medical technology.  Special fees may apply. (0+4)

Biology 375 Microbial Genetics (3 credits)

Structure of microbial genome, mutation, expression and exchange of genetic information, genetic analysis, genetic engineering. (3+0)

Biology 376 Population and Community Ecology (NS) (3 credits)

An introduction to the study of populations and communities. Examines population-level phenomena (e.g., density, demography, reproduction) and population-level interactions within biological communities (e.g., competition, predation, parasitism). Labs involve discussions of papers from the literature, data analysis, and computer simulations. Special fees may apply. (2+3)

Biology 377 Microbial Genetics Laboratory (NS) (2 credits)

A laboratory course to study the genetics of bacteria and their viruses. Genetic mapping will be introduced using techniques involving mutagenesis, recombination, plasmid transfer, transduction and transformation systems. Special fees may apply. (0+4)

Biology 386 Ecosystems Ecology (NS) (3 credits)

An introduction to the study of ecosystems with an emphasis on biogeochemical cycles, energy budgets, and other emergent properties.  Laboratory will focus on comparative and experimental approaches to the study of local ecosystems (streams, lakes, wetlands, forests). Students will acquire hands-on experience with techniques used by ecosystem ecologists such as nutrient analysis of streamwater, determination of ecosystem metabolism, and analysis of forest and wetland soils.  Special fees may apply. (2+2)

Biology 389 Principles of Biotechnology (3 credits)

A survey of methods and processes used in industrial microbiology and the techniques used in the development of new processes (recombinant DNA, monoclonal antibodies and genetic improvement).  (3+0)

Biology 390 Biotechnology Laboratory (NS) (2 credits)

A laboratory course that complements the lecture course Biology and Microbiology 389/589 in biotechnology. Students will gain hands-on experience in some of the principles of cell culture, product isolation and purification, and molecular genetic manipulation of genes that are basic to many areas of this broad and rapidly changing field. Exercises are planned in cell culture, computer analysis of cell culture parameters, protein isolation and purification, gene cloning and nucleic acid probe techniques, DNA sequencing, and computer analysis of DNA and protein sequences. If taken at the undergraduate level, the course may not be repeated for graduate credit. (0+4) Special fees may apply.

Biology 404 RT Block I (12 credits)

This RT Block Course is the first in a series for students who have completed the requisite in-residence Radiologic Science major course work at UW Oshkosh and have been accepted into a JRCERT- accredited School of Radiology/Radiography/Radiologic Technology. It consists of course work in Introduction to Radiography, Anatomy & Physiology, Radiographic Positioning, Radiographic Principles, Patient Care and Clinical Education. Prerequisites: Completion of the UW Oshkosh “in residence portion” of the UW Oshkosh Radiologic Technology major and admission into a JRCERT-accredited School of Radiology/Radiography/Radiologic Technology, and permission of instructor.

Biology 405 RT Block II (14 credits)

This RT Block Course is the second in a series for students who have completed the requisite in-residence Radiologic Science major course work at UW Oshkosh, have been accepted into a JRCERT-accredited School of Radiology/RadiographyRadiologic Technology, and have successfully completed RT Block I. It consists of course work in Anatomy & Physiology, Radiographic Positioning, Radiographic Principles, Radiographic Physics, Film Critique, Patient Care and Clinical Education. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology 404.

Biology 406 RT Block III (4 credits)

This RT Block Course is the third in a series for students who have completed the requisite in-residence Radiologic Science major course work at UW Oshkosh, have been accepted into a JRCERT-accredited School of Radiology/RadiographyRadiologic Technology, and have successfully completed Biology 405.  It consists of course work in Anatomy & Physiology, Radiographic Positioning, Radiographic Principles, Film Critique, Patient Care and Clinical Education. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology 405.

Biology 407 RT Block IV (12 credits)

This RT Block Course is the fourth in a series for students who have completed the requisite in-residence Radiologic science major course work at UW Oshkosh, have been accepted into a JRCERT-accredited School of Radiology/Radiography/Radiologic Technology, and successfully completed Biology 406. It consists of course work in Anatomy & Physiology, Radiographic Positioning, Radiation Protection, Film Critique, Patient Care and Clinical Education. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology 406.

Biology 408 RT Block V (14 credits)

This RT Block Course is the fifth in a series for students who have completed the requisite in-residence Radiologic Science major course work at UW Oshkosh, have been accepted into a JRCERT-accredited School of Radiology/Radiography/Radiologic Technology, and have successfully completed Biology 407. It consists of course work in Imaging Equipment, Anatomy & Physiology, Radiographic Positioning, Radiation Biology, Pathology, Film Critique and Clinical Education. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology 407.

Biology 409 RT Block VI (4 credits)

This TR Block Course is the sixth in a series for students who have completed the requisite in-residence Radiologic Science major course work at UW Oshkosh, have been accepted into a JRCERT-accredited School of Radiology/Radiography/Radiologic Technology, and have successfully completed Biology 408. It consists of course work in Anatomy & Physiology, Radiographic Positioning, Radiographic Principles, Film Critique, Patient Care and Clinical Education. Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Biology 408.

Biology 410 RT Registry Exam Completion (0 credits)

This RT Block Course is the culminating experience for students in the Radiologic Science major. It consists of taking the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) Registry Exam which is required for licensure to practice in Wisconsin and most other states. A passing grade on the Registry exam is 75% or greater. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology 409.

Biology 445 Topics in Environmental Health (1-3 credits)

This course will investigate and discuss in detail contemporary issues in environmental public health. Subject material and faculty will rotate. Course may be repeated for a total of 6 credits, although only three credits will count towards the Environmental Health Major, and the same topic may not be repeated. Topics include, but are not limited to Environmental Analytical Methods, Emerging Diseases, Environmental Law or Policy, Inspection of Food Establishments, Recreational Environmental Health, Water Resource Evaluation, etc.

Biology 446 Independent Study (1-3 credits)

See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies Information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements May be taken more than once for credit. A maximum of six credits from Biology 446 and/or Biology 456 can be counted towards a degree in Biology or Microbiology.

Biology 450 Microbial Physiology (NS) (5 credits)

Physiological and metabolic processes of bacteria with emphasis on growth, nutrition, synthesis of cellular constituents and energy yielding processes. Special fees may apply. (3+4)

Biology 456 Related Readings (1-3 credits)

See Related Readings under Course and Academic Advisement Policies Information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements. A maximum of six credits from Biology 446 and/or Biology 456 can be counted towards a degree in Biology or Microbiology.

Biology 474 Honors Thesis (1-6 credits)

Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student’s major field of study Proposals (attached to Independent Study Contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be “Honors Thesis.” Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty. Prerequisite: University Honors program and junior standing. Maximum of 6 units (crs.)

Biology 491 Senior Survey (0 credits)

Senior students, during their last semester, will take a general biology/microbiology assessment exam and fill out a survey to express their opinion of the biology/microbiology program.  Tests/surveys will be taken in the Testing Center at the student’s convenience, (but during normal Testing Center hours). Completion of the test/survey is a requirement for graduation. Grading Basis: Pass/Fail.